Bill Gates

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Last quote by Bill Gates

Because Xerox executives didn't think these [new] ideas fit their core business, they chose not to turn them into marketable products. Others stepped in and went to market with products based on the research that Xerox had done. I know I'm not alone in seeing this decision as a mistake on Xerox's part. Most of our competitors were one-product wonders…. They would do their one product, but never get their engineering sorted out. They did not think about software in this broad way. They would therefore do one product, but would not renew it to get it to the next generation.
Mar 22 2017
This page is completely dedicated to what Bill Gates has to say. All of Bill Gates’s quotes are organized here by date and topic. The most recent quote attributed to Bill Gates came from an article called Melinda Gates Opens Up About Dating Bill: ‘It’s a Partnership of Equals’: “I met her at a New York City sales meeting. And then it was only a week or so after that, that I went up to her in the parking lot and asked if she wanted to go out.”.
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Bill Gates quotes

Overall like Warren Buffett I am optimistic about the long run. I am concerned in the short run that the huge benefits of how the US works with other countries may get lost. This includes the aid we give to Africa to help countries there get out of the poverty trap.

I felt sure that allowing anyone to publish information and making it easy to find would enhance democracy and the overall quality of political debate.

However the partitioning you talk about which started on cable TV and might be even stronger in the digital world is a concern. We all need to think about how to avoid this problem. It would seem strange to have to force people to look at ideas they disagree with so that probably isn't the solution. We don't want to get to where American politics partitions people into isolated groups. I am interested in anyones [sic] suggestion on how we avoid this.

Remember the laugh we had when we traveled together to Hong Kong and decided to get lunch at McDonald's? You offered to pay, dug into your pocket, and pulled out … coupons!

If a human worker does $50,000 of work in a factory, that income is taxed. If a robot comes in to do the same thing, you'd think we'd tax the robot at a similar level. What the world wants is to take this opportunity to make all the goods and services we have today and free up labor – let us do a better job of reaching out to the elderly, having smaller class side, helping kids with special needs. All of those are things where human empathy and understanding are still very unique, and we still deal with an immense shortage of people to help out there.

Ten years ago, when we first got word of your gift to the Foundation, we were speechless. It was the biggest single gift anyone ever gave anybody for anything.

The budget is particularly tight, people are talking about increasing defense (spending), lowering taxes, interest costs will be higher. So when you look at it mathematically you say, Will the saving of millions of lives for less than $100 a year of drugs, will the U.S. continue to do that?' It's not clear where we're headed.

A problem of excess really forces us to look at the individuals affected and take those extra resources and make sure they are directed to them in terms of re-education and income policies.

This is a phenomenal time to be a curious person. The information that is out there! My biggest problem is that I stay up too late because I am reading and then I am a little bit tired the next day.

The work in artificial intelligence today is at a really profound level. It is going to be phenomenal, so anything connected with that I think would be an exciting lifetime career.

She pulled me out of my shell by sharing her love of books. I learned from Mrs. Caffiere that my teachers had so much more knowledge to share. I just needed to ask. Up through high school and beyond, I would often ask my teachers about the books they liked, read those books when I had some free time, and offer my thoughts.

It's very hard to rate the probability of bioterrorism but the potential damage is very huge. I'm hoping over the next few years there's some substantial investments.

Without investments in research and development, we will remain unequipped when we face the next threat. The ability to rapidly develop and deliver vaccines when new unknown diseases emerge offers our best hope to outpace outbreaks, save lives and avert disastrous economic consequences.

Hey, Mark. Can Jarvis secretly order a hamburger and have it delivered to the back door? Asking for a friend.

We're very close. Hopefully, the last case will be some time next year.

I do think we will have much better medical tools, much better response, but we are a bit vulnerable right now if something that spreads very quickly like say flu.

Which people are you going to back? Do their roles fit their abilities? Do they have both the IQ and EQ to succeed.

Warren is famous for this approach at Berkshire Hathaway, where he buys great businesses run by wonderful managers and then gets out of the way.

John Brooks' work is really about human nature, which is why it has stood the test of time. There's an essential human factor in every business endeavor. It doesn't matter if you have a perfect product, production plan and marketing pitch; you'll still need the right people to lead and implement those plans.

I do think of basic knowledge of the sciences, math skills, economics – a lot of careers in the future will be very demanding on those things.

When I was in my 20's and early 30's, I was fanatical about software. By 'fanatical,' I mean that I was so focused on my vision of putting a computer on every desk and in every home, that I gave up a normal existence.

What I appreciate most about his teaching style is how he is able to explain complex ideas in ways that are accessible to anyone.

Nandan and I share a common optimism about the potential of the digital revolution in India to improve lives through access to savings accounts, health records, and education.

Nate is a great example of what it takes to be an effective teacher. He works hard at his craft, always searching for ways to make a subject relevant for his students.

Unlike a lot of today's business writers, Brooks didn't boil his work down into pat how-to lessons or simplistic explanations for success (How many times have you read that some company is taking off because they give their employees free lunch?). You won't find any listicles in his work. Brooks wrote long articles that frame an issue, explore it in depth, introduce a few compelling characters, and show how things went for them.

Brooks's deeper insights about business are just as relevant today as they were back then.

We had a good conversation about innovation, how it can help in health, education, impact of foreign aide and energy.

We are long-term oriented and don't think that we understand the macroeconomics enough that we are making bets that are specific to that piece.

Of course, my whole career has been along those lines. And he was interested in listening to that. And I'm sure there will be further conversation.

But in the same way President Kennedy talked about the space mission and got the country behind that, I think whether it's education or stopping epidemics ... [or] in this energy space, there can be a very upbeat message that [Trump's] administration [is] going to organize things, get rid of regulatory barriers, and have American leadership through innovation.

Right now, the peso has been very weak. So it will be interesting to see as the U.S.-Mexico relations get developed under this [Trump] administration is that oversold?

Brown shows that the leaders who make the biggest contributions to history and humanity generally are not the ones we perceive to be 'strong leaders.' Instead, they tend to be the ones who collaborate, delegate, and negotiate – and recognize that no one person can or should have all the answers.

I don't think Knight sets out to teach the reader anything. Instead, he accomplishes something better. He tells his story as honestly as he can. It's an amazing tale.

This year's fierce election battle prompted me to pick up this 2014 book, by an Oxford University scholar who has studied political leadership – good, bad, and ugly – for more than 50 years.

I've been reading about a book a week on average since I was a kid. Even when my schedule is out of control, I carve out a lot of time for reading.

Part of the reason I find this topic fascinating is because my first job, in high school, was writing software for the entity that controls the power grid in the Northwest. But even if you have never given a moment's thought to how electricity reaches your outlets, I think this book would convince you that the electrical grid is one of the greatest engineering wonders of the modern world.

Here, as in his other brilliant works, Wallace found mind-blowing ways of bending language like a metal spoon.

Mukherjee wrote this book for a lay audience, because he knows that the new genome technologies are at the cusp of affecting us all in profound ways.

Melinda and I are pleased to make this investment in the University of Washington to help dramatically accelerate their 25-year vision to achieve positive health outcomes for populations around the world.

Our big priority is health and there is still a lot to be done. The child mortality rate came down from 1990 to the present - it was cut in half, which is fantastic. But that still leaves far too many children dying.

He aimed to boost household chicken ownership in places such as West Africa, where it is now 5 percent, to 30 percent.

The numbers today in terms of Americans who give to Heifer or things like that is actually quite small, so we'd like to see that scaled up.

The parable could have been stated in terms of giving somebody a chicken and showing them how to raise chickens.

This is a specific case where the government is asking for access to information. They are not asking for some general thing, they are asking for a particular case.

Who are the innovators? It's this next young generation and it's not going to happen overnight, it's only through their commitment that we'll see by 2050 the kind of dramatic change that we need to see.

There's a couple of things the foundation has invested in for a long time, one is how you either change mosquitoes not to carry viruses or how you change mosquitoes so their populations go down dramatically. Those are technologies that we were working on to get rid of dengue and malaria.

The increased governmental research and private investment are to address climate change and to reduce the cost of energy, to reduce poverty. We need to move to sources of energy that are even cheaper than the hydrocarbon energy we use today. We need it to be not only clean, but also reliable.

There are dozens of things like that that are high risk but huge impact if they are successful.

Well, Germany has always been very generous in helping with aid issues, they have been a partner, Can we all be more generous, can we be more effective? Talking about the various projects it's great to come here, I got a chance to meet with the chancellor, the science minister, the finance minister, a lot of key partners.

Thirty years ago Microsoft was just an idea that Paul Allen and I had; and it's amazing to think what that idea has transformed into – not just in terms of the company and the great people there – but the impact that it's had: the personal computer is the tool of communications and creativity.

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