Bill Gross

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Last quote by Bill Gross

The Fed as the global central bank, if it intends to raise and if it intends to sell back into the market like it suggests, would put pressure upward pressure on the dollar, and that is a consideration that must be taken into account by the global central bank. An investor simply has to realize that the days of double digits are over and that under this scenario and the Fed's mild, perhaps significant tightening posture as evidenced by this statement, dividends are going to be key going forward.feedback
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Jun 14 2017
In this page, you will find a list of 48 quotes from Bill Gross, from different articles. We analyzed 32 articles in which Bill Gross has been quoted in topics like Fed and Yellen. Bill Gross’s most recent quote is: “All markets are increasingly at risk.”. To see more examples Bill Gross’s views and opinions, check out the section below.
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Bill Gross quotes

Mar 09 2017

The U.S. and indeed the global economy is walking a fine line due to increasing leverage and the potential for too high (or too low) interest rates to wreak havoc on an increasingly stressed financial system. Be more concerned about the return of your money than the return on your money in 2017 and beyond.feedback

Mar 09 2017 - Federal Reserve

In China, the ratio has more than doubled in the past decade to nearly 300 percent. Since 2007, China has added $24 trillion worth of debt to its collective balance sheet. Over the same period, the U.S. and Europe only added $12 trillion each. Keeping the cost of credit at a yield that is not too high, nor too low, but just right. (Federal Reserve chair) Janet Yellen is a modern day Goldilocks.feedback

Mar 09 2017

The U.S. and indeed the global economy is walking a fine line due to increasing leverage and the potential for too high (or too low) interest rates to wreak havoc on an increasingly stressed financial system. Be more concerned about the return of your money than the return on your money in 2017 and beyond. In the U.S., credit of $65 trillion is roughly 350 percent of annual GDP and the ratio is rising.feedback

Mar 09 2017

Our highly levered financial system is like a truckload of nitro glycerin on a bumpy road. One mistake can set off a credit implosion where holders of stocks, high yield bonds, and yes, subprime mortgages all rush to the bank to claim its one and only dollar in the vault. Today, central bank flexibility is not what it was back then. Yields globally are near zero and in many cases, negative. Continuing QE programs by central banks are approaching limits as they buy up more and more existing debt, threatening repo markets and the day to day functioning of financial commerce.feedback

Feb 06 2017

In order to control volatility, and keep a floor under asset prices, central bankers may be trapped in a QE-forever cycle, (in order to keep the global system functioning). Withdrawal of stimulus, as has happened with the Fed in the past few years, seemingly must be replaced by an increased flow of asset purchases (bonds and stocks) from other central banks.feedback

Feb 06 2017

Quantitative easing will continue even though the dose may be reduced in future years. But while a methadone habit is far better than a heroin fix, it has created and will continue to create an unhealthy capitalistic equilibrium that one day must be reckoned with. A $12 trillion global central bank balance sheet is PERMANENT – and growing at over $1 trillion a year, thanks to the ECB and the BOJ. An investor must know that it is this money that now keeps the system functioning.feedback

Feb 01 2017 - Bear market

I think fiscal policy is the dominant trend in the United States. But let's not forget other central banks and the minute that they stop buying bonds is the minute that the bear market in bonds may begin.feedback

Jan 20 2017

Productivity needs to grow at least by 2 to 3 percent as the labor force is only growing at half a percent. ... I'm skeptical.feedback

Jan 20 2017

Corporations basically have had the cash and the money to invest if they wanted to. The question is whether the future environment promotes that.feedback

Jan 20 2017

There's no doubt that many aspects of Trump's agenda are good for stocks and bad for bonds near-term – tax cuts, deregulation, fiscal stimulus, etc.. But longer term, investors must consider the negatives of Trump's anti-globalization ideas which may restrict trade and negatively affect corporate profits.feedback

Jan 10 2017 - World Happiness report

Investment happiness and/or despair may lie ahead over the next 12 months depending on it.feedback

Jan 10 2017

If 2.6 percent is broken on the upside ... a secular bear bond market has begun. Watch the 2.6 percent level. Much more important than Dow 20,000. Much more important than $60-a-barrel oil. Much more important than dollar/euro parity at 1.00. It is the key to interest rate levels and perhaps stock prices in 2017.feedback

Jan 10 2017

Trump's policies may grant a temporary acceleration over the next few years, but a 2 percent longer term standard is likely in place that will stunt corporate profit growth and slow down risk asset appreciation.feedback

Jan 10 2017 - World Happiness report

Happiness has dominated risk markets since early November and despair has characterized global bond markets. Are risk markets overpriced and Treasuries over-yielded? That is a critical question for 2017.feedback

Jan 10 2017 - American politics

We shall see whether Republican/Trumpian orthodoxy can stimulate an economy that in some ways is at full capacity already. To do so would require a significant advance in investment spending which up until now has taken a backseat to corporate stock buybacks and merger/acquisition related uses of cash flow. I, for one, am skeptical of the 3 and more confident of the 2.feedback

Dec 06 2016

Begin to emphasize 'fiscal' as opposed to 'monetary' policy, but never mention Keynes or significant increases in government deficit spending. Use the buzzwords of 'infrastructure' spending and 'lower taxes.' Everyone wants those potholes fixed, don't they? Everyone wants lower taxes too!feedback

Nov 02 2016

We're stuck in this 0 to 2 percent rut and it's not good for financial assets, which have been overpriced for 5 to 6 years.feedback

Nov 02 2016

I do think that if Trump wins, it's a dollar negative for developed countries. It's equity negative because of the potential volatility. It's bond market negative because of the spending and the tax reductions, in terms of potential and higher inflation.feedback

Nov 02 2016

He's a bigger spender than Clinton, at least in terms of his tax cuts and potential policies. He's attacked the Fed over the past few months and that's not necessarily a positive in terms of independence for the Fed and the potential for inflation going forward.feedback

Oct 04 2016

Our argument is that NIMs (net interest margins) for banks, and the solvency of insurance companies and pension funds with long dated and underfunded liabilities, have been negatively affected and that ultimately, the continuation of current monetary policies will lead to capital destruction as opposed to capital creation.feedback

Oct 04 2016

A commonsensical observation made by yours truly and increasing numbers of economists, Fed members, and corporate CEOs (Jamie Dimon amongst them) would be that low/negative yields erode and in some cases destroy historical business models which foster savings/investment and ultimately economic growth.feedback

Oct 04 2016

At some point investors – leery and indeed weary of receiving negative or near zero returns on their money, may at the margin desert the standard financial complex, for higher returning or better yet, less risky alternatives.feedback

Aug 31 2016 - Federal Reserve

With Yellen, there is no right or left hand – no 'on the one hand but then on the other' – there are only decades of old orthodoxy that follows the tarnished golden rule of lowering interest rates to elevate asset prices, which in turn could (should) trickle down to the real economy.feedback

Aug 31 2016

Capitalism, almost commonsensically, cannot function well at the zero bound or with a minus sign as a yield.feedback

Aug 31 2016 - Federal Reserve

All have mastered the art of market manipulation and no - that's not an unkind accusation - it's one in fact that Ms. Yellen and other central bankers would plead guilty to over a cocktail at Jackson Hole or any other get together of Ph.D. economists who have lost their way.feedback

Aug 26 2016

The Fed, with their focus on low interest rates, is distorting the savings function, not only in the United States but on a global basis, and savings of course is connected to investment. Ultimately I think that's what reduces real economic growth going forward and they don't realize that.feedback

Aug 03 2016 - Japan

If we see fiscal stimulation in Japan China and ultimately the U.S. after the election, I think we should be investing in real assets as opposed to financial assets.feedback

Aug 03 2016

Real assets such as land, gold, and tangible plant and equipment at a discount are favored asset categories. But those are hard for an individual to buy because wealth has been 'financialized.feedback

Aug 03 2016

Banks, insurance companies, pension funds and Mom and Pop on Main Street are stripped of their ability to pay for future debts and retirement benefits. Central banks seem oblivious to this dark side of low interest rates. If maintained for too long, the real economy itself is affected as expected income fails to materialize and investment spending stagnates.feedback

Aug 03 2016

Negative returns and principal losses in many asset categories are increasingly possible unless nominal growth rates reach acceptable levels.feedback

Jul 27 2016

Ultimately in terms of real economic growth, an economy needs certainly a positive interest rate and maybe even a close to positive real interest rate in order to function normally.feedback

Jul 06 2016

It is time to worry about the return of your money as opposed to the return on your money.feedback

Jul 06 2016

Until governments can spend money and replace the animal spirits lacking in the private sector, then the Monopoly board and meager credit growth shrinks as a future deflationary weapon.feedback

Jun 20 2016

I knew I didn't have much to gain except for my self respect. I thought I was treated unfairly on the way out from Pimco: They fired me without really giving a reason for it. There was a small coup of individuals that threatened to resign if I didn't.feedback

Jun 12 2016

France ... or Italy might suddenly decide their own domestic internal policies should be favored versus that of a larger EU family.feedback

Mar 30 2016

It's like first-grade math. Here's a non-wonkish statement: When money yields nothing, then it will return nothing. So, when bonds have a zero percent interest rate, or negative interest rate, then there's nothing to gain from owning them.feedback

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