Lawrence Yun

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Last quote by Lawrence Yun

Investors came in to get that cash flow, and the cash flow remains very positive. The price appreciation is just extra gravy that they're witnessing, and they're saying they're going to ride out this price increase.
Mar 23 2017
We found 29 articles in which Lawrence Yun said something. The most recent Lawrence Yun’s quote is: “Investors came in to get that cash flow, and the cash flow remains very positive. The price appreciation is just extra gravy that they're witnessing, and they're saying they're going to ride out this price increase.”. In addition, all sources we refer have quoted Lawrence Yun 41 times. On this page, you will find all of Lawrence Yun’s quotes organized by date and topic.
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Lawrence Yun quotes

We have a housing shortage. We are not building enough housing.

Younger households, renters and those living in the costlier West region – where prices have soared in recent months – are the least optimistic about buying.

With mortgage rates expected to rise into next year and put added strain on affordability, sales expansion will be contingent on more inventory coming onto the market and continued job gains.

Those obtaining a mortgage last month were likely the last group of buyers to lock in a rate near historically low levels now that rates have marched to around 4 percent since the election.

Single women for years have indicated a strong desire to own a home of their own, as well as an inclination to live closer to friends and family. With job growth holding steady and credit conditions becoming somewhat less stringent than in past years, the willingness and opportunity to buy is becoming more feasible for many single women.

Buyer demand is holding up impressively well this fall with Realtors reporting much stronger foot traffic compared to a year ago. Although depressed inventory levels are keeping home prices elevated in most of the country, steady job gains and growing evidence that wages are finally starting to tick up are encouraging more households to consider buying a home.

Contract activity slackened throughout the country in August except for in the Northeast, where higher inventory totals are giving home shoppers greater options and better success signing a contract. In most other areas, an increased number of prospective buyers appear to be either wavering at the steeper home prices pushed up by inventory shortages or disheartened by the competition for the miniscule number of affordable listings.

We go back to the same bottom line: lack of inventory choices and prices rising way too fast.

Existing sales above $1 million were down a bit in July. This was in large part due to the stock market volatility seen earlier this summer leading up to and immediately after Brexit. The financial markets have stabilized since then.

Steadily improving local job markets and mortgage rates teetering close to all-time lows brought buyers out in force in many large and middle-tier cities. However, with homebuilding activity still failing to keep up with demand and not enough current homeowners putting their home up for sale, prices continued their strong ascent – and in many markets at a rate well above income growth.

I think this is leading to that sense of envy and what the millennial generation calls 'fomo,' or 'fear of missing out'. If someone's friends are doing well, they fear they're missing out and they want to be more active in the home-buying process.

Real estate is a major expenditure, so it's not about buying chewing gum or penny stocks. The trust factor ingrains a person to say, Yeah, buying real estate is something I should seriously consider.

Limited selection of homes at bargain prices is reducing the number of individual investors willing or able to buy. This will hopefully open the door for first-time buyers, who made some progress last month but are still buying homes at a subpar level even as rents increase at rates not seen since before the downturn.

Until inventory conditions markedly improve, far too many prospective buyers are likely to run into situations of either being priced out of the market or outbid on the very few properties available for sale.

Maybe that has induced some first-time buyers to come back into the market.

The financial and emotional impact of repaying student debt is contributing to a delay in purchasing a home for many would-be buyers. At a time of quickly rising rents, mortgage rates at all-time lows and increasing housing wealth, a lot of young adults in their prime buying years are struggling to enter the market and are ultimately missing out on the stability and wealth accumulation that owning a home can provide.

Weaker economic growth throughout the world, devalued foreign currencies and financial market turbulence combined to present significant challenges for foreign buyers over the past year. While these obstacles led to a cool down in sales from nonresident foreign buyers, the purchases by recent immigrant foreigners rose, resulting in the overall sales dollar volume still being the second highest since 2009.

Led by Venezuela (45 percent) and Brazil (24 percent), at least eight countries, including China and Canada, saw double-digit percent increases in the median sales price of a U.S. existing home when measured in their country's currency.

Although China's currency modestly weakened versus the U.S. dollar in the past year, it's much stronger than it was five to 10 years ago, thereby making U.S. properties still appear reasonably affordable over a longer time span.

Sales activity from U.K. buyers could very well subside over the next year depending on how severe the economic fallout is from Britain's decision to leave the European Union. However, with economic instability and political turmoil outside of the U.S. likely to persist, the world view of American real estate as a safe investment should keep demand firm even as pressures from a stronger dollar continue to weigh down on affordability.

With demand holding firm this spring and homes selling even faster than a year ago, the notable increase in closings in recent months took a dent out of what was available for sale in May and ultimately dragged down contract activity. Realtors are acknowledging with increasing frequency lately that buyers continue to be frustrated by the tense competition and lack of affordable homes for sale in their market.

In the short term, volatility in the financial markets could very likely lead to even lower mortgage rates and increased demand from foreign buyers looking for a safer place to invest their cash. On the other hand, any prolonged market angst and further economic uncertainty overseas could negatively impact our economy and end up tempering the overall appetite for home buying.

We are seeing flashing yellow lights on affordability. People who are currently renting and want to convert into ownership – major difficulty. Home prices are rising way too fast compared to people's income and wage growth.

Despite supply deficiencies in plenty of areas, contract activity was fairly strong in a majority of markets in March. This spring's surprisingly low mortgage rates are easing some of the affordability pressures potential buyers are experiencing and are taking away some of the sting from home prices that are still rising too fast and above wage growth.

Now that there are fewer distressed homes available, it appears there's been a shift toward investors purchasing lower-priced homes and turning them into rentals. Already facing affordability issues, this competition at the entry-level market only adds to the roadblocks slowing first-time buyers.

(Friday's) data just confirms that the November drop was due to delays in closings that were pushed to December.

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