Sergio Cantone

facebook_page
twitter_page

Last quote by Sergio Cantone

They don't want to make any comment about the issue and that's not only because they are afraid of unveiling some black financial scheme, but it's also about some concerns regarding the political relationship between the USA, Ukraine and their own party.
Aug 19 2016
We can learn a lot about a person if we know what types of things he or she talks about or comments on the most frequently. There are numerous topics with which Sergio Cantone is associated, including Eastern Ukraine and Russia. Most recently, Sergio Cantone has been quoted saying: “You said about yourself that you are the Elvis of philosophy. Is that …” in the article Slovenian philosopher Slavoy Zizek warns about "new invisible walls".
Automatically powered byStoryzy

Sergio Cantone quotes

The good contact for him was a battalion or regular army? Who sold him this weapon?

Which organisation does he belong to, according to your investigation?

Which Ukrainian unit did he contact, (voluntary) battalions or a regular army unit?

Welcome to euronews. As far as this operation is concerned do you consider it's over or do you think there is still a job to do?

Throughout this operation, the Ukrainian security service and the Ukrainian authorities in general are showing the European Union that it can count on them when it comes to their own security. Of course, they're doing that also in the framework of the negotiation concerning the conflict in the Donbas.

This possible change of prime minister will have to accelerate the pace of reform, of course. But it will also have to avoid the idea that the change has been done for other vested interests.

But in the eyes of Russia the association agreement between the EU and Ukraine remains a major threat to its trade and political national interests.

The question is not just about the sanctions against Russia, but also about the implementation of the Minsk agreement. Especially because next January the association agreement between the EU and Ukraine, which sparked this crisis two years ago, will be adopted.

So the United States is giving strong support to Ukraine in the conflict against Russia. But, at the same time, they are asking for much more efforts in the fight against corruption.

The Right Sector says it wants to organise a referendum against the government because it wants to appear politically active and ready to challenge a government that didn't live up to expectations, after many months of fighting in Eastern Ukraine.

This used to be one of Kyiv's most important May Day locations. This is where Lenin's statue once stood. That's a memory shared by just few people. Some communists who want to remember the workers' day. While on the other side there are some anti-communists who want to reject the sense of this celebration.

So the construction of the sheltering structure continues according to schedule. The biggest problem will come afterwards and it's about removing all the radioactive elements in reactor number 4. At the moment a technical solution seems still to be a long way off.

Nobody believes in the ceasefire and in the capacity of diplomacy to solve this conflict. People and soldiers are expecting the worst in the hours to come, specifically attacks in the direction of Artemivsk and Mariupol.

The pro-European parties are slightly ahead. Nevertheless that doesn't seem to preserve Moldova from the risk of destabilisation. That's the reason why they shall try to enlarge their political base which could support the outgoing pro-EU coalition.

According to the militia who brought us here, we are right on the front line. We are just one kilometre from the Ukrainian outposts and positions.

This is an electoral process being held under the emotional pressure of war. Therefore people want to vote hoping that a stronger power might help to undertake the reconstruction.

The election is being held with the echoes of war in the background despite a precarious ceasefire. It is also a huge symbol of the self-proclaimed republic's desire to distance itself from the political will of the government in Kyiv.

No Ukrainian seems to agree with Russia increasing its military presence near the border. It is taking place despite the commitments made at the Minsk summit. A political solution to the conflict seems as far away as it ever was.

It separates the centre of Donetsk from the combat zone. When we went beyond the bridge, we heard some sporadic explosions.

There is a kind of enthusiasm in the camp of the, let's say, pro-Russia' separatists, who are convinced they've had a great victory and that a page has to be turned now. It's fairly calm in Donetsk. Anyone who voted against the majority in this referendum prefers to keep quiet about it.

At the end of the service the priest said that only in the afterlife we will know the truth of this death. But one thing is certain, many people in Mariupol think they already know the truth. And many of these people, not particularly anti-Kyiv before, have been changing their opinions after Friday's bloodshed.

What is happening in Mariupol is digging a deep hole in society in southeast Ukraine, in Donetsk and the Donbass region. That will have a strong impact on what will happen next, with the May 11 referendum and the presidential elections (set for May 25).

The supporters of self determination for Donetsk and Donbass are apparently looking for a fait accompli that would give them further legitimacy. But their ultimate goal is still to be unveiled.

The antagonism in southeastern Ukraine is almost turning into civil war. It's an intense struggle that will heavily influence the elections, not only (this Sunday's self-proclaimed) referendum (on independence for the Donetsk region).

Ukraine's attempted mission to retake this zone has been paralysed, resulting in almost a complete turnaround in the situation.

The pro Russians are now taking up positions in the city, this time with tanks.They are waiting for the Ukrainian forces.

It is not just about a barricade in the city and away from that public building there is some tension, a little fear but surprisingly life goes on as normal.

We are in front of one of Ukraine's military bases in the Crimean peninsula. The situation at the base is turning into a major political problem. Namely, what will now happen to the Ukrainian soldiers inside now that the region has voted to join Russia?

I feel humiliated, I have no future, I don't see any future here in Crimea. Ukraine, the government in Kyiv, we have the feeling that they don't care whether Crimea is part of Ukraine or not. They just don't care. They make decisions in Kyiv and have forgotten Ukrainians still live here. There is something else you must understand; nobody is going to fight against the pro-Russia self-defence forces. If the decision is taken to formally join Russia, the brigade will not fight, they will give up.

The outcome of this referendum is in no doubt; there are expectations for a massive victory for the vote to separate. And the pro-Russian population is happy and is just waiting for the result to be officially announced.

People in Simferopol see this as a provocation by Western countries, because they feel they do not want to accept the choice of most people in Crimea, who are willing to move toward Russia, or, at least, to move away from Ukraine, especially after the Maidan revolution.

The local pro-Russian population is enthusiastic about the presence of of the unidentified soldiers seen here. This could all be viewed as being part of a game between Moscow and Kyiv – especially after the changes in Kyiv.

Finally here are the Russian APCs with number plates and identification signs. They are on the road from Sevastopol to Simfereopol. But it is not clear where are they heading.

The word ceasefire sounds somehow ironic during this night in Maidan. Nevertheless there is a chance to be seized by both sides, which has been presented by circumstances and international pressure being brought to bear on President Yanukovych and everyone concerned.

The government should probably start reconsidering its decision (over the new regulations), because although it does concern the rule of law, in this case it also has huge political significance.

Supporters of President Yanukovych -who came to Kyiv to back the Party of Regions and the government of the president – are waiting for Tuesday's meeting between Putin and Yanukovych. They of course hope for a move closer to Russia, even though it's not sure to happen.

Who gave the order for the intervention of riot police in Maidan last Saturday. Did they came from above, from the president basically?

Prime Minister Azarov said that demonstrators cannot count on parliamentary privilege as the opposition leaders can. That sounds like a warning to protesters in order to convince them to throw in the towel otherwise they could get into trouble with the law. Despite that the crowd so far doesn't seem to be willing to give up, in fact more and more people are coming every evening to Independence Square.

There was a deliberate intention by the riot police, the Berkut (the special police unit) to clear the square and they used the force to do that. So there was some order and we would like to know who gave that order.

With the leaders of the opposition back from Vilnius, the demonstrators have a clearer political focus. So the polarisation between pro-EU and anti-EU will be the main topic of the upcoming presidential election campaign, likely to start in the first half of 2014.

Thousands of people are gathering in Maidan, downtown Kyiv. They are all asking the same thing of President Yanukovich – sign the association agreement with the EU. There are artists, intellectuals, but also people from neighbouring countries because they think that this could not only change things in Ukraine but also elsewhere.

Prime Minister, are you surprised by the reaction of the Ukrainians: protesting against the decision of your government not to sign the Association Agreement with European Union?

Don't you think that the Association Agreement, with the free trade agreement, is a kind of crossroads for the EU between values and realpolitik?

This trade row that is hitting major Ukrainian companies and capital interests has softened the EU's stance towards the conditions that Kiev must fulfill in order to sign the association agreement at the end of November.

This is a historic moment for the Catholic Church. It's the first time that a pope is taking the name Francis. He comes from Latin America, from Argentina, and this is new. What that will bring to innovate and evangelise, we will know in time.

Father Rogers, what do you think about this conclave, which by the way is a particularly special one?

The coalition's victory, led by Bidzina Ivanishvili has shaken the power base of the President Mikhail Saakashvili. Now they will have to work together for the next year and in that time they will confront each other.

The electoral party night says a lot about the need for political and social change in the country. Will Georgia be able to take on and make the huge reforms needed on a domestic as well as an international political level? That is question to be answered by whomever will rule the country in the years to come.

Macro-economic indicators suggest that Georgia is growing. However, this growth is not being reflected in the distribution of resources, especially at state welfare level. This is due to two main factors, the Russian embargo on Georgian exports and the absence of an association agreement with the EU.

There are winners and losers. There is also a certain pleasure despite defeat as the long Kiev party will prove. This Euro 2012 ended with a great win for Spain, but a great night for everyone.

Spain are through to the final much to the joy of Spanish and local supporters. There they'll play Germany or Italy. Actually some of the Spanish have said they they hope it will be against Italy, one wonders why?

As you can see, there's no sign of tension or violence so far, as both England and Ukrainian supporters hang out together. But maybe tonight's result will decide whether relations stay so amicable.

This press conference seems to be an attempt to split President Yanukovich's support by appealing to his less hawkish followers who might want to side with the European Union and the international community.

The opposition is riding the wave of protest, by saying that the rule of law is in danger in this country. For its part, the government says that it's just fighting corruption as the international community has demanded.

The Tymoshenko appeal is being held up by legal arguments between the defence and the court. Her lawyers want the judges removed because, they say, they are President Yanukovich's puppets. But underlying these skirmishes is a complex chess game between the government and the opposition in Ukraine.

What's happening seems like a regime change, with president Smirnov finally leaving power after nearly twenty years, in order to facilitate a solution to the old conflict between Moldova and Transdniestria. A regime change which the president himself sees as pushed from abroad, from the international community.

According to the criticisms coming from other countries at an institutional level, not only at public opinion level, the judiciary system here, in this country, is not that independent and they are saying that you as a president have the power to influence these kind of decisions. What is your response to that?

There was great disappointment here in Kiev after the verdict against Tymoshenko had been announced. Now maybe the president and the parliament could change the law, due to international pressure, and decriminalise the crime committed by Tymoshenko, the crime for which she was convicted.

According to many observers, this crucial verdict could influence the future of political alliances within the country. And of course, a ruling against Ukraine's Tymoshenko could hamper prospects of developing connections with the European Union.

They feel that it's a judgement that will shape Ukraine's future alliance, and even its future foreign policy. If a guilty verdict is handed down, it could see Ukraine drift away from the EU.

Despite the attempt to use the case against Ratko Mladic to shed light on the question of the UN's responsibility, the trial itself seems to concentrate only on that of the Serb general: the sole and exclusive architect, according to the accusations against him, of the massacre at Srebrenica.

There's a great deal of emotion around the Scheveningen prison near The Hague, where General Mladic has arrived. The Serbian general will be tried for war crimes committed during the Balkan wars. It is the beginning of the end. Later he will undergo health checks before beginning the legal process.

Some of the members of the Eurogroup are increasing their pressure on Greece. They want Athens to quicken the pace of privatisation, but Athens is afraid of sparking more social unrest.

A lot of member states seem to want a watered-down version of the Schengen Convention. The Commission should be able to avoid the worst, but how? That remains to be seen. We will probably find out at the next European Summit in June.

Japan looks really far away to the inhabitants of Tihange and Huy, and they do not feel not particularly concerned by the Japanese situation.

The EU countries are timidly, bit by bit, convincing themselves that Mubarak is no longer fit to wield power. They are inching towards a Mubarak farewell. In fact, the noise of the Cairo protests is influencing the West's decision-making process.

The world record of going without a government, according to a new website, is Iraq's, with 289 days. This Thursday sees Belgium with 228 days under its belt. Ivory Coast is given as an outsider, at 60 days bereft of a government. The Belgians, despite the political crisis, are not losing their historical sense of humour; they set up the website.

Visa liberalisation together with balanced trade between the EU and Russia, especially after its accession to the WTO, would have given Medvedev a good Christmas present to go back to Moscow with. That would have given him a competitive advantage over his rival for the future office of the Russian presidency, Prime Minister Putin.

One of the solutions, could be watering down the idea of forcing banks to share the burden in further crises. This idea is supposed to calm down the markets. But we have to wait to find out how they will react.

In the core of the EU institutional quarter, Brussels, Rue de la Loi, you can be blocked for hours.

The bail-out mechanism and revision of the treaty, interest rates and the risks of referenda mean that van Rompuy has a tough several weeks to cope with. As the European Council's President, he'll need to employ all his diplomatic skills to moderate and negotiate, as he seeks a consensus on this among all the 27 EU countries.

It is going to be difficult: Most of the EU members are opposing the German-French proposal. Van Rompuy might get some new ideas after round table talks, for a new one for December.

Have successfully rejected any attempt by the EU officials of winning them over to re-evaluate their national currency.

The arm wrestling between countries, especially those of the European Union, and the market speculators seems for the moment to have been won on points by the EU. However, doubts remain about this modification of the Treaty of Maastricht. It's not yet known how far this will lead towards a greater integration of economic policies.

Thousands of passengers are either trying to reach Britain by sea or trying to reach the Continent from Great Britain. Moreover there is another traffic jam – thousands of rental cars which are waiting for passengers to drive them all over Europe.

Brussels' stations are crowded. The Gare du Midi is being besieged by passengers trying to reach various locations in northern Europe, especially London.

There is still an important detail: when would Greece have access to any aid? Athens wants it as fast as possible, but countries with more belief in strictness want to wait till the Greeks make another effort to face the financial markets alone.

Coffee is a national drink in Greece and the average price of a cup is 2,50€. Greeks think that it is expensive. It is a symbol of the imbalance of prices in this country. And with VAT increasing the situation could get even worse as Greek inflation is already higher than in other euro-zone countries.

Why is the commisison giving this authorisation now?

The wait and see approach of the Eurogroup on the adoption of rescue measures for Greek finances could expose Greece to the fury of the markets. However, it is the result of a compromise formula among countries such as Germany, the Netherlands and Finland who wanted the toughest austerity measures to be taken by Greece – and the other countries such as France, Italy and Spain who wanted a more open approach on the Hellenic demands.

What's the first measure the new Commission is going to adopt?

This Commission is often said to have become a bureaucratic, grey, barely political organisation. Will it spring any surprises on us?

The death sentence handed to Opel Antwerp is symbolic of the crisis of the industry in Europe. And the EU is finding it difficult to keep member states in line over the single market and state aid rules. Here Opel workers are asking why is their factory to go when others stay open.

So the main problem remains the conflict of interests with her family's business?

When it comes to preparation for this job, do you think that she is prepared?

When it comes to financial supervision, are you thinking about a common EU body with binding powers?

Do you think that central and eastern Europe needs a sort of bail-out? Or do you think that is better not to do it?

Is your government doing enough in order to tackle the corruption, which is affecting, of course, the distribution of these funds?

There is an important report by OLAF, the anti-corruption unit of the European Union. It's a June 2008 report, that is not that good for Bulgaria and it's last year. So what do you think about it? It's not 10 years ago.

What about the European Commission, do you think that the European Commission is wrong in freezing the funds for Bulgaria because of crime and corruption.

No quotes...
More Sergio Cantone quotes

Quotes by Sergio Cantone

facebook_page
twitter_page
This webpage has been created by a robot: errors and absent quotes cannot be totally avoided