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Last quote about Brexit

David Davis
When we are doing all these deals on trade and other areas, there will be arbitration arrangements. There won't be the ECJ, there will be a mutually agreed chairman and somebody nominated from both sides, that's the normal way, but there my be other ways too, and it may well be we have an arbitration arrangement over this, but it's not going to be the European Court of Justice. It's about finding the place that suits both sides. That's what we're about. I'm pretty sure [we can reach a deal]. I'm not 100 per cent sure. You can never be. It's a negotiation...I'm pretty sure, but I'm not certain.feedback
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NEW Jun 25 2017
“The commitment that we make to EU citizens will be enshrined in UK law and will be enforced through our highly respected courts.” said Theresa May speaking about Brexit. It’s one of the 796 quotes about Brexit you can find on this page. 372 people have said something about this topic. Among them: David Davis, Emmanuel Macron and Michel Barnier. Browse the quotes by date and by name to find those that are relevant to you.
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All quotes about Brexit

David Davis

It will be stiff, it will be small movements incrementally, so small it will be invisible sometimes, but it will happen.feedback

David Davis

I never said it was a breeze. I said it will be turbulent, there will be difficulties but at the end there is a point of common interest.feedback

David Davis

This is not an ideological thing - it is a practical thing. I didn't apologise to her. I didn't design the campaign, I thought we'd get a better result than you did.feedback

David Davis

Get on with the day job. People put us here to deliver a decent economy, to deliver a decent life for them, to deliver Brexit.feedback

David Davis

It is not a macho clashing of antlers, it is about finding the place that suits both sides. They get the same residence rights, the same employment rights, the same rights, the same health rights, the same welfare rights, the same pensions rights and so on, almost the same as British citizens.feedback

David Davis

Look, I'm not going to get into it. It's self-indulgent. Frankly the fact that we have spent two minutes on it is self-indulgent.feedback

David Davis

There is no essay crisis about this Government. It is very, very, very clear that she is a good prime minister.feedback

Alistair Carmichael

This is a historic chance to defeat the Government and force Theresa May to rethink her approach to Brexit. Many people, including those who voted Leave, are increasingly worried about what Brexit will mean for our economy and living standards. It is our responsibility as MPs to listen to these concerns and work together to get the best possible deal. We're now staring over the precipice at the economic reality of an extreme Brexit. Future generations won't forgive us if we fail to act.feedback

Justin Welby

We need the politicians to find a way of neutralising the temptation to take minor advantage domestically from these great events. We must develop a forum or commission or some political tool which can hold the ring for the differences to be fought out, so that a commonly agreed negotiating aim is achieved. The future of this country is not a zero-sum, winner takes all calculation but must rest on the reconciled common good arrived at through good debate and disagreement.feedback

Donald Tusk - European Council

Citizens' rights are the number one priority for the EU 27 [all but Britain] and we have made our position clear. We want to ensure the full rights for EU and UK citizens after Brexit.feedback

Tim Farron

This is a sinister threat to the free media. How dare Andrea Leadsom tell the press what they should think? This isn't a George Orwell book. She needs to apologise for these comments and realise what she said was frankly stupid.feedback

Jonas Lovgren

Her fantastic spiel yesterday told us nothing new. Basically, it felt like she read out the government website and the details of things we are supposed to be guaranteed to already.feedback

Jonas Lovgren

It didn't take long last year for the campaign to get really nasty in terms of inflammatory language, and I've experienced some very unwelcome comments when I've been out with my daughters and have spoken Swedish to them.feedback

Ulrike Gupta

I doesn't really faze me. Yes, there are lots of documents needed and so on, but for us it feels like a must. We need to do so for the kids' sake.feedback

Maike Bohn

If there is no independent body involved then it means we are only protected by UK law, and a future government could make major changes. We have faith in the UK courts but not in the government.feedback

Tanja Bueltmann

If that is true then it is deeply shocking, because it means that all of the proposals from Theresa May mean nothing. The EU's motivation is, I think, a good one because they don't want there to be the risk of a retrospective change in five years time by authorities in the UK.feedback

Ulrike Gupta

Speaking to them in your mother tongue is a very normal thing to do because you want them to learn to speak the two languages, or in our cases three. It's a difficult feeling, because we also feel this is home. We studied here, we spent most of our adult life here the kids were born here. I don't trust a word she says. I heard a little bit about what she put on the table initially in Brussels – something like she wants to provide a guarantee the 3 million here – but I can't help but feel that it's just rhetoric and politics.feedback

Maike Bohn

It's an 85-page form and a very complicated process under which a third of applications are being rejected. If she is talking about 'lawful' citizens, then up a million people could end up being excluded. We need clarity on that. And after a year of hostile migration rhetoric we fear that as soon as the UK leaves the EU they could decide, no, they don't want us to have access to heathcare or other public services as a matter of right.feedback

Ulrike Gupta

I came to study English. I loved the country and the countryside, and really loved London. I got a job and here I am, 21 years later.feedback

Ulrike Gupta

My son asked me the week before the referendum if we would be kicked out of the country. I got really nervous about it. I'm angry and frustrated almost every day. I haven't spoken about anything else for a year.feedback

Andrew Rawnsley

For years we mocked our neighbours’ ‘unstable’ governments. Now, with Brexit upon us, the joke is on this country. A cartoon in a Dutch newspaper depicts Mrs May whacking herself over the head with a mallet. Another Dutch publication has the prime minister entering the Brexit negotiations with her severed head cradled under her arm. It is not just the Netherlands that is having a good giggle. Britain’s prime minister – and, by extension, Britain itself – is an object of torrential mockery across Europe. Here is payback for all those years when snooty Albion turned up a haughty nose at the continentals with their “funny” proportional electoral systems that produced “unstable” governments. Though European leaders are too polite to put it so bluntly, they think that this country, once thought to be a nation of level-headed pragmatists, has taken leave of its senses. First, Britons narrowly vote to quit the world’s largest and richest free trade area. Then, at an election less than 12 months later, Britons split their support between the parties in such a way that there is no consensus in parliament about the terms on which Britain should leave. There is not even agreement about how to proceed on Brexit within the riven ruling party. Ridicule abroad is matched by ridicule at home. This side of the channel, Mrs May is now routinely referred to and depicted as the “zombie prime minister”, a phrase I used to describe her immediately after the election.feedback

Frances O'Grady

If we leave the single market, working people will end up paying the price. It'd be bad for jobs, for work rights & for our living standards.feedback

Andrea Leadsom

Genuinely I feel that being a mum means you have a very real stake in the future of our country, a tangible stake.feedback

Andrea Leadsom

It would be helpful if broadcasters were willing to be a bit patriotic. The country took a decision, this government is determined to deliver on that decision. I'm not accusing you of anything, Emily. I'm simply saying we all need to pull together as a country. We took a decision a year ago today to leave the European Union, we have a very strong hand and we are very well prepared for the negotiations.feedback

Natalie Nougayrède

With so much volatility in the Middle East, a quiet rapprochement is in everyone’s interest. Remember how, during the Brexit referendum campaign, voters were told that “millions of Turks” would swamp Europe and Britain if it didn’t get out? Government ministers went on TV to say Turkey’s accession to the EU was just on the horizon, as a result of a refugee deal brokered between Angela Merkel and the Turkish government. Brexiters assured audiences that visa liberalisation for Turks was looming: the hordes were at the gates. None of that happened, of course. Nor is it about to.feedback

Sigmar Gabriel

The situation must be really tense if such an obvious thing is now considered as news. Of course people should at least have the right to stay, that is a minimum and personally I cannot imagine things differently.feedback

Laith Khalaf - Hargreaves Lansdown

The main financial effect of Brexit has been felt in the pound, though weaker sterling has pushed up inflation and also boosted the stock market. Holidaymakers have probably been the most obvious losers from Brexit so far, though inflation is also gradually ratcheting up the pressure on consumers more broadly. The performance of capital markets over the last year tells us that the financial effects of Brexit are about as predictable as the British weather.feedback

Vincent Keaveny - DLA Piper

Most market participants accept that dual supervision by the EU authorities and by the UK regulators, and information sharing amongst those regulators, will be necessary after Brexit. It is still not clear whether that will be enough to satisfy all of the EU regulators.feedback

Eva Oller

We had similar views on most things, we went travelling, enjoyed skiing, sailing, diving and hiking together. Then, one year ago, Brexit happened. I woke up in the morning and made some comments on Facebook about how devastated I felt and how I felt homeless. He got angry and told me to stop posting this stuff as his children and ex-wife voted for Brexit.feedback

Donald Tusk - European Council

Citizens rights are the number one rights for the EU 27 and we have made our position clear, we want to ensure the full rights for EU and UK citizens after Brexit. My first impression is the UK's offer is below expectation and risks worsening the situation of citizens but it will be for our negotiating team to analyze the offer line by line when we receive it on paper. It's obvious that the impact of Brexit in the citizens' rights area is negative, and our role is to reduce this negative.feedback

Michael Gray-Sloan

I think Brexit is a disaster, politically, economically, socially – nobody knows what is ahead of us and the fact that English folks has dragged us out of the European Union is almost criminal, completely insane.feedback

Theresa May

The commitment that we make to EU citizens will be enshrined in UK law and will be enforced through our highly respected courts.feedback

Azad Azam

In the construction industry you have a lot of materials coming from Europe. Now if we don't get the trade agreements that the government has suggested they're going to try to get, then all these supplies and all of those prices are just going to increase. Then we're not going to be even able to deliver the projects at the prices that we were previously going to, because everything is going to go up.feedback

Smita Mehra

We've been very privileged because there have been no barriers to recruitment and barriers to working laws or working conditions. Now if that were all to change it would produce uncertain times, and so I'm praying that things won't change.feedback

Joana Ferreira

I'm just worried about the living conditions, really. Am I going to be able to work? Am I going to get a normal salary, like everyone? Am I going to be kicked out of the country? I don't know, nobody knows!feedback

Azad Azam

We did offer him a permanent position, as he's done really well he's incredibly skillful. And as a result of that the contract I've offered him is 3 years. He's got a family back home, he's got a wife, he's got a child, and his intention is to make the UK their permanent home. Unfortunately, as a result of Brexit we're now in a position where the uncertainties created so many problems for him, we don't know whether he's going to be able to stay, he doesn't even know whether he's going to be able to stay.feedback

Charles Michel

We don't want to be sold a pig in a poke. The rights of EU citizens should be safeguarded in a sustainable manner.feedback

Angela Merkel

We will conduct these talks in a good spirit. But the clear focus has to be on the future of the 27.feedback

Charles Michel

I am not a dreamer. And I am not the only one. What we also need is certainty, for our companies in Belgium, in Europe. If we back this image that Brexit perhaps would not happen, it brings an uncertainty.feedback

Mark Rutte

It is crucially important we know what Great Britain wants from Brexit. I hope obviously we'll come to some form of continued [UK] membership or relationship with the internal market; with the customs union. I think that is in the interests of jobs in the United Kingdom.feedback

Donald Tusk - European Council

We can hear different predictions, coming from different people, about the possible outcome of these negotiations: hard Brexit, soft Brexit or no deal. Some of my British friends have even asked me whether Brexit could be reversed, and whether I could imagine an outcome where the UK stays part of the EU. I told them that in fact the European Union was built on dreams that seemed impossible to achieve. So, who knows? You may say I'm a dreamer, but I am not the only one.feedback

Jonathan Freedland

One year on, the certainties of the leave case are collapsing. We’re no longer shackled to that verdict. One year on, the political weather has changed and suddenly a once unthinkable question can be asked: might Brexit be stopped?feedback

Andrew Sheets

Gilts will outperform as growth will ultimately disappoint and increase the risk of a harder Brexit outcome.feedback

Nicolas Véron - Bruegel

Brexit creates a new reality where there are some clearinghouses that are outside the E.U. but critically important to the E.U.feedback

Charles Michel

We don't want to buy a pig in a poke. The rights of European citizens should be guaranteed in the long term.feedback

Donald Tusk - European Council

My first impression, is that the UK's offer is below our expectations and that it risks worsening the situation of citizens. But it will be for our negotiation team to analyse the offer line by line once we receive it on paper.feedback

Andrew Myors

Coming here you realise how much of a phenomenon Corbyn is. And it isn't just one type of person who's here and joining in these songs – he's united all these people who come to Glastonbury to watch completely different genres of music. And it's such a different vibe from last year. I definitely don't think there were many people singing 'woop Brexit' chants at Shangri La.feedback

Alain De Botton

Cabinet minister tells me Conservatives ready to accept EEA with 5 year immigration brake. Will be offered after German elections.feedback

David Edward

By any standards, some of the Brexit legislation would normally require LCMs. But you never know what the intelligentsia of the Tory party may deem to be within their exclusive competences. After all, they want power to amend primary legislation by executive order. Charles I is not dead yet!feedback

Peter Hennessy

The recent general election was our means of absorbing the outcome of our 2016 eruption of plebiscitory democracy into the promiscuous, free-flowing mainstream of our system of representative democracy.feedback

Donald Tusk - European Council

Politics without dreams would be a nightmare … miracles do happen. The best part of politics is that everything is possible.feedback

Dave Spokes

We find it bizarre that she expects the EU to reciprocate to her offer which falls short of their own. Does she expect the EU to water down its offer to match hers? This is not a negotiation to get the lowest possible price. It is, or should be, a negotiation to gain the best support for real people - a country's citizens. We are not surprised that Mr Juncker has described Theresa May's offer on citizens rights as 'not sufficient.feedback

Jane Golding

At this stage, I think it [the British offer] raises more questions than it answers. There are some broad lines of the offer set out, but whether the status quo and the full bundle of rights that EU citizens in the UK currently have will be safeguarded is not clear from this statement. So without answers to those questions, we simply don't know yet whether the PM is offering certainty to EU citizens.feedback

Dave Spokes

This reflects our own assessment. It seems a very odd strategy for the UK to offer less support for citizens than that being offered by the EU. Should they not be encouraging the EU to give more?feedback

Nicolas Hatton

It's disgusting. They do not want to engage with EU citizens. It's like one big game to them, but these are people's lives. Barnier and the EU, they also play political games and like good PR, but they have listened to us and redrafted their proposal after they sent it round to the EU27 because of the feedback they got. The UK seems to be stuck in this Home Office policy of creating a hostile environment.feedback

Paul Mumford - Cavendish Asset Management

Brexit itself, I don't think, has had much of an effect on the market, but what has had an effect has been the fall in sterling. Because of the uncertainty that might have arisen from the election result, it may be that sterling is going to stay down longer than we thought.feedback

Theresa May

I want to reassure all those EU citizens who are in the UK, who've made their lives and homes in the UK that no one will have to leave, we won't be seeing families split apart. This is a fair and serious offer. And I want to give those EU citizens in the UK certainty about the future of their lives but I also want to see that certainty given to UK citizens who are living in the European Union.feedback

Theresa May

No one will face a cliff edge. The UK's position represents a fair and serious offer, one aimed at giving as much certainty as possible to citizens who have settled in the UK, building careers and lives and contributing so much to our society.feedback

Barnaby Joyce

I will argue that the Europeans should embrace an FTA with Australia. European farmers have nothing to fear from improved trade with Australia as we are not in a position to swamp their markets.feedback

Barnaby Joyce

Long before the European Union, Australia had a strong relationship with exports to the United Kingdom and we never lose sight of that – apart from always wanting with all countries to expand trade.feedback

Barnaby Joyce

We can, however, deliver high-quality premium products to meet clear market demand.feedback

Barnaby Joyce

When a couple gets divorced, I don't choose a side, I keep talking to both.feedback

Charles Michel

It's time for action and certainty. Not for dreams and uncertainty #Brexit #FutureofEurope. Theresa May is in a very difficult situation in terms of leadership so we will have to see what position Great Britain will defend. We can speculate, but it is a waste of time.feedback

David Mundell

We're very clear that the United Kingdom is the member state of the EU and while we will work very closely, as we have throughout, with the Scottish Government it will be the United Kingdom Government that will be conducting the negotiations.feedback

Sadiq Khan

The prime minister sought a mandate from the British people for her version of hard Brexit - but the electorate registered their opposition. It's time she heeded the message. The Brexit goalposts have been moved. The government must now listen to the will of the people by putting aside ideology and negotiating a sensible Brexit that ensures continued membership of the single market.feedback

Kristin Forbes

The exchange rate - no surprise – seems to be much more sensitive to political news, and news especially related to Brexit announcements. That's not to say monetary policy doesn't matter. But those effects do seem recently to be dwarfed by other factors.feedback

Donald Tusk - European Council

We can hear different predictions, coming from different people, about the possible outcome of these negotiations: hard Brexit, soft Brexit or no deal. The European Union was built on dreams that seemed impossible to achieve. So, who knows? You may say I'm a dreamer, but I am not the only one.feedback

Mark Rutte

We all have that dream. I hate Brexit from every angle. My dream would be... we would come to a sort of intermediate end state for the coming years in which the United Kingdom would stay connected to the single market.feedback

Ian Blackford

There are two things I'd say to Theresa May and her government: there needs to be meeting of the joint ministerial committee so the parliament in London meeting together with the governments of Belfast, of Edinburgh and Cardiff. And of course it is right – and many people have said this – that the Scottish Government should be represented at the talks in Brussels.feedback

Beat Wittmann

U.K. voters will only wake up to the cost of Brexit once the debt-fueled expansion ends and businesses start to relocate away from the country. Gilts (U.K. government bonds) are more of a question of the reflation trade which has a global dimension so that's probably not so attractive and (U.K.) equities are fine. I think the main casualty will be pound sterling.feedback

Laith Khalaf - Hargreaves Lansdown

Inflation is gradually ratcheting up the pressure on consumers. Dixons Carphone, Travis Perkins and Berkeley Group are three companies who can attribute a large part of their relegation from the benchmark FTSE 100 index to concerns over consumer demand stemming from Brexit.feedback

Emmanuel Macron

The door is open until the moment you walk through it. It's not up to me to say it's closed. But from the moment things are engaged with a timescale and an objective, it's very hard to go back, we can't lie to ourselves. What did Brexit play on? On workers from eastern Europe who came to take British jobs. The defenders of the European Union lost because the British lower middle classes said: 'Stop!feedback

Emmanuel Macron

Europe is not a supermarket. We have to promote a Europe that goes toward greater economic and social wellbeing. Europe isn't a supermarket. Europe is a common destiny. It is weakened when it accepts its principles being rejected. The countries in Europe that don't respect the rules should have to face the political consequences. And that's not just an east-west debate. Everything is linked. You can't say you want to lead an effective fight against terror and not do something about climate change.feedback

Nicolas Hatton

There is something slightly pathetic about the prime minister's proposal which makes no reference to the detailed, comprehensive offer tabled by the EU. The prime minister described her proposal as fair and serious. It's neither fair nor serious.feedback

Nicola Sturgeon

Brexit will change Scotland and the UK fundamentally - and an extreme Brexit, such as the one the UK government still seems intent on pursuing, will maximise the damage. But the immediate priority for action is to work with anyone and everyone - including the UK government, and other political parties - to ensure that the UK as a whole adopts the least damaging approach possible. The UK government placed a great deal of emphasis on restricting freedom of movement. That seems to be the key reason why it is not pursuing single market membership.feedback

Michael Gove

I was talking to two representatives of the Scottish government yesterday, Fergus Ewing and Roseanna Cunningham, and I had a very cordial conversation with them. I think there is a change in the atmosphere. In the past, the Scottish government preferred grandstanding and showboating to actual constructive engagement. We now have an opportunity for a more constructive approach, and judging from the conversations that I had yesterday I think we are moving into a new phase.feedback

Nick Clegg

[They are also] the owners and editors of the rightwing press, whose visceral loathing of the EU has shaped their respective papers' tone and coverage for decades; the Tory backbenchers, many of whom still inhabit a preposterous past in which Britannia still rules the waves and diplomacy is best conducted from the royal yacht; a handful of multi-millionaire businessmen who have, in some cases over 30 years or more, bankrolled whichever party, or politician, stands on the most aggressive EU-bashing platform.feedback

Nick Clegg

The UK stands alone as a rich economy that experienced a strong economic recovery in which the real wages of workers fell.feedback

Nick Clegg

Populism has not been defeated in mainland Europe, but it does appears to have been contained. We were told a few months ago that [Geert] Wilders would win in the Netherlands, that Le Pen would take the [French] presidency and pull France out of the euro, and that Angela Merkel's position was in doubt. None of those things have happened. Yet in Britain, a revolution overturned four decades of EU membership, and in the US a completely unsuitable candidate was elected president.feedback

Nick Clegg

A disastrous collapse, an extension to the timescale, or a significant softening of the government's negotiating stance to allow a generous transition period in which many of the features of EU membership continue to apply.feedback

Nick Clegg

Far from increasing our standing in Washington or Beijing, the decision to leave the EU is already seen as a sign of Britain's decline, pushing us to the margins in international affairs.feedback

Nick Clegg

Mainstream politicians of all stripes are failing to deliver on the bread and butter issues that matter to voters. The housing problem in particular has been festering for years, with social housing in decline, too little affordable housing, skyrocketing rents, and an over-reliance on a dysfunctional private sector that has not built enough homes, and not enough good-quality homes.feedback

Frances O'Grady

We have spent the last year fighting for the best Brexit deal for working people – one that protects their jobs and their rights at work. A no-deal Brexit would be devastating for jobs and the UK economy – and after the election result, the prime minister has no mandate for it.feedback

Frances O'Grady

A good Brexit deal for working people means tariff-free and barrier-free trade with Europe. And it means a level playing field for workers' rights written into the Brexit deal. That deal must protect all current rights and make sure hardworking Brits do not miss out on new protections enjoyed by EU workers in future.feedback

Laith Khalaf - Hargreaves Lansdown

All of the top 10 performing stocks have significant international earnings which have helped propel their stock price performance thanks to weaker sterling. There are other factors at play too however; for instance commodity producers Glencore and Antofagasta have benefited from price rises in the stuff they dig out of the ground.feedback

Richard Gowan - European Council

Yet the vote also reflects Brexit Britain's perilous diplomatic position. The fact that most E.U. members abstained rather than backing the U.K. highlights its isolation.feedback

Doug Parr - Greenpeace

A lobby group led by Tory grandees and backed by high-profile government figures was preparing to undermine building regulations, including crucial fire safety standards, just weeks before the Grenfell disaster. It's obvious that there are powerful political and corporate interests out there ready to use Brexit as an excuse to get rid of vital laws that they see as a hindrance to businesses. But what industry lobbyists call 'red tape' are often rules that save lives and protect our health and our environment.feedback

Mark Rutte

I am an Anglophile. You are one of our most beloved partners, so I hate Brexit from every angle. But you can't argue with democracy.feedback

John Hardman

The grim reality is that the perception from overseas is we are xenophobic, we're racist, and the pound has plummeted too. We've gone with Brexit and that makes us look unfriendly. The immediate impact is that there will be crops left in the fields. [The warning] couldn't be more timely with Wimbledon around the corner as 99.9% of Wimbledon strawberries are picked by eastern Europeans.feedback

Mark Rutte

Yeah, we all have that dream. I hate Brexit from every angle. But this is a sovereign decision by the British people and I can't argue with democracy.feedback

Charles Michel

I am NOT a dreamer and I'm not the only one. It's time for action and certainty. Not for dreams and uncertainty.feedback

Tania Branigan

With more beards than females and no ethnic minority members, the UK team negotiating our leaving the EU will not reap the benefits diversity brings. There is nothing shocking about the photos of the UK’s Brexit negotiating team. They are almost exactly as you would expect. Somehow, it is normal that a team working on behalf of 65 million people should contain no person of colour and “more beards than women” – an indication not of hipster tendencies in the civil service, but of the fact there is just one female member among the nine. These are the people charged with fulfilling Theresa May’s promise that “as we leave the European Union … we will make Britain a country that works not for a privileged few, but for every one of us”.feedback

Andrew Sentance - PricewaterhouseCoopers

Brexit discussions have started this week, but the impact of the EU referendum result on most households in the UK has been to squeeze both their incomes and spending. Employment growth continues to be quite robust, however, so that offers a countervailing positive influence on the prospects for consumer spending.feedback

David Blanchflower

Steady as she goes isn't what is happening. It matters to the central bank and all of us that there is no credible government and no dependable fiscal authority. We have no clue what economic policies the government will implement and whether failed austerity is dead and buried. It should be.feedback

Donald Tusk - European Council

We need real guarantees for our people who live, work and study in the UK, and the same goes for Brits.feedback

Hugh Dennis

Exams are no easier now than they were back then. There's also this perception that boys don't do as good as girls. I think the honest truth of it is that girls are more intelligent than boys. Boys from seven through to 80, then they catch up.feedback

Philip Hammond

When you buy a house you don't necessarily move all your furniture in on the first day you buy it. This is a process. People will expect us to put in place arrangements that will allow us to move from where we were when we were members [of the EU] to where we are going to be in a long term future partnership with our EU neighbours. But we will do that as part of a process that will avoid a cliff edge.feedback

Ellie Kendrick

Obviously it was before Brexit that we filmed it. But it became even more relevant afterwards. They're a portion of society that are being really affected by what's happening politically.feedback

Jeffrey Donaldson

Those figures would not recognise the fiscal reality in the United Kingdom today. We recognise the realities we're dealing with. The reason for that is we want to bring Northern Ireland up to the same level as the rest of the UK. We believe that in a post-Brexit world, we want the rising tide to lift all the boats, and we want Northern Ireland to benefit from that. If what we do benefits people across the United Kingdom then, as a unionist party, that's something we're proud of.feedback

Thomas Steffen

The decision by the United Kingdom to leave the EU is unfortunate. The Brexit process could also bring opportunities for a stronger EU and for Germany as a business location.feedback

Matt Shardlow

Conservative politicians have repeatedly led the charge to face down measures to restrict harmful pesticides. Buglife would like to see a clear commitment from the Conservatives that after Brexit our environment and health will be in safe hands. It is time to start listening to the people and respecting the experts.feedback

Laurence Olins

This is as extreme as it gets. If we do not have the pickers, we do not have a soft fruit industry. It is inconceivable that people who voted to leave the European Union wanted to destroy an iconic and incredibly competitive British horticulture industry, and see the end of buying British produce. But if we cannot ensure access to the seasonal workers needed to produce soft fruit in Britain, that will be an unintended consequence of Brexit - along with soaring prices and increased reliance on imports.feedback

David Mundell

This Queen's Speech is about bringing our United Kingdom closer together and fully grasping the opportunities ahead for the whole country as we leave the EU. We will bring powers back in a way that works best for Scotland and the rest of the UK. There will undoubtedly be more decision-making powers coming to Holyrood, and I look forward to working closely with the Scottish Government on this.feedback

Michel Barnier

The UK has asked to leave the EU, not the other way around, so we each have to assume the consequences of our decisions and the consequences are substantial. I am not in a frame of mind to make concessions or ask for concessions. We are looking to unravel 43 years of patiently built relations.feedback

Phil Jones

The trouble with standing in the middle of a roundabout is it's a quick way to gauge opinion but it doesn't allow you to engage with people or understand what people's feelings are and I think there are lot of general concerns.feedback

Phil Jones

I think reactions to my posts have been really wonderful. I call it my one-man protest standing in solidarity (with them) and I really mean it.feedback

Phil Jones

Yes I do think there is a lack of education and it's been going on for 40 years. In this country certain sections of the press have only ever produced negative material about the EU. They have only ever focussed on the problems.feedback

Phil Jones

It is hard to feel a sense of belonging to something if you know very little about it. And also if you know very little about it, then you are open to being manipulated.feedback

Emmanuel Macron

Because democracy was born in Europe. The US likes freedom as much as we do, but it doesn't have our love for justice. Europe is the only place in the world where individual freedoms, the spirit of democracy and social justice are so closely joined. So the question now is: Will Europe succeed in defending the deep values it brought to the world for decades, or will it be wiped out by the rise in illiberal democracies and authoritarian regimes?feedback

Emmanuel Macron

France is not a country that you reform, it's a country that you transform, a country of revolution. So as long as it's possible not to reform, France doesn't do it. This time, people saw they were at the edge of a precipice and they reacted.feedback

Emmanuel Macron

I respect Vladimir Putin. I had an constructive exchange with him. We have real disagreements, on Ukraine in particular, but he has seen my position. I talked to him at length face to face about international issues as wells as defending NGOs and liberties in his country.feedback

Emmanuel Macron

The question is to know how to restore the dynamic and bring people on board. It's not just about pressing policy onto countries or people; you have to be able to bring them along with you, make them dream.feedback

Emmanuel Macron

That's why I have asked the government to engage the fundamental reforms which are essential for France. Our credibility, our efficiency, our strength is on the line.feedback

Emmanuel Macron

I will speak to everyone with respect but I won't compromise on European principles – on solidarity or democratic values. If Europe were to accept that, it would mean it's weak and had already ceased to exist.feedback

Emmanuel Macron

Fears are still there and what divides societies is still there. There are no magic solutions, it's a combat for every day.feedback

Emmanuel Macron

We have to promote a Europe that goes towards greater economic and social wellbeing. Let's not get this wrong. The great defenders of this ultra economically-liberal and unbalanced Europe – the UK – came crashing down on this. What did Brexit play on? On workers from eastern Europe who came to take British jobs. The defenders of the European Union lost because the British lower middle classes said: 'Stop!' He said "extremes feed off imbalances like this" and the European Union couldn't remain shut up in summits and offices and "let things crumble.feedback

Emmanuel Macron

Anyone who thinks the fight against climate change is mere whim by middle-class liberals is deeply wrong.feedback

Emmanuel Macron

Democracy isn't built from the outside without the people. France didn't take part in the Iraq war and that was right. And France was wrong to take part in the war in Libya in the way it did. What was the result of those interventions? Failed states where terrorist groups prospered. I don't want that in Syria. Three: I have red lines on chemical weapons and humanitarian corridors. I said it very clearly to Vladimir Putin. I will be uncompromising on that. So the use of chemical weapons will be met with a response, and even if France acts alone.feedback

Emmanuel Macron

My election, and my majority in parliament are not the end of something: they are a challenging beginning. It's the start of a French renaissance, and I hope a European one.feedback

Emmanuel Macron

Everywhere in our societies, the lower middle classes have started to doubt. We have to create a Europe that protects with a real defence policy and common security.feedback

Emmanuel Macron

When you look at the planet today, what do you see? A rise in illiberal democracies, and extremes in Europe, a reappearance of authoritarian regimes that question the vitality of democracy, and the US in part withdrawing from the world. That context is worsened by a rise in uncertainty and troubles – crises are growing in the Middle East and the Gulf, inequalities are growing everywhere in the world.feedback

Emmanuel Macron

National egotisms are slow poisons that bring about the weakening of democracies and a collective inability to rise up to our historic challenge. I know the German chancellor, Angela Merkel, is conscious of that.feedback

Emmanuel Macron

Yes. When you fix red-lines, if you don't know how to make sure they are respected, you're choosing to be weak. That's not my choice. If chemical weapons are used on the ground and we know how to find out their provencance, France will launch strikes to destroy the chemical weapons stocks.feedback

Emmanuel Macron

I want the discussions that have just started to be perfectly coordinated at a European level. I do not want bilateral discussions, because the interests of the EU must be preserved in the short, medium and long term.feedback

Emmanuel Macron

I want our cooperation to evolve. We absolutely must avoid creating new flashpoint migrant camps.feedback

Michael Russell

There can be absolutely no question of the UK Government attempting to reserve powers in devolved areas – and the Scottish Government would not recommend the Scottish Parliament consents to such proposals. It is deeply concerning that the UK Government seems to intend that repatriated powers in devolved areas like agriculture should go by default to Westminster, with no clear recognition of the need for the consent of the Scottish Parliament. This is clearly unacceptable.feedback

Tom Stringfellow - Frost Investment Advisors

The Bank of England remains on hold for a few obvious reasons (Brexit), although they have also noted increasing concerns that inflationary pressures were taking hold in the British economy.feedback

Ross Campbell

The hung parliament increases the uncertainty associated with Brexit, while also diverting resources and attention away from the economy. This could negatively impact the health of the public finances. As a result, and in order to deliver credible fiscal plans, it's important that government puts strong financial leadership at the top of its priority list.feedback

Polly Toynbee

This is the impasse parliament – nothing can be done by a rudderless government immobilised by a toxic combination of state shrinkers and Europhobes. No gold carriage, no content worth the vellum it’s written on, nothing much to see here; move on. But where to? The Black Rod absurdity of the Queen’s speech flummery does nothing to disguise a rudderless country in the depth of crises unseen since the war as two Conservative-made disasters flap home to roost – Brexit and the great austerity.feedback

Damian Green

There's still the possibility, there's every possibility of a DUP deal. The talks have been taking place in a constructive way. Clearly, two political parties, we have some differences. But we have a lot in common. We're both unionist parties at our heart. We're both obviously very concerned with combating terrorism, we both have similar views about delivering a good Brexit for this country and obviously, we're both very, very concerned with the Irish border issue. But all talks of this kind take a long time, and they're still continuing.feedback

Mike Hawes

We accept that we are leaving the European Union and we share the desire for that departure to be a success. But our biggest fear is that, in two years' time, we fall off a cliff edge – no deal, outside the single market and customs union and trading on inferior WTO terms. This would undermine our competitiveness and our ability to attract the investment that is critical to future growth.feedback

Damian Green

As people will see today, this is not a thin Queen's speech. Apart from all the Brexit elements there's huge domestic elements, about the economy, about infrastructure, about fighting injustices, helping people and all of that.feedback

Boris Johnson

You have seen it in the way news has reacted over the last year. Ms Biggins' cat run over, Brexit. Your neighbour moves house, Brexit. House prices are up, Brexit. House price down, Brexit.feedback

Boris Johnson

Everything is ascribed to Brexit. There will be bumps in the road and the plaster will come off the ceiling from time to time. And there will be excitable headlines, but we will end up in a very good place.feedback

Theresa May

While this will be a Government that consults and listens, we are clear that we are going to see Brexit through, working with Parliament, business, the devolved administrations and others to ensure a smooth and orderly withdrawal. 'The Tories' election disaster shows they have no mandate for a hard Brexit and yet it looks like they are going to be the bogged down in their own Brexit mess.feedback

Mark Carney - Bank of England

Those costs would ultimately be passed on to European households and businesses. Fragmentation is in no one's economic interest. Nor is it necessary for financial stability. Indeed it can damage it.feedback

Boris Johnson

I think nobody wants to see that and this is what the Prime Minister has said and what everybody I speak to wants is calm, Government getting on and not just delivering Brexit, but all the priorities of the people, that's what we've got to do.feedback

Mark Carney - Bank of England

From my perspective, given the mixed signals on consumer spending and business investment, and given the still subdued domestic inflationary pressures, in particular anaemic wage growth, now is not yet the time to begin [an] adjustment [in monetary policy]. In the coming months, I would like to see the extent to which weaker consumption growth is offset by other components of demand, whether wages begin to firm, and more generally, how the economy reacts to the prospect of tighter financial conditions and the reality of Brexit negotiations.feedback

Philip Hammond

I have said before, and I remain clear today, that when the British people voted last June, they did not vote to become poorer, or less secure. They did vote to leave the EU. And we will leave the EU. But it must be done in a way that works for Britain. In a way that prioritises British jobs, and underpins Britain's prosperity. Anything less will be a failure to deliver on the instructions of the British people.feedback

Benoit Coeure - European Central Bank

The safety and soundness of central counterparties (CCPs) matters for central banks, and it matters a lot. What concerns us today in the context of Brexit is that the current EU regime regarding third-country CCPs was never designed to cope with major systemic CCPs operating from outside the EU. Indeed, this regime relies to a large extent on local supervision, and provides EU authorities with very limited tools for obtaining information and taking action in the event of a crisis.feedback

George Soros

The moment of truth is fast approaching. The fact is that Brexit is a lose-lose proposition, harmful both to Britain and the European Union. It cannot be undone, but people can change their minds.feedback

Anne Applebaum

LONDON - “Regulation” is a boring word with unpleasant connotations, especially in Britain. Schools, offices and governments have regulations. British students, employees and businesses seek to get around regulations. Regulations are thought to cost money, time and effort, preventing people from engaging in more productive activity. One of the most important arguments against the European Union in Britain during the Brexit referendum campaign last year was that the E.U. is widely believed to be a source of time-wasting regulations.feedback

Mike Hawes

The greatest threat to that progress is Brexit. To leave in 2019 without a deal would put the industry in peril, defaulting to WTO tariffs and customs barriers would damage our industry permanently.feedback

Mark Carney - Bank of England

Any development which prevented EU27 firms from continuing to clear trades in the UK would split liquidity between a less liquid onshore market for EU firms and a more liquid offshore market for everyone else. The European Commission's proposals announced last week recognize the importance of effective cooperation arrangements between the relevant EU authorities and their overseas counterparts.feedback

Philip Hammond

Fragmentation of financial services would result in poorer quality, higher priced products for everyone concerned. Third, these arrangements must be permanent and reliable for the businesses regulated under these regimes.feedback

Philip Hammond

We saw such a concern articulated in the EU's proposal on supervision of CCPs last week. We must, and we will, engage with all genuine concerns.feedback

Vince Cable - Stansted Airport

I am ready to commit my energy, enthusiasm and experience to the task of leading the Liberal Democrats through what will be a period of chronic uncertainty. With the prospect of another election looming large, we must be ready for the fight. With the economy approaching the Brexit iceberg, Liberal Democrats need more than ever to warn of the dangers ahead and the need for a new course. There are big opportunities ahead. The Conservatives are in disarray and in retreat. The Labour Party outperformed expectations but complacently believes that 'one more heave' will see it into office.feedback

Mark Carney - Bank of England

The UK houses some of the world's largest CCPs (central counterparty clearing houses). Fragmentation of such global markets by jurisdiction or currency would reduce the benefits of central clearing. Any development which prevented EU27 firms from continuing to clear trades in the UK would split liquidity between a less liquid onshore market for EU firms and a more liquid offshore market for everyone else.feedback

Mark Carney - Bank of England

It would be all too easy to give in to protectionism. But as we learned in the 1930s, that road leads neither to equity nor prosperity. Raising barriers to trade disproportionately hurts the least well off through higher prices and fewer opportunities.feedback

Philip Hammond

Just as the British people understand the benefits of trade - so, too, they understand how important it is to business to be able to access global talent and to move individuals around their organizations. Let's be honest, we are already hearing protectionist agendas being advanced, disguised as arguments about regulatory competence, financial stability, and supervisory oversight. We can have no truck with that approach.feedback

Mark Carney - Bank of England

Before long, we will all begin to find out the extent to which Brexit is a gentle stroll along a smooth path to a land of cake and consumption. Monetary policy cannot prevent the weaker real income growth likely to accompany the transition to new trading arrangements with the EU. Given the mixed signals on consumer spending and business investment, and given the still subdued domestic inflationary pressures, in particular anaemic wage growth, now is not yet the time to begin that adjustment.feedback

Sadiq Khan

The government must urgently get a grip on this health emergency and introduce a new Clean Air Act that takes air pollution seriously, plus a national diesel scrappage fund and reforms to vehicle excise duty. But given that much of the toxic pollution today in London is being blown over from the continent, we must continue to work closely with our neighbours to reduce emissions across Europe, even after Brexit.feedback

Theresa May

The election result was not the one I hoped for, but this Government will respond with humility and resolve to the message the electorate sent. We will work hard every day to gain the trust and confidence of the British people, making their priorities our priorities. While this will be a Government that consults and listens, we are clear that we are going to see Brexit through, working with Parliament, business, the devolved administrations and others to ensure a smooth and orderly withdrawal.feedback

Frances O'Grady

Theresa May failed to win a mandate at the ballot box for her no-deal Brexit. Instead, we need a Brexit deal that puts jobs and rights at work first.feedback

Nicolas Hatton

If the registration process is not going to entitle them to residency, they won't do it. People will be sceptical and think it will be used to foul their applications. They just won't bother to register – they will see it as pointless.feedback

Peter Hain

Although I think that Keir Starmer is doing a brilliant job, there is a massive appetite in the country for protecting jobs and prosperity through retaining membership of the single market, [and] that is what we should prioritise. I'm confident we can get a deal to restrict EU migrants to just those who work.feedback

Chuka Umunna

We desperately want to mount the strongest possible opposition to the Tories' nasty, extreme Brexit. Loads of Labour voters – particularly new, young voters – expect us not to go along with the Tories' negotiating strategy but to argue for a more socially just alternative.feedback

Michel Barnier

Return this weekend to the Savoy country to draw the strength and energy that long hikes require.feedback

David Davis

The UK wants to build a deep and special partnership with the EU.feedback

Martha Gill

The Conservatives are letting May take the flak for the election, Brexit and Grenfell Tower before she is ruthlessly disposed of. Labour has a duty to shake things up. Theresa May can’t be enjoying her job very much at the moment. Her personal poll ratings have dived, protesters bay for her resignation, and the rightwing press has turned on her with a single-mindedness once reserved for promoting her campaign slogans and trashing her opponents.feedback

Mike Hawes

The needle is shifting more towards British content, but we are a long way from the 50-60% shelf for most free trade agreements. We need to have arrangements where EU content counts as UK and vice versa – that should also allow us to take advantage of free trade arrangements with the 30-40 other countries that the EU has.feedback

Mike Hawes

We must have the no-tariff, frictionless trade upon which the industry depends.feedback

Michel Barnier

The United Kingdom will no longer enjoy the same rights and advantages as EU member states … I am convinced that this new partnership will contribute to stability on our continent.feedback

David Davis

It is not when it starts, it is how it finishes. Nothing is agreed until everything is agreed. The position we have agreed today is completely consistent with our long-standing position we have set out on article 50.feedback

Philip Hammond

Our departure from the EU is under way. But ensuring that it happens via a smooth pathway to a deep and special future partnership with our EU neighbours, one that protects jobs, prosperity, and living standards in Britain will require every ounce of skill and diplomacy. ...Yesterday was a positive start. It will get tougher. But we are ready for the challenge.feedback

David Madden - IG Asia

Carney doesn't want to be seen as reacting too quickly (to Brexit) - he's also fully aware the UK hasn't left the EU yet and he wants to keep his monetary policy loose on the off chance that the UK doesn't get an amazing deal.feedback

Michel Barnier

So, we each have to assume our responsibility and the consequences of our decisions. And the consequences are substantial. For both the European Union and the United Kingdom, a fair deal is possible and far better than no deal. That is what I said to David today. That's why we will work all the time with the UK and never against the UK. There will be no hostility on my side.feedback

Philip Hammond

Fragmentation of financial services would result in poorer quality, higher priced products for everyone concerned. First (Other OTC: FSTC - news) , we will need a new process for establishing regulatory requirements for cross-border business between the UK and EU. It must be evidence-based, symmetrical, and transparent. And it must reflect international standards. Second, cooperation arrangements must be reciprocal, reliable, and prioritise financial stability. Crucially they must enable timely and coordinated risk management on both sides.feedback

Mark Carney - Bank of England

Most fundamentally, the UK relies on the kindness of strangers at a time when risks to trade, investment, and financial fragmentation have increased.feedback

Mark Carney - Bank of England

On the positive side, the deficit is funded in domestic currency and financial reforms have increased the resilience of the UK system, thereby making larger imbalances more sustainable. But the UK's deficit has also been associated with markedly weak investment and latterly with rapid consumer credit growth. This is not an imbalance that is, as yet, funding its eventual resolution.feedback

Mike van Dulken - Accendo Markets

A positive opening call comes after US bourses closed higher (more Dow and S&P records) thanks to a Tech resurgence suggesting the recent sector sell-off may have been more 'tech check' than the 'tech wreck' some had forecast. A solid start to Brexit negotiations also calmed political nerves along with latest polling data putting Merkel's Conservatives 11.5pts ahead of Social Democrat rivals 3-months before German elections that could deliver another anti-populist result.feedback

Mike Hawes

We have asked for clarity and certainty. The general election has not brought that clarity. It has added confusion. This uncertainty cannot be allowed to drag on – and drag British industry down with it. Nor will we be satisfied with vague talk of a 'transition' or 'implementation' period. Instead, we need a clear interim arrangement – an arrangement enabling 'business as usual' from day one.feedback

Carla Fendi

We had to work twice as hard as men to establish ourselves.feedback

Carolyn Fairbairn - Confederation of British Industry

The UK economy has proved hardy in recent times, with firms up and down the UK getting on with what they do best by investing and creating jobs. Growth should be steady, if restrained, over the next couple of years as the pace of the economy shifts down a gear. While the country's exporters should emerge as a real catalyst of growth, rising inflation and stubbornly low wage growth mean that people are already starting to feel the pinch. Tighter purse strings mean slower household spending growth and uncertainty is likely to weigh on the minds of those making major investment decisions.feedback

Boris Johnson

The most important thing now is for us to look to the horizon. Think about the future. Think about the new partnership, the deep and special partnership that we want to build with our friends.feedback

Michael Barnier

I am not in a frame of mind to make concessions, or ask for concessions. It's not about punishment. It is not about revenge. Basically, we are implementing the decision taken by the United Kingdom to leave the European Union, and unravel 43 years of patiently-built relations.feedback

Phillip Souta - Clifford Chance

The election result increased the probability of extreme outcomes. If there is going to be a deal, it makes it more likely to be softer than before the election–but, on the other hand, the probability of no deal at all has increased.feedback

Michael Barnier

I will do all I can to put emotion to one side and stick to the facts, the figures, and the legal basis.feedback

Dennis Davitt - Harvest Volatility Management

Once the VIX is below 10, I find there's a really good opportunity to put hedges on my overall portfolio. With the talks kicking off in the Brexit conversations, this should be a really interesting tell as to how smooth they are going.feedback

David Davis

The same arguments apply, but also because that's the only way we can develop our free trade arrangements with the rest of the world and that is a major up-side for Britain.feedback

David Davis

Because the membership of the single market requires the four freedoms to be obeyed, we need to bring back to the UK control of our laws of our borders. We will leave the single market and be seeking to set up a free trade arrangement and a customs agreement. Similarly we will be leaving the Customs Union.feedback

Michel Barnier

The UK will no longer have the same rights and the same advantages as the EU member states. However I am convinced that it is our common interest to establish a new partnership among the 27 and the UK. I'm convinced that this partnership will contribute to the enduring stability of our continent. We are united among the 27 and the institutions for these negotiations.feedback

David Davis

This partnership will necessarily look and feel different from membership. But we hope that throughout our close cooperation on trade, and on security will continue as we tackle the the challenges of this and future generations together. There is no doubt the road ahead will be challenging, but as Winston Churchill said 'The pessimist sees difficulty in every opportunity. The optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.' And I am certainly an optimist.feedback

Michel Barnier

I will do all I can to put emotion to one side and stick to the facts, the figures, and the legal basis, and work with the United Kingdom to find an agreement in that frame of mind.feedback

Carolyn Fairbairn - Confederation of British Industry

The idea of the joint problem solving that a team of all talents could do has been proven around the world, so again it's another thing to just get on and do.feedback

Carolyn Fairbairn - Confederation of British Industry

They have confidential and formal structures and we have been calling for exactly that here. I think that we're seeing real signs of progress actually.feedback

Michel Barnier

If you like walking in the mountains, you have to learn a certain number of rules, you have to learn to put one foot in front of the other because sometimes you are on a steep and rocky path. You also have to look at what accidents might befall you, falling rocks, you have to be very careful to keep your breath, you have to have stamina because it could be a lengthy path and you have to keep looking at the summit.feedback

Patrick Pouyanne - Total

We'd like to begin, if you will, by discussing the situation in the middle East. As you know, Saudi Arabia and the Arab Emirates have broken off their diplomatic relations with Qatar. This is a region of the world in which you do business and in which you are active. If this diplomatic crisis deteriorated, would it begin to impact your organisation?feedback

George Buckley - Deutsche Bank

Should it last, the Government will likely find itself in the position of having to be more conciliatory on policy, particularly with respect to the Budget and Brexit. But reconciling the dramatically opposing views of the Eurosceptic and Europhile wings of the Conservative Party (and parliament more generally), while at the same time negotiating with the European Union will be a difficult juggling act.feedback

Michel Barnier

You have to be very careful to keep your breath, you have to have stamina because it could be a lengthy path. And you have to keep looking at the summit, the outcome. That's what I learnt when mountain-walking.feedback

Michel Barnier

Our objective is clear. We must first tackle the uncertainties caused by Brexit, first for citizens but also for the beneficiaries of the EU policies, and for the impact on borders, in particular Ireland. I hope that today we can identify priorities and a timetable that would allow me to report to the European Council later this week that we had a constructive opening of negotiations.feedback

David Davis

It is at testing times like these that we are reminded of the values and the resolve that we share with our closest allies in Europe. There is more that unites us than divides us. While there will undoubtedly be challenging times ahead of us in the negotiations we will do all that we can to ensure that we deliver a deal that works in the best interests of all citizens.feedback

Ray Attrill

Negotiations will still be towing the hard Brexit line but I wonder whether what we'll be seeing or hearing 2-3 months months down the tack will be different today....if markets get a sense of a softer Brexit, that will be positive for sterling.feedback

Stefan Auer

The elections were terrible for May but I don't think the fundamental dynamics of the Brexit negotiations will change because of that. The only possibility of a soft Brexit is if the EU itself fundamentally changes, if the EU allows member states to reclaim more control over their destiny, which is something I've advocated for many years.feedback

Niklas Östberg - Delivery Hero

The expected launch of our I.P.O. is an important and exciting next step for us. We will continue our successful journey as a listed company and will seek to further expand our global leadership position in the online food ordering and delivery market.feedback

Jesus Verdu

On one hand, Theresa May's political weakness could be beneficial because it would force more negotiating flexibility. The problem and what concerns us is that until now the position of Spain is very worrisome because it has used it more to impose a solution that everyone knows is not viable as that of co-sovereignty instead of using that position to look for a mutual beneficial solution for all parties.feedback

Boris Johnson

I think the whole process will lead to a happy resolution which can be done with honour and profit to both sides. Obviously this is the first day of the talks on Brexit and I think the most important thing is we should all start – of course there'll be lots of discussions about the nature of the deal we are going to do – but I think we should also enter on the discussion about money and so and so forth. But I think the most important think about us now is for us to look to the horizon.feedback

Sigmar Gabriel

Maybe there is now a chance to achieve a so-called 'soft Brexit'. We will negotiate fairly, and fair means that we want to keep the British as close as possible to the EU – but never at the price that we divide the remaining 27 EU states.feedback

Philip Hammond

It's a statement of common sense that if we are going to radically change the way we work together, we need to get there via a slope, not a cliff edge.feedback

David Davis

There's no doubt in my mind that this is right at the top of the priorities we need to resolve in this negotiation. It's not when it starts it's how it finishes that matters. The UK has been crystal clear in our approach to the negotiations, the withdrawal process cannot be concluded without the future relationship also being taken into account.feedback

Rain Newton-Smith - Confederation of British Industry

Even accounting for weaker growth at the start of 2017, the momentum from last year gives us more of a lift as we move ahead, and this explains our higher annual growth forecast relative to November. But very little has changed in our view of the nature of the outlook. Growth will be slower in the years ahead as living standards are hit by rising inflation; and after some initial strength, uncertainty will weigh on business investment.feedback

Muhammad Abdullah

It feels like you're under siege. I wonder, is anyone going to write about a 'white Christian terrorist' this time round? Since the 'Brexit' vote, things have been crazy. The spotlight is on minorities. The signal is, You're not wanted here.' People are allowed to say things they would have never said before.feedback

Michel Barnier

We must first tackle the uncertainties caused by Brexit – first, for citizens, but also for the beneficiaries of E.U. policies and for the impact on borders, in particular Ireland.feedback

Guy Verhofstadt

I am glad that we are sticking to the negotiating timetable, which is already quite tight. Let's now, first of all, make progress in the field of citizens' rights and create legal certainty for both our people and our companies.feedback

Fabian Zuleeg

The Europeans are very clear about their position on the Brexit talks, but it's very difficult to see any such clarity on the British side, since there might not even be the same government there in a few months' time. Any deal reached in Brussels might not even politically pass the British Parliament, and then we end up with a chaotic exit.feedback

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