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Last quote about NASA

Leanne Caret - The Boeing Company
We are continuing to look at other ways to increase our top line through mergers and acquisitions and we have a continued pipeline we're assessing. We'll stay away from that. We've seen very strong support for NASA and the program, and we continue to put our best and brightest on it. If you recall back a few years ago, when you would get on a train without a conductor, people would get a bit nervous. Now, it's just part of our natural routine.feedback
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Sep 22 2017
NASA has been commented on by 273 key people in the news. You can find all of them on this page with their statements. People who have been most quoted about NASA are: Linda Spilker, Glen Nagle, Sylvia Acevedo and Earl Maize. For instance, the most recent quote from Linda Spilker is: “That's Cassini. She's very hard-working, very diligent. And curious. Extremely curious. In that way, she's an extension of what we are.”.
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All quotes about NASA

Nick Pope - Deloitte

Nibiru doesn't exist. The world won't end on September 23. Shame on the people promoting this hoax in the name of evangelical Christianity. I'm certain Nibiru doesn't exist because if there really was a rogue planet heading for Earth, due to hit on Saturday, it would be visible to the naked naked eye by now. Furthermore, astronomers would have been aware of its presence for years, both through direct observation and through gravitational effects on other planets in the solar system.feedback

David Morrison

Its gravity would've messed up the orbits of the inner planets, the Earth, Venus, Mars, probably would've stripped the moon away completely. Instead, in the intersolar system, we see planets with stable orbits. We see the moon going around the Earth.feedback

David Morrison

Everything I've said would be worse with a massive object like a brown dwarf. That would've been tracked by astronomers for a decade or more, and it would already have really affected planetary objects.feedback

Ziyad Al-Aly

Data on the relationship between air pollution and kidney disease in humans has been scarce. However, once we analyzed the data, the link between air pollution and the development of kidney disease was clear. The beauty of using both EPA and NASA data is that the agencies used two distinct techniques for collecting data, yet the results were similar. This constellation of findings suggests that chronic exposure to air pollution is a significant risk factor for the development and progression of kidney disease.feedback

Ziyad Al-Aly

Air pollution is a previously unrecognized factor for kidney disease and kidney disease progression.feedback

Mike Moreau

We're essentially stealing a bit of the Earth's momentum as we go by. It would be a very small number.feedback

Leanne Caret - The Boeing Company

That includes looking organically on where we are going to invest. We'll stay away from that.feedback

Leanne Caret - The Boeing Company

We are continuing to look at other ways to increase our top line through mergers and acquisitions and we have a continued pipeline we're assessing.feedback

Samuel Paylor

It's really gratifying to know that the knowledge gained here from our mission and the other missions that HI-SEAS has done will contribute to the future exploration of Mars and the future exploration of Space in general.feedback

Lee Cronin

Everybody looks for 'biosignatures,' but they're meaningless because we don't have any other examples of biology.feedback

Jonathan Lunine

If you think of the spectrum like a set of venetian blinds, there are only a few slats removed. That's not a very good way to get at the composition.feedback

Jonathan Lunine

It's difficult to imagine that we could definitively find life on an exoplanet. But the outer solar system is accessible to us.feedback

Laura Lark

There are certainly technical challenges to be overcome. There are certainly human factors to be figured out. That's part of what HI-SEAS is for. But I think that overcoming those challenges is just a matter of effort. We are absolutely capable of it.feedback

David Morrison

The simplest thing to say is just that there is no credible evidence, whatever, for the existence of Nibiru. There are no pictures, there's no tracking, there's no astronomical observations… First, if there were a planet headed into the inner solar system that was going to come close to the Earth… it would already be inside the orbit of Mars. It would be bright, it would be easily visible to the naked eye. If it were up there you could see it. All of us could see it.feedback

Linda Spilker

That's Cassini. She's very hard-working, very diligent. And curious. Extremely curious. In that way, she's an extension of what we are.feedback

Linda Spilker

They've been with, in a certain sense, with the Cassini mission their whole lives, the launch, Saturn orbital insertion, and now the end of Cassini.feedback

Troy Shinbrot

However you do the experiment, there's going to be an inevitable big gap between how large an experiment can be – a meter, two meters – and tens of kilometers, which occur in earthquakes.feedback

Troy Shinbrot

It's a little bit difficult to ferret out what is a real one and what is not.feedback

Friedemann Freund - Nasa

The faster we stretch the rocks, the more of these positive-charge carriers are released.feedback

Friedemann Freund - Nasa

These phenomena are well documented because of so many security cameras running day and night now.feedback

Kim Binsted

This is our fifth mission, and we have learned a lot over those five missions. We've learned, for one thing, that conflict, even in the best of teams, is going to arise. So what's really important is to have a crew that, both as individuals and a group, is really resilient, is able to look at that conflict and come back from it. So the previous three missions, the four, eight and 12 month missions, those were primarily looking at crew cohesion and performance. On this mission and going forward we are looking at crew selection and composition.feedback

Doug Gillan

It was the people who built it who decided that this was going to happen. It wasn't Cassini, . Cassini doesn't have any sentience.feedback

Preston Dyches - Nasa

It's crushing me, all the stories calling Cassini's end of mission dying, suicide, death, brutal, killing ... No matter how brave and noble and responsible this ending is, people still want to make it a tragedy. Sure, anthropomorphize Cassini, but if it *were* a person, you'd not speak about its impending demise with such zeal.feedback

Peter Bedini

A nuclear quadcopter to look for life on Saturn's moon, Titan. Seems kind of straightforward. Or arbitrary.feedback

Elizabeth Turtle

In terms of what we're looking for on Saturn, it really hit exactly the sweet spot.feedback

Elizabeth Turtle

Ten years ago, they were kind of rare things that only enthusiasts experimented with. Now everyone can have a drone.feedback

Jonathan Lunine

Cassini gave us a big pointer to where we need to go to look for life. If we are interested in trying to find life beyond the Earth, that's the place we need to go, and we know how to do it.feedback

Linda Spilker

Until we go back, that's a very distant world now. The details of the rings, and those small moons snuggled in so close – those are all gone until we go back.feedback

W. Bruce Banerdt

It's a mission to map out the deep interior of Mars all the way down to the very center of the planet. It's like using a microscope instead of looking at it from across the room.feedback

Giuseppe Sarri

We want to go to Jupiter and explore its moons for two basic reasons, First to understand our solar system how it was built how it works, and second to see and understand the probability of having life outside our planet.feedback

Linda Spilker

I would want to know if the ocean of Enceladus is indeed inhabited rather than just habitable.feedback

Linda Spilker

The question is, what happened to the larger particles, how were they ground up into dust?feedback

Earl Maize

[The Cassini mission and its team] have left the world informed but still wondering. I couldn't ask for more.feedback

Jeffrey Cuzzi

Titan is of interest from the standpoint of exobiology, the formation of life. Now Enceladus also is because of its liquid ocean. The spacecraft was not sterilized. So we have to actually dispose of the spacecraft with prejudice.feedback

Linda Spilker

We've had an incredible 13-year journey around Saturn, returning data like a giant firehose, just flooding us with data. Almost like we've taken a magnifying glass to the planet and the rings.feedback

Morgan Cable

Deep down, I think I always hoped that life exists out there somewhere, and I really hope that we find it in our lifetime. It's just a matter of continuing to look, being persistent. Following the clues that missions like Cassini leave for us.feedback

Linda Spilker

Titan has given Cassini that last push - a goodbye kiss. Its fate is sealed. A toast to a great spacecraft, a great mission.feedback

Morgan Cable

As a scientist, I always try to be empirical. But you get attached to the things you work on.feedback

Linda Spilker

It's a mix of sadness of Cassini ending, saying goodbye to this Cassini family we talk about. We've been together, for lots of us, for multiple decades.feedback

Hillary Clinton

I don't know what it's like for other women, but growing up, I didn't think that much about my gender except when it was front and center. Like in 8th grade, when I wrote to NASA to say that I dreamt of becoming an astronaut, and someone there wrote back: Sorry, little girl, we don't accept women into the space program. Later in life, I started to see myself differently when I took on roles that felt deeply and powerful womanly: wife, daughter to aging parents, girlfriend, and most of all, mother and grandmother.feedback

Jonathan Lunine

All of these missions are connected, and they build on each other.feedback

Torrence Johnson

You had the analysis from the orbits, what the probabilities were, and what the scientific benefits of the things were. We thought, well, let's just go out in a blaze of glory.feedback

Linda Spilker

It's like in the death of a loved one–you look back and you think about all the good memories, the times you've shared together, went on vacation together, grandchildren. I think of it more like planning perhaps a wake.feedback

Linda Spilker

The legacy for which Cassini will be remembered will be Enceladus.feedback

Mar Vaqearo

The key is to calculate this change in velocity. So you use math. You have matrices. And you have partials. Those are changes in your trajectories with respect to each parameter. So you use your matrices, your vectors, position and velocity and your partials to come up with this delta V that you see here.feedback

Duane Roth

We need to be able to point instruments to objects. Nothing is static. Everything is moving. The timing is critical. We don't know exactly where Titan is at any given moment, or where Saturn is, or where Cassini is. When you want to propagate that out to some future time, all our errors grow.feedback

Linda Spilker

You form a family. Your kids grow up together.feedback

Brian Wilcox

The primary objective … is to gradually defang Yellowstone as a threat to humanity. Keeping these volcanoes from devastating the human food supply and causing the deaths of 99 percent of all of humanity, that seems like a worthwhile thing to debate.feedback

Jim Bridenstine

People often say, Why are you so involved in space issues? My constituents get killed in tornadoes. I care about space.feedback

Bill Nelson

[T]he head of NASA ought to be a space professional, not a politician.feedback

Brian Wilcox

Most people think of a supervolcano as this amazingly massive thing that is so huge compared to puny human engineering capabilities. It's not so much that the amount of heat represented is so vast beyond human experience. It's that it's stored for a very, very long period of time and then released all at once.feedback

Brian Wilcox

Even though it's unlikely to happen in anybody's given lifetime, it will eventually happen. One of these things is going to blow, and it's going to be devastating.feedback

Phillip Larson - SpaceX

Sometimes the biggest challenges aren't the rocket science, but the political side of getting pragmatic engineering approaches to space exploration. I'm bullish on this pick. The top line flags - politician and climate - are not as serious when you look under the hood. He wants NASA to have a strong Earth science mission. And he wants to push the agency forward, including commercial. In current environment, this is a win for the space community.feedback

Kelvin Droegemeier

He absolutely believes the planet is warming, that [carbon dioxide] is a greenhouse gas, and that it contributes to warming.feedback

Suzanne Dodd - Nasa

One day we'll be looking for the signal and we won't hear it anymore.feedback

Suzanne Dodd - Nasa

I've had people ask me, you mean the mission is still going on? They assumed that it had stopped after it passed Neptune.feedback

Jeff Berner

That we're able to get a signal and extract data from it, to me, is just an amazing thing. It just got to show how well the spacecraft was built and how good the equipment that we have in the DSN is.feedback

Suzanne Dodd - Nasa

These scientists have had their instruments on for 40 years. Nobody wants to be the first one turned off.feedback

Randy Bresnik - Nasa

We're in your debt for the supreme dedication that you simply guys should the human mission of exploration.feedback

Peggy Whitson

I love working up here. It's one of the most gratifying jobs I've ever had. But the thing I've been thinking about the most, kind of been fantasising about a little bit, are foods that I want to make, vegetables that I want to sauté, things that I've missed up here.feedback

Jim Bridenstine

Mr. Speaker, global temperatures stopped rising 10 years ago, Global temperature changes, when they exist, correlate with Sun output and ocean cycles.feedback

Marco Rubio

I just think it could be devastating for the space program. Obviously, being from Florida, I'm very sensitive to anything that slows up NASA and its mission. It's the one federal mission which has largely been free of politics and it's at a critical juncture in its history. I would hate to see an administrator held up -- on [grounds of] partisanship, political arguments, past votes, or statements made in the past -- because the agency can't afford it and it can't afford the controversy.feedback

Paul Chodas - Nasa

It's the closest that an asteroid this large has ever come to the Earth. So it's remarkable from that point of view. On the other hand, it's passing by at a safe distance, roughly 18 times the distance between the Earth and the moon. Space is littered with this stuff. And our job is to search for the ones that could be hazardous.feedback

Paul Chodas - Nasa

Florence isn't a hazard, but we are on the lookout for other ones that could pose a hazard to the Earth.feedback

Paul Chodas - Nasa

We know its orbit really well and we've projected into the future and we know that it can't approach much closer than this for at least a millennia. So it's safe to say that we are safe from a collision.feedback

Vishnu Reddy

This is a team effort that involves more than a dozen observatories, universities and labs across the globe so we can collectively learn the strengths and limitations of our near-Earth object observation capabilities. This effort will exercise the entire system, to include the initial and follow-up observations, precise orbit determination, and international communications.feedback

Sarah Kendrew - European Space Agency

I thought I knew about rain (I lived in Britain for a long time!), but nothing could have prepared me for what we are seeing here at the moment. Every time I think we're through the worst of the storm and it can't possibly rain any more, another wave hits us with relentless rain, and often violent thunder and lightning.feedback

Sarah Kendrew - European Space Agency

It's been challenging at times to concentrate on work whilst our phones are sounding emergency flood and tornado alerts several times an hour, and knowing that people just miles from our desks, maybe even family or friends, are in danger and possibly losing their homes.feedback

Royce Renfrew

This event will become yet another item of lore in the long history of flight operations for young flight controllers to learn from.feedback

Bill Jeffs - Nasa

All backup facility systems required to maintain the telescope have been checked and readied for use if necessary.feedback

David Pescovitz

It was absolutely sublime. The quality was like nothing we'd ever heard.feedback

David Pescovitz

It came to the point where I was calling Papua New Guinea at 2 o'clock in the morning, and working with amazing ethnomusicologists around the world to try to track down as much information as possible, to find out about who these people were, what the music was, who collected it and when.feedback

David Pescovitz

When you're seven years old and you hear that there's a group of people who are creating a phonograph record that's actually a message to extraterrestrials and attaching it to two space probes and launching it into the solar system and beyond–it sparks the imagination. That stuck with me.feedback

Bonnie Patten

Marketing products as having the ability to treat diseases and disorders not only violates established law but is a terribly deceptive marketing ploy that is being used by Goop to exploit women for its own financial gain. Goop needs to stop its misleading profits-over-people marketing immediately.feedback

Zoe Cormier

Don’t wait for astronauts to show us how to recycle bodily waste into useful products. Here’s how you can extract value from your own liquid assets now. Scientists in South Carolina have this week described how astronauts of the future could recycle their own urine, breath and other forms of waste into useful products, such as fuel, nutrients, clean drinking water, and even polymer plastics.feedback

Elon Musk - Tesla Motors

First picture of SpaceX spacesuit. More in days to follow. Worth noting that this actually works (not a mockup). Already tested to double vacuum pressure. Was incredibly hard to balance esthetics [sic] and function. Easy to do either separately.feedback

Andy Stein

This is just too perfect. Congratulations. You have won the entire internet.feedback

Ryan Detrick - LPL Financial

Are the stars aligned for a major equity correction due to the eclipse? Fortunately, when a total solar eclipse has been seen in the U.S. since 1900, equity prices are up 17.2 percent a year later. So it appears our biggest worry isn't what stocks might do, but whether those glasses we bought online are officially approved by NASA.feedback

Ryan Detrick - LPL Financial

Using data from NASA back to 1900 shows that it has been 26 years since the last total eclipse was visible in one of the 50 U.S. states, which more than doubled the previous longest streak of 11 years. Also, if you miss this one, you'll have to wait another six years for the next one.feedback

Julien Barbier

We have some students who have found jobs at NASA and Google. These are proof points of the result–of what you can achieve by going through this type of education.feedback

Angela Speck

It's no different than any other day. On a normal day your pets don't try to look at the sun and therefore don't damage their eyes, so on this day they're not going to do it either.feedback

Jen Winter

There is a lot of doubt in the water. Our product is quality – we sell to NASA, our filters are in space – but everyone is terrified and questioning absolutely everything. This will have an enormous financial impact, not just on us but our entire industry.feedback

Alex Young

While NASA isn't trying to be the eclipse safety glasses 'police,' it's our duty to inform the public about safe ways to view what should be a spectacular sky show for the entire continental United States. It's important that individuals take the responsibility to check they have the proper solar eclipse viewing glasses. With the eclipse a month away today, it's prudent to practice ahead of time.feedback

Garry Hunt

It's marvellous to think this archive is still here and still being used. Being involved so long ago – we started the mission 50 years ago – and this is still of interest … it's exciting. This was a starting point and this information will be used time and time again. Voyager was the first real mission that involved the pubic, kept the public informed, the involvement with the media was phenomenal and I'm very proud that happened. I'm pleased that other missions continue to do so.feedback

Carl Murray

I think about Voyager all the time because they were the pathfinders essentially. They taught us how to send multi-instrument spacecraft to the outer solar system.feedback

Garry Hunt

Yes, we saw the pictures on everything from chopstick boxes to posters on the underground.feedback

Carl Murray

In those days planetary exploration was something that Nasa did and the UK didn't really get involved in. But the fact that Garry was involved meant that other people could get involved. This has blossomed now if we think of missions like Rosetta and Cassini and the forthcoming Juice mission, all with massive UK involvement. It made us think that the UK does planets, Europe does planets – it's not just Nasa.feedback

Carl Murray

When I worked at Cornell, I realised that a lot of the images on the record were taken around upstate New York [near the university]: the local supermarket and all these places I knew. So I had this fantasy that sometime in the future when the aliens pick up the Voyager spacecraft, learn how to read the disc and come back looking for all these locations and one day the aliens will land in upstate New York.feedback

Garry Hunt

It is like holiday snaps but showing them to friends and saying well that's really interesting, I think I'll make my next holiday around that.feedback

Scott Mair - AT&T

We used NASA information to identify the places where the full eclipse would be the longest, and then used that information to look at cities that were planning events.feedback

Peter Iosifidis

When you look at traditional supersonic airplanes, they weren't designed for a low sonic boom. They were designed for speed, and some might argue, efficiency.feedback

Ronald Dantowitz

Enjoying totality by eye is more rewarding. There is much to see: stars during the daytime, the million-degree solar corona, and seeing the sun blacked out during the daytime.feedback

Jim Greene - Nasa

It's really quite an outstanding astrobiology and planetary protection experiment.feedback

Gavin Schmidt

People don't realize, but there's an enormous amount of data that has never been put into digital archives.feedback

Gavin Schmidt

I know people think the global temperature is just some number we go measure somewhere. It's not. The more information we have, the bigger the data set we have, the more confidence we can have in our findings.feedback

Ernie Wright - Nasa

There's a whole swath that's within a tenth of a second of the longest duration.feedback

Ernie Wright - Nasa

When it hits the edge of the Earth, it has to swoop around the whole curve, so it moves quite a bit faster.feedback

Joe McFarland

We can't possibly accommodate the thousands of people who'd like to stand here.feedback

Andrew Rush - Made in Space

This is an important milestone, because it means that we can now adaptively and on demand manufacture things in space. We have significantly de-risked that technology.feedback

Steve Jurczyk

We do believe that in-space robotic manufacturing and assembly is going to revolutionize the way we design and deploy and operate systems in space.feedback

Steve Jurczyk

That mission is just not doable right now, given the current launch vehicles and trying to fold things up and fit them in a launch vehicle shroud, in a single launch. It would take multiple launches of partially assembled systems, which would be expensive.feedback

Samuel Mukoma

NASA is not going to pay for our bills, I don't think it's a good move to tell people not to go to work actually ... we have been out of business for us for one week. I think they should tell people, to go back to work and wait for their next move.feedback

Robert Walker

We see Nasa in an exploration role, in deep space research. Earth-centric science is better placed at other agencies where it is their prime mission. My guess is that it would be difficult to stop all ongoing Nasa programs but future programs should definitely be placed with other agencies. I believe that climate research is necessary but it has been heavily politicized, which has undermined a lot of the work that researchers have been doing. Mr Trump's decisions will be based upon solid science, not politicized science.feedback

Glen Nagle

I'm going to be here for 24 hours and I won't be sleeping. We're going to be responsible for capturing Cassini's last breath of data. It'll be a bittersweet moment. Nasa can't do it without us because the other stations are completely facing in the wrong direction. Saturn will be in our skies, our field of view. It's literally the way the planets have aligned.feedback

Glen Nagle

When Nasa saw that, they flipped the switch to Australia and 600 million people around the world watched Neil come down the ladder, put his left foot on the surface of the moon and say, One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind. I was an eight-year-old kid sitting in front of the television, glued to the screen, watching humans walk on the moon in glorious black and white. I had no idea that 40 years later I'd be working at the place where I can look out of my window at the dish that brought me those pictures.feedback

Scott Edginton

We have to dispose of the spacecraft safely. So our navigators came up with this series of grand finale orbits, flying through the gap between the planet and the rings, and eventually ending in Saturn's atmosphere. When the scientists saw that plan they were like, Wow, this is unexplored territory, we're going to learn so many new things.' So starting April this year we entered into the grand finale orbits. It's hard to believe we're almost done.feedback

Glen Nagle

Right now Voyager 1 is roughly 20.7bn km away and moving further away by about 1.4million km every day. That's about four and a quarter times further away than Pluto. So it's way out there. It takes over 30 hours to get a signal there and back.feedback

Glen Nagle

You could throw a football field into it. Spacecraft receive and transmit data as digital ones and zeros. It's the same way that your phone receives a radio signal before your phone's software turns it back into a picture, it's just those ones and zeros. We don't know whether the stream we're receiving is a beautiful picture or some instrument data or some engineering data or whatever it is.feedback

Matthew Purdie

I like being part of history and science. I like the fact that I've been here for landings and launchings and things like that. Years ago they used to go around to each of the stations and ask for a 'Go? No go?', so you'd have to say, DSS45 is a go!' That was so cool, I loved doing that. They don't do that any more.feedback

Glen Nagle

Nasa can't do it without us because the other stations are completely facing in the wrong direction. Saturn will be in our skies, our field of view. It's literally the way the planets have aligned.feedback

Glen Nagle

They're literally too close for us. We just talk to the missions that have headed out across the solar system. Nasa's original intention was to use their dish in California to transmit the pictures to the world and show America winning the space race. When Neil came out of the spacecraft the first thing he needed to do was switch on a camera which was mounted upside down so that he could later pick it up with his big, gloved hand. Nasa were going to flip the picture but the video technician called in sick that day and his backup forgot.feedback

Glen Nagle

The dish out the front is the one from Honeysuckle Creek that received and relayed to the whole world the first pictures of Neil Armstrong walking on the moon in 1969.feedback

Greg Boyd

I love the science. When I first started I was into everything. We used to have these things called twixes, well before we had emails. They were advisories about what was happening and I'd be reading all this groovy stuff that's going on.feedback

Glen Nagle

I was an eight-year-old kid sitting in front of the television, glued to the screen, watching humans walk on the moon in glorious black and white. I had no idea that 40 years later I'd be working at the place where I can look out of my window at the dish that brought me those pictures.feedback

Glen Nagle

Cassini's going to end its life as a shooting star in the atmosphere of a giant ringed world. There's no more poetic way for a spacecraft to finish what has been a magnificent mission.feedback

Glen Nagle

At the present time we, Earth, have about 30 missions in the solar system, so about 40 individual spacecraft. We communicate with them using radio waves – the invisible part of the electromagnetic spectrum.feedback

Matthew Purdie

We refer to ourselves as coiled springs. We're sort of employed to handle things when they go wrong. Most of the time we're looking for green on our screens. If everything's green we're good; if it goes orange or red we're in trouble.feedback

Felix Oduor

This is just a warm-up. Tomorrow we will go to State House and they can kill us there.feedback

Sylvia Acevedo

When you're first selling and you're selling to family and friends, everyone says yes. I still hadn't met my goals so I realized I was going to have to talk to people I didn't know and introduce myself and introduce them to Girl Scouts.feedback

Sylvia Acevedo

They all loved me. I did that on my own dime but I wasn't going to take no because I knew I had the skill set.feedback

Sylvia Acevedo

When selling Girl Scout cookies, I would add up the numbers until I would get to that total and it made me feel really good at adding numbers. The Girl Scouts cookies program is more than just selling boxes of cookies. It really teaches you so much about setting goals objectives and how to have good business sense. Those are the kind of skills that stay with you your whole life.feedback

Sylvia Acevedo

When I got into Girl Scouts I really loved it. We were planning all the activities we were going to do. I thought, Sell cookies? If you are a kid who's living in poverty and living paycheck to paycheck, you don't know how to create opportunities. You set your goals, you set your determination, you got your drive and you just go and make it happen. It resonated with me because of what my troop leader had taught me: You can create your own opportunities, you can set your goals, you can break down what you need to accomplish ... and then just achieve them.feedback

Sylvia Acevedo

I just grabbed the presentation and I said, If you want this data and this information, it comes with me' and so they ended up having to hire me.feedback

James Orengo

These characters look like they are from heaven but they also have a past. Going to court is not an alternative, we have been there before. Every time an election has been stolen, the Kenyan people have stood up to make sure changes are made to make Kenya a better place. No force on earth can go against a people united. Therefore nobody should think this is the end of the matter and nobody should make us feel guilty that we have got constitutional alternatives in interrogating the decision that has been made by this commission that is a great tragedy.feedback

James Orengo

Every time an election has been stolen … Kenyans have stood up.feedback

Emma Gordon - Verisk Maplecroft

NASA's outright declaration that Odinga is the rightful winner raises the risk of further violence in opposition areas should the IEBC confirm Kenyatta's victory.feedback

Bill Cooke

When you go out tomorrow night, the meteors you will see will be the material that left that comet around the time of the Civil War or before.feedback

Bill Cooke

Observers this year could probably expect to see one about every couple of minutes.feedback

Bill Cooke

The Leonids have produced the ones that led people to think the world was going to end. Imagine going outside in 1833 and seeing tens of meteors per second.feedback

Florence Tan - Nasa

It's not just, Oh, I'm ready to send a command, just send an email to somebody.feedback

Florence Tan - Nasa

When I watch WALL-E, I definitely feel the same feeling that everybody feels, so I understand. When WALL-E was all alone ... I watched that movie and I shed a tear.feedback

Florence Tan - Nasa

In a nutshell, there is no scientific gain from the rover playing music or singing 'Happy Birthday' on Mars.feedback

Scott Berry

Pregnant women should smoke and drink liquor during the eclipse. This will prevent radioactive waves from making your ankles swell and being grouchy most of the time. Meanwhile, your other children will be on the school bus wondering why it got dark so early. An afternoon snack of potted meat will encourage them to ignore the end of the world as we know it.feedback

Scott Berry

It's the last day on Earth. You might as well go out with a bang, right? If you're going to die anyway, I mean, s‑‑‑, smoke and have a glass of wine. It'll be okay.feedback

Scott Berry

We have built an eclipse-proof bunker here, and when the dust settles and the zombies rise up, I will still be here.feedback

Scott Berry

I like to use the page for my little missives. I appreciate sarcasm as a form of communication, so I try to incorporate sarcasm at appropriate times.feedback

Scott Berry

Have you ever had a RaisinO? I mean, have you ever seen that sad cereal? Man, I'm telling you – in our grocery store here, it's about seven years old. Nobody has bought a bag of RaisinOs – nobody's going to eat CheeriBran or RaisinOs.feedback

Ralph Chou

Unfortunately, I think it is probably true that during every solar eclipse, there's bound to be somebody who does get hurt.feedback

Jack Davis

I may be 9 but I think I would be fit for the job. I am young so I can learn to think like an alien.feedback

Jim Green - Nasa

I hear you are a 'Guardian of the Galaxy' and that you're interested in being a NASA Planetary Protection Officer. That's great! It's about protecting Earth from tiny microbes when we bring back samples from the Moon, asteroids and Mars. It's also about protecting other planets and moons from our germs as we responsibly explore the Solar System.feedback

Jim Green - Nasa

It's about protecting Earth from tiny microbes when we bring back samples from the Moon, asteroids and Mars. It's also about protecting other planets and moons from our germs as we responsibly explore the Solar System. We are always looking for bright future scientists and engineers to help us, so I hope you will study hard and do well in school. We hope to see you here at NASA one of these days.feedback

Rick Fienberg

Going through life without ever experiencing totality, is like going through life without ever falling in love.feedback

Jim Green - Nasa

At NASA, we love to teach kids about space and inspire them to be the next generation of explorers. Think of it as a gravity assist -- a boost that may positively and forever change a person's course in life, and our footprint in the universe. It's about protecting Earth from tiny microbes when we bring back samples from the moon, asteroids and Mars. It's also about protecting other planets and moons from our germs as we responsibly explore the solar system.feedback

Jacqueline Faherty

This is the continuation of a cycle. You get lunar eclipses when you have full moons, and you have solar eclipses when you have new moons.feedback

Sylvia Acevedo

If I can cook, I can be an engineer. Girl Scouts gave me that early confidence of being competent to talk about money, talk about what I deserve and not taking no for an answer.feedback

Sylvia Acevedo

That's something that we really are focusing on, the U.S. needs to have a STEM-ready workforce. We are not just doing it for the girls, we're doing it for America.feedback

Sylvia Acevedo

I had an 'aha' moment when I was a young girl and my troop leader saw me looking at the stars. Later on, when we were choosing our badges, she encouraged me to get my science badge.feedback

Catharine Conley - Nasa

It's a moderate level. It's not extremely careful, but it's not extremely lax.feedback

Alexander MacDonald - Nasa

The Apollo program should not be seen as the classic model of American space exploration, but rather as an anomaly.feedback

Alexander MacDonald - Nasa

Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos are really following their own intrinsic motivations; they want their own futures in space. What's different from them to [philanthropist] Andrew Carnegie or [Smithsonian director] Charles Abbot? The best mechanism for achieving their motivations is a corporation. The Carnegie model was make all your money and donate it through a philanthropic foundation. These guys are still in their forties. They intend to be in the game of trying to advance our activity in space for the rest of their lives.feedback

Alexander MacDonald - Nasa

In the long historical perspective, the American movement out into space is much more than the story of 'one giant leap' by its government in service of geopolitical competition; it is a cumulative story of the many small steps of its people.feedback

Sarah Hörst

They're fundamental to life as we know it. They may be fundamental to life as we don't know it, if only because they're the most abundant elements in the universe.feedback

Sarah Hörst

I suspect that some people in the community will be like, great, another organic molecule in Titan's atmosphere–surprise, surprise. The thing that people really don't understand is that this chemistry is uniquely complicated. There really just aren't other places in the solar system where the atmosphere is doing chemistry that is this complex.feedback

Bill Pratt - Lockheed Martin

It is easy to take things for granted when you are living at home, but the recently selected astronauts will face unique challenges. Something as simple as calling your family is completely different when you are outside of low Earth orbit. While building this habitat, we have to operate in a different mindset that's more akin to long trips to Mars to ensure we keep them safe, healthy and productive. Making use of existing capabilities will be a guiding philosophy for Lockheed Martin to minimise development time and meet NASA's affordability goals.feedback

Rick Fienberg

We started collecting additional paperwork and what do you know–some don't have complete ISO paperwork. Some of them are in the process of trying to fix it and others have stopped talking to us. It's a moving target.feedback

Jason Lewin

[Counterfeiting] isn't new to Amazon but this isn't fidget spinners. These are supposed to be things to keep you safe.feedback

Jason Lewin

Hopefully what theyve done, putting a policy in place, will do something. Anything will help. It will all come down to the next couple of weeks.feedback

Andrew Lunt

All the testing I've done have shown that the products are very bright but are not unsafe. The IP is getting ripped off, but the good news is there are no long-term harmful effects. Just today I got a call for someone looking for 125,000 glasses. When we start running out and we will, people will buy anything.feedback

Andrew Lunt

In Germany, people were rioting in the street because the government mandated people without glasses had to stay indoors.feedback

Rick Fienberg

I'm going to list companies I know for sure are selling safe glasses and the way I know for sure is I've talked not just to them but the manufacturers that are supplying them. We know they have been tested and we've handled them ourselves.feedback

Rick Fienberg

Everything was going along fine until the public started to wake up to the eclipse and started buying things that may or may not be safe. Now they are peppering us and NASA with questions.feedback

Rick Fienberg

I have their samples. I have their ISO certification and it is deficient. It is not complete.feedback

Bill Pratt - Lockheed Martin

It's a steppingstone to the actual flight vehicle and pretty representative of the actual thing that flies.feedback

Peter Coen

That's going to make it possible for companies to offer competitive products in the future.feedback

Bill Pratt - Lockheed Martin

We are excited to work with NASA to repurpose a historic piece of flight hardware. While building this habitat, we have to operate in a different mindset that is more akin to long trips to Mars . Because the Deep Space Gateway would be uninhabited for several months at a time, it has to be rugged, reliable, and have the robotic capabilities to operate autonomously. Essentially it is a robotic spacecraft that is well-suited for humans when Orion is present.feedback

Peter Iosifidis

Now you're getting down to that level where, as far as approval from the general public, it would probably be something that's acceptable. That's where NASA said we've got to go change the rule, and this is the path to making that happen.feedback

Jack Fischer - Nasa

People have asked me what a 'burrito of awesomeness smothered in awesome sauce' is... Well folks, it looks like this… awesome sauce is green.feedback

Shuai Li

The growing evidence for water inside the moon suggest that water did somehow survive, or that it was brought in shortly after the impact by asteroids or comets before the moon had completely solidified. The exact origin of water in the lunar interior is still a big question.feedback

Shuai Li

Other studies have suggested the presence of water ice in shadowed regions at the lunar poles, but the pyroclastic deposits are at locations that may be easier to access. Anything that helps save future lunar explorers from having to bring lots of water from home is a big step forward, and our results suggest a new alternative. The exact origin of water in the lunar interior is still a big question.feedback

Cassandra Hatton - Sotheby's

What makes it so special is that it was on the first lunar landing, used by the first man on the moon to bring back the first samples. So you always have this fascination with the 'first' things. Also the fact that it's not normally something that would be in private hands.feedback

Cassandra Hatton - Sotheby's

We typically don't see such a full sales room, but people really came out. We had people come in bringing their kids who love space and want to be astronauts.feedback

Alex Young

We call them safe solar-viewing glasses. They've at least existed for most of the 21st century. You need them to safely observe an un-eclipsed or partially eclipsed sun directly.feedback

Alex Young

These things block out such a huge amount of light they're hundreds of thousands of times stronger than regular sunglasses. When you look outside you only see the sun.feedback

Alex Young

You definitely don't even want to wear them driving.feedback

Alex Young

Even when 99 percent of the sun is blocked out by the moon, the amount of light is still 10,000 times stronger than a full moon. So even when there's 1 percent of the sun still visible, it's still too bright. These are not sunglasses. I've certainly read some really bad bits of misinformation. You can't–I don't even know where this came from–but you can't use old film negative. That's just completely wrong. You don't even want to wear them walking around.feedback

Matt Barrie - Freelancer.com

The theory is that there will be a lot of people who have expertise in folding techniques or origami and [Nasa] want to find a very efficient way to pack a radiation shield. Nasa want something that is sufficiently packed and compact so that when you actually land on a planet you can expand it and it will provide maximum efficiency and protection from radiation.feedback

Helen O'Brien

Origami is fantastic – the way that the intricate structures can be produced in such a small volume, but then also can be deployed to something that is really huge. There is no reason why that kind of [approach] cannot be used to provide innovative and low mass shielding for space missions in the future.feedback

Helen O'Brien

Essentially cosmic rays and other solar radiation can be very damaging to both people and electronics.feedback

Matt Barrie - Freelancer.com

The whole premise is that by tapping into the minds of millions of people we will hopefully find unexpected solutions to problems that Nasa internally couldn't come up with.feedback

Kenneth Farley

So, the evidence is that Mars was different billions of years ago. Not thousands of years ago.feedback

Kenneth Farley

I would say that is extremely unlikely. Thank you for the good job you're doing. God bless.feedback

James Hansen

Some consequences [of climate change] are already becoming inevitable, but as yet it could be moderate if we begin to reduce emissions rapidly. So that's the objective – to try to get the global community to understand the importance of beginning those emissions reductions soon, and keeping the task that we're leaving for young people one that they can manage.feedback

Cristian Proistosescu

But that would be the wrong way to think about it. The more important point is that we cannot rule out the very real probability that there are slow feedbacks – and risk is probability times cost. … Once you start thinking in terms of risks I would concur with Dr. Hansen that the current trajectory presents some unacceptable risks.feedback

Andy Pitman

In my view, to limit warming to 2C requires both deep and rapid cuts and a climate sensitivity on the lower end of the current range. I see no evidence that the climate sensitivity is on the lower end of the current range, unfortunately. It would be a good idea to cut greenhouse gas emissions rather faster than we are.feedback

Andy Pitman

I do not think the recent anomalies change anything from a science perspective. The Earth is warming at about the long-term rates that were expected and predicted [by models].feedback

Andy Pitman

It would be a good idea to cut greenhouse gas emissions rather faster than we are.feedback

Dana Rohrabacher

I love science. I ask for permission for one minute for this question. You have indicated that Mars was totally different thousands of years ago. Is it possible that there was a civilization on Mars thousands of years ago? Billions, well. Yes.feedback

Bill Gerstenmaier - Nasa

I can't put a date on humans on Mars, and the reason really is…at the budget level we described, this roughly two per cent increase, we don't have the surface systems available for Mars. And that entry, descent, and landing is a huge challenge for us for Mars. If we find out there's water on the Moon, and we want to do more extensive operations on the Moon to go explore that, we have the ability with Deep Space Gateway to support an extensive Moon surface program. If we want to stay focused more toward Mars we can keep that.feedback

Tim Hughes - SpaceX

The principles applied in past programs for low Earth orbit capability can and should be applied to deep space exploration.feedback

Claudio Rosmino

Space missions like the Apollo missions are certainly an inspiration for future generations. During the era of the Apollo missions there was a big drive in science and technology, if you look the number of PhD students that graduated during that period in the US, but also here in Europe.feedback

Claudio Rosmino

We should go and explore the moon, to see if we can exploit the resources that are also available there, and to see if we can use it like a stepping stone to go further, eventually to realize our dream of having a man or a woman walking on Mars.feedback

Claudio Rosmino

My first memory from the Apollo mission is when the landing was actually occuring on the Moon. I was about 8 years' old at that time. I know that my parents got me out of bed in the middle of night to go and watch the landing, which was, of course, a very special event for me. Space missions like the Apollo missions are certainly an inspiration for future generations. During the era of the Apollo missions there was a big drive in science and technology, if you look the number of PhD students that graduated during that period in the US, but also here in Europe.feedback

Anna Hogg

At this point it would be premature to say that this was caused by global warming.feedback

Amy A. Simon

If you just look at reflected light from an extrasolar planet, you're not going to be able to tell what it's made of. Looking at as many possible different cases in our own solar system could enable us to then apply that knowledge to extrasolar planets.feedback

Jared Espley - Nasa

All of these instruments are working together to understand that and in particular we want to built up a network of observations to understand what is going on inside. Every time we come by with a close approach then we get a little bit more insight as to what is going on, but it will take many close approaches to built up this map of the interior.feedback

Jared Espley - Nasa

The main impression I have is the beauty of them. These are works of natural art.feedback

Jared Espley - Nasa

The other instruments are mostly focused on trying to understand what is happening underneath the clouds. That is actually really neat here because that will particularly allow us look and see what is underneath the great red spot.feedback

Jared Espley - Nasa

There's a lot of mysteries that are still about the storm – exactly what causes the red colour, exactly what is the energy that is powering the storm.feedback

Jay Lindell

You had this dense industry cluster started by defense spending that has continually grown and is fueled right now by major NASA programs.feedback

John Logsdon

The right thing to say is, nobody knows. The budget the Trump administration approved for NASA is basically a holding budget.feedback

David Hanson - Hanson Robotics

If you're going to space on an exploration mission and you can only bring one robot with you, would you bring a steel robot with a hard shell or would you bring a human-like robot? I think the answer is obvious.feedback

Rick Nybakken - Nasa

The success of science collection at Jupiter is a testament to the dedication, creativity and technical abilities of the Nasa-Juno team. Each new orbit brings us closer to the heart of Jupiter's radiation belt, but so far the spacecraft has weathered the storm of electrons surrounding Jupiter better than we could have ever imagined.feedback

Serkan Golge - Nasa

If I had not been arrested upon a flagrant slander on July 23, 2016, I at the moment would be continuing research in my office at Nasa as one of the few Turks among the thousands of scientists and engineers who are working in the manned trip to Mars project.feedback

Mahir Zeynalov

Beating up protesters in Washington, his position on the Qatar crisis, reluctance to work with Syrian Kurds in the fight against ISIS only pushed for his isolation in the world. Turkey is not an international pariah yet, but it sure is on its way to be.feedback

Serkan Golge - Nasa

I just want to scream and shout so loud about what is happening to him. He has such an intelligent mind that is wasting away in that cell.feedback

Serkan Golge - Nasa

If we were guilty we would have run back to America straight away, but we didn't. We couldn't ever have imagined something like this could happen. It all still feels like a sick joke.feedback

Omar de Frias

I grew up seeing my dad work 12- to 14-hour days and telling me that the result of your work is only as good as your efforts.feedback

Donald J. Trump

Here from this bridge to space, our nation will return to the moon, and we will put American boots on the face of Mars.feedback

Mike Pence

I'm really sorry that I missed the successful commercial launch that took place last night–I was praying for rain at the Kennedy Space Center so we might see that rocket go up today. I'm particularly excited to see the increased collaboration with our burgeoning commercial space industry so much in evidence here at the Kennedy Space Center.feedback

Barack Obama

We will get back to winning in the 21st century and beyond.feedback

Dave Richwine - Nasa

It should sound like a thump, so it could be that people don't even notice the sonic boom … and that's really the data that we are talking about for regulatory change.feedback

Dave Richwine - Nasa

Managing a project like this is all about moving from one milestone to the next. Our strong partnership with Lockheed Martin helped get us to this point. We're now one step closer to building an actual X-plane.feedback

Robert David Steele

Pedophilia does not stop with sodomizing children. It goes straight into terrorizing them to adrenalize their blood and then murdering them. It also includes murdering them so that they can have their bone marrow harvested as well as body parts.feedback

Robert David Steele

This may strike your listeners as way out, but we actually believe that there is a colony on Mars that is populated by children who were kidnapped and sent into space on a 20-year ride. So that once they get to Mars, they have no alternative but to be slaves on the Mars colony.feedback

Guy Webster - Nasa

There are no humans on Mars. There are active rovers on Mars. There was a rumour going around last week that there weren't. There are. But there are no humans. There's only one stupid rumour on the Internet? Now that's news.feedback

Aaron Parness - Nasa

There are many missions that would benefit from this [technology], like rendezvous and docking and orbital debris mitigation. We could also eventually develop a climbing robot assistant that could crawl around on the spacecraft, doing repairs, filming and checking for defects.feedback

Mark Cutkosky

What we've developed is a gripper that uses gecko-inspired adhesives. It's an outgrowth of work we started about 10 years ago on climbing robots that used adhesives inspired by how geckos stick to walls.feedback

David Davis

Half of my task is running a set of projects that make the NASA moon shot look quite simple. My job is to bring back control of migration to Westminster. It is not to slam the door on immigration. We will bring immigration down but in a way and at a pace that does not cause labor shortages or, worse, undermine the nation's need for new talent.feedback

Raymond Francis - Nasa

If you drive the rover into a new place, often that happens in the middle of the day, and then you've got several hours of daylight after that when you could make scientific measurements. But no one on Earth has seen the images, no one on Earth knows where the rover is yet. We can make measurements right after the drives and send them to Earth, so when the team comes in the next day, sometimes they already have geochemical measurements of the place the rover's in.feedback

Raymond Francis - Nasa

When I give talks about this, I say we have a rule that says, don't shoot the rover.feedback

Raymond Francis - Nasa

Micromanaging the speed of a car to the closest kilometer an hour is something that a computer does really well, but choosing where to drive, that's something you leave to the human.feedback

Raymond Francis - Nasa

In a factory, you can program a robot to move in a very exact way over to a place where it picks up a part and then moves again in a very exact way and places it onto a new car that's being built. You can be assured that it will work every time. But when you're in a space exploration context, literally every time AEGIS runs it's in a place no one has ever seen before. You don't always know what you're going to find.feedback

Raymond Francis - Nasa

I think there's some people who imagine that the reason we're doing this is so that we can give scientists a view of Mars, and so we shouldn't be letting computers make these decisions, that the wisdom of the human being is what matters here.feedback

Robert Lightfoot - Nasa

We need both, rovers and people. The rovers go there and they scout, they are our scouts. They tell us what we need to know when we take humans. And we think that taking humans is what we want to do from an exploration perspective, pushing human's presence into deep space is kind of written into our DNA.feedback

Robert Lightfoot - Nasa

We're pushing to get humans in the vicinity of Mars in the 2030s, that would be our goal going forward. We've got a lot of work to do on the technologies and the systems that we need to build. We'll do that with our partners – that's one of the things we're here to talk to them about, if they bring their skills and capabilities to bear in that journey. We'll spend some time around the Moon, checking out systems that we need to take to go to Mars, while we're still close to home, to make sure those systems are working well.feedback

Jan Worner

I can say that in the ESA environment this is not a request. In the ESA environment. We have also Switzerland and Norway as non EU members, so we know how to deal with it.feedback

Jan Worner

They are asking us frequently for risky missions. For instance to go to other planets, like ExoMars, or to go to a comet, these are missions which people very much like. They also say the inspiration you give makes us also able to dream about something in the future, and then space has suddenly more than just a financial issue, it has a societal issue, a societal benefit.feedback

Thomas Pesquet

The hard part is the return, really. When I was back on Earth, with the gravity, I couldn't do anything for a couple of hours. So obviously when you get to Mars you want to be able to respond to any emergencies, so you'll need to work out quite a bit during the trip. Psychologically you have to be prepared too, because you'll completely lose the view of the Earth. On the Space Station we still fly around the Earth, so you're not too far away from home. On a Mars mission it's going to be a completely different deal, so people need to be prepared for it also in their minds.feedback

Bob Smith

A sonic boom is effectively just a big pressure change. So if you can effectively smooth that pressure change out it becomes a weaker wave so it becomes a rumble instead of a bang.feedback

Bob Smith

So a pilot gets an understanding if they are getting into a region where the impingement of a sonic boom on a populated area was getting more critical or less critical. It gives them a visualisation of what of that sonic boom footprint effectively is.feedback

Chris Mason

I think our species has a duty to keep: which is to preserve life and prevent extinction not only of ourselves, but of other critters as well.feedback

Kris Lehnhardt

It could be that 38 percent on the ground is enough to maintain our bone, muscle, heart, and [balance] system, but we don't know because we've never been able to study it.feedback

Chris Mason

The technology works today. It's just a question of optimization. I worry the most about hubris. We really think we know what we're doing. But of course, we can be wrong.feedback

Eric Christian

The main two goals are to understand why the corona is hotter than the surface, and why the solar wind gets accelerated up to a million miles an hour. It will revolutionize our understanding of the sun. It's the first time we get to go where the action is.feedback

C. Alex Young - Nasa

Everyone who has an opportunity to see totality is going to get a glimpse at a part of the sun that in roughly a year from now we will actually touch.feedback