Northern Ireland

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Last quote about Northern Ireland

Les Allamby
This case has the opportunity to bring about a real change to the law on termination of pregnancy in Northern Ireland. The Commission began its legal challenge in 2015 as we want women and girls in Northern Ireland to have the choice of accessing a termination of pregnancy locally in circumstances of serious malformation of the foetus, rape or incest, without getting a criminal record or facing going to prison.feedback
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Oct 24 2017
Arlene Foster, James Brokenshire, Theresa May and Martin McGuinness, are the people who have been quoted the greatest number of times about Northern Ireland. You can find them on this page and an additional total of 185 people who have something to say about this topic. All the 455 quotes on this page are sorted by date and by name. You can also have access to the articles to get the context of the quotes. The most recent quote from Arlene Foster is: “The Prime Minister understands the needs of Northern Ireland and we of course welcome the fact that she has been very clear in relation to the fact that there cannot be a border down the Irish Sea. There has been some currency given to that recently, particularly from the European Union side. What has driven us in relation to our confidence and supply agreement is to give stability to the United Kingdom as a nation.”.
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All quotes about Northern Ireland

Angus MacNeil

The Government continues to envisage a trade deal with the US as the moment when so-called 'Global Britain' arrives on the world stage. The imposition by the US of punitive tariffs on Canadian aerospace company Bombardier could badly affect jobs in Northern Ireland. Now we know - if we ever doubted it - that the US will be a tough test for the UK's fledgling trade negotiations team.feedback

Alistair Carmichael

The DUP will not wear this review. Nor will many Tory backbenchers. The Government should stop wasting public funds and bow to the inevitable.feedback

Danielle Banks - The Weather Channel

Regardless of the status upon arrival in Northern Ireland, we are anticipating a blast of high winds, which could certainly result in power outages [and] downed trees, and we're anticipating quite a bit of travel disruption.feedback

Keir Starmer

No deal means the return of a hard border in Northern Ireland. No deal means no agreement on how we trade with Europe. No deal means EU nationals working in our schools and hospitals and the 1.2 million UK citizens living in the EU will continue to be unsure about their future. No deal means no deal on aviation, which quite literally means planes cannot take off and land. This is not scaremongering, it's the grim reality.feedback

Kate Maltby

The chancellor is being abused for exercising restraint on the public purse. But isn’t that what Conservatives are meant to do?The Tories are coming for the grey-haired men in suits. It’s not something we are used to seeing from the Conservative and Unionist parties of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, but we live in extraordinary times. This week, it is the turn of Philip Hammond to face the tumbrils. For the anti-Conservative crime of counting his pennies, the chancellor was described as “coming very close to sabotage” (by the former chancellor Lord Lawson), a colleague who deserves to be sacked (friends of Boris Johnson and Liam Fox) and a man who “ought to be tried for treason” (by rightwing commentator Julia Hartley-Brewer). Roll up, roll up, fresh heads on spikes for yer pleasure.feedback

Daniel Holder

To date ministers have sidestepped their equality duties in relation to the operation of this deal – that is troubling and challengeable, we would urge them to comply as a matter of urgency.feedback

Daniel Holder

The directing of resources to the benefit of one side of the community was a core grievance in Northern Ireland's Troubled past. To address this the equality duty was consequently a central safeguard in the Good Friday agreement. This new arrangement between the government and the DUP cannot be used as a vehicle to bypass the equality duty when earmarking funds, to do so would further roll back the agreement at a time when it is already under strain.feedback

Brendan Rodgers

Northern Ireland lost against Norway but you could clearly see good organisation and an identity in the team. They have created a spirit these last few years and that is what also makes the difference.feedback

Arlene Foster

But of course she very clearly understands that that would be a disaster for Northern Ireland and would be a red line for us in the Democratic Unionist Party.feedback

Arlene Foster

The Prime Minister understands the needs of Northern Ireland and we of course welcome the fact that she has been very clear in relation to the fact that there cannot be a border down the Irish Sea. There has been some currency given to that recently, particularly from the European Union side. What has driven us in relation to our confidence and supply agreement is to give stability to the United Kingdom as a nation.feedback

Gary Haggarty

I have now concluded that the evidence currently available is insufficient to provide a reasonable prospect of obtaining a conviction against 11 of the suspects reported by the PSNI and the two police officers reported by OPONI (Office of the Police Ombudsman for Northern Ireland). I have therefore taken a decision that a prosecution case against these individuals will not be taken forward.feedback

Stephen Farry

This is a very good illustration of a much deeper problem. Northern Ireland is not yet a peaceful society. We have ongoing coercive control by paramilitary structures at a local level across many communities.feedback

Lars Lagerback

I would never count out Northern Ireland. I think they have a fair chance of beating anyone.feedback

Martin O'Neill

We had a great time [with Northern Ireland] in 1982. I've told the players, this is it, this is it, so don't die wondering. You have to go for it. And we will go for it.feedback

Joachim Lang

After four rounds of negotiations, German industry looks with concern at the progress of the Brexit negotiations. The British Government is lacking a clear concept despite talking a lot. German companies with a presence in Britain and Northern Ireland must now make provisions for the serious case of a very hard exit. Anything else would be naive.feedback

Simon Coveney

He will be outlining to Secretary Ross the Irish government's concern as to the potentially serious implications of a negative ruling for the Bombardier workforce in Belfast and for wider economic stability in Northern Ireland which is an essential support to the peace process.feedback

Ruth Davidson

I think it needs to get over its current nervous breakdown and man up a little bit. I honestly can't see it. honestly can't. I am really lucky and am regularly behind the door at No10. But it honestly looks like the loneliest job in the world. It really does. I haven't kickboxed in years - but I am still a lesbian. I'm not sure that Arlene Foster would be comfortable with the idea of being in bed with me.feedback

James Brokenshire

We will leave the European Union in 2019 as one United Kingdom. That includes leaving the single market and the customs union, so that we can strike new trade deals with the rest of the world.feedback

James Brokenshire

I say to Boeing this case is unjustified and unwarranted. This action is not what is expected of a long-term partner to the UK. They need to get round the table and secure a negotiated outcome to this dispute quickly. The support that the UK provided to the Bombardier operation in Belfast was and remains compliant with international requirements.feedback

Eddie McFall

In Belfast, we are in a bad position. We have no local representation in Stormont. The DUP [Democratic Unionist party] are too busy propping up a failing government, which has still to get to grips with what Brexit really means. Then there's Trump being Trump.feedback

David Davis

I still know him as the 'hero of Dublin', when as prime minister of little Luxembourg in 1996 he calmed a row between the giants Kohl and Chirac over the Stability and Growth Pact [economic and monetary union policy]….Jean-Claude rammed Germany and France's heads together and made the arrival of the euro possible. In many areas, such as citizen rights and Northern Ireland, progress has indeed been made. Is it enough? That is a recommendation Michel will make to government leaders. He is keeping his cards close to his chest.feedback

Theresa May

We are very clear about the importance of Bombardier and the importance of those jobs in Northern Ireland. And we will be doing everything we can to ensure that we can see those jobs being guaranteed in the future.feedback

Craig Erlam

It's a big blow for Bombardier, it's a big blow for Canada, it's a big blow for Northern Ireland and therefore Theresa May. It's debatable again as to whether this is going to eventually get agreed upon of course. It's still got to go through one more stage. It's a huge tariff so they're going to need substantial evidence that suggests that these planes were sold for significantly subsidised prices.feedback

Alan Tovey

The Prime Minister herself spoke to President Trump when she was recently in America about this very issue because everyone realises how important Bombardier is to Northern Ireland, and we will use our influence with the Government to make sure that that continues.feedback

Theresa May

This result underscores what we have been saying for months: the US trade laws were never intended to be used in this manner, and Boeing is seeking to use a skewed process to stifle competition and prevent US airlines and their passengers from benefiting from the C-Series.feedback

Arlene Foster

This is a very disappointing determination, but it is not the end of the process and there are further steps that will follow.feedback

Simon Tilford

Outside the EU’s protective umbrella, Brexit Britain would be at the mercy of strong-arm US trade tactics. The EU and the US have been squabbling about support for their respective aircraft makers, Boeing and Airbus, for decades. Despite this, the US has never resorted to such heavy-handed tactics with Airbus and the EU as it now has with Canada’s Bombardier, placing thousands of jobs at the firm’s Northern Ireland factory in doubt. And for good reason: the US would have too much to lose from such action. The EU is a big market with a powerful trade authority, and US producers are too dependent on the EU market for the US to risk retaliation. This case gives us a real taste of how the UK will be treated in negotiations over a US-UK trade deal post-Brexit, and how vulnerable the country will be.feedback

Jeffrey Donaldson

It is critical for Belfast. This would have devastating consequences on our economy if the factory were to close and we're going to do everything we can to ensure that doesn't happen.feedback

Emmanuel Macron

Before we move forward, we wish to clarify the issue of the regulation of European citizens, the financial terms of the exit and the question of Ireland. If those three points are not clarified, then we cannot move forward on the rest. How can we put money on the table when we don't know what the deal is? How can we discuss how the finer details of the Northern Ireland border should operate when the EU won't even begin to discuss what the relationship is that they want between the UK and the EU?feedback

Maria Demertzis - Bruegel

I'm reassured that a deal on the citizens rights will be achieved and rather quickly, there's good things about it on both sides of the Channel, I think that will be reached. Northern Ireland comes into this, again I'm convinced that a good and satisfactory solution will be reached. And the other thing is that I have no doubt in my mind the UK will honour its agreements.feedback

Guy Verhofstadt

Some British politicians – not to name Boris Johnson – criticise their countrymen and women for wanting to keep their European identity. He accuses them of 'split allegiance'. I think this is a binary, old-fashioned and reductionist understanding of identity. I think we need to be smarter, more open and more inventive then that. It is this position that needs to be defended by our European Union just as the European Union needs to [make sure] there is no return to the past, to hard borders on our continent, and certainly not to a hard border between Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic.feedback

Diane Dodds

We will not countenance a solution that makes us different from other parts of the United Kingdom. He's very clear in dismissing the papers which the British government have produced to date and so I did find him a very understanding man and we need to take these opportunities to engage with him. I believe he's someone who has been very aware of the implications of Brexit on the island of Ireland and someone who has been very strong in setting out his position on issues which need to be resolved before moving on to the next stage of negotiations.feedback

Diane Dodds

We've made very clear to him today the issues which we need to see: we need to remain in the customs union, we need to have access to the single market, we need to see no return to hard borders and to see citizens have access to the European court of justice.feedback

Gina Miller

First article 50, now the DUP ‘bung’: without proper scrutiny, the Tory government is behaving as if it is above the law. If there is one thing in short supply in parliament these days, it is people who fret about detail. Margaret Thatcher read every paper in her red box. Robin Cook, too, got the importance of detail, and was almost certainly the only one who was really on top of what his government was doing in Iraq. The same might be said about Tam Dalyell, who was all over the Falklands conflict.feedback

Ray Boulger

The people most at risk will be those in parts of the country where property values have done badly. In London and the South East the chances are you will have seen quite a big gain, but in parts of the North and Northern Ireland prices have remained very low. This won't help.feedback

Claire Bassett

We welcome the minister's announcement today as a positive first step towards implementing our 2014 recommendation that an accessible, proportionate voter identification scheme should be introduced in Great Britain. Voters in Northern Ireland have been required to show photographic proof of identity since 2003, and we have the opportunity to learn from that experience. The Electoral Commission is responsible for carrying out an independent, statutory evaluation of the pilot schemes and we will publish our findings following the May elections, in the summer of 2018.feedback

Ian Paisley

My client totally denies the defamatory inferences arising from the article in today's Daily Telegraph including those relating to his registration obligations as an MP. He has now referred this matter, and a full explanation, to the Parliamentary Commissioner for Standards.feedback

Kathryn Hudson

They shall always be open and frank in drawing attention to any relevant interest in any proceeding of the House or its Committees, and in any communications with Ministers, Members, public officials or public office holders.feedback

Gavin Robinson

The engagement at governmental level with Boeing and with the U.S. has been significant over the course of the summer because this is pivotal to the Northern Ireland economy. We're not there yet, and the work still has to continue.feedback

Gina Miller

It beggars belief that, neither at the time the Government sealed its dubious deal with the DUP in exchange for their votes in the Commons, nor at any point since, has the Government made it clear that the £1 billion of taxpayers' money for Northern Ireland could only be handed over following Parliamentary approval. We all need to know when the Government intended to come clean to Parliament, its parliamentary party, and the public.feedback

Jeffrey Donaldson

We have raised the issue at ministerial level. We would be keen that she does intervene because its 5,000 jobs in Belfast which are at risk. We are aware that she was involved at looking at the issue. And we would welcome it if she was talking to President Trump because Bombardier is a huge investor in Northern Ireland. We are very concerned at the current situation. Any intervention by her would be extremely welcome.feedback

Michel Barnier

What I see in the UK's paper on Ireland and Northern Ireland worries me. The UK wants the EU to suspend the application of its laws, its customs union and its single market at what will be a new external border for the EU, and the UK wants to use Ireland as a kind of test case for the future EU-UK customs relations. This will not happen.feedback

Simon Blackburn

With mandatory hygiene rating display already in force in Wales and Northern Ireland, the UK leaving the EU provides a crucial opportunity to toughen up food safety laws by extending the legislation to England as well. Food hygiene standards and compliance levels have risen since the scheme was introduced in Wales.feedback

James Brokenshire

In the continuing absence of devolution, the UK government retains ultimate responsibility for good governance and political stability in Northern Ireland as part of the United Kingdom and we will not shirk from the necessary measures to deliver that. At the same time, we will need to consider carefully a range of other issues reflecting public concern, including whether it can continue to be justified to pay Assembly members who have not met for several months now. If things don't change we are on a glide path to greater and greater UK government intervention. But we can still change course.feedback

Ian Paisley

I can categorically state that I have never brokered any oil deal for this gentleman or anyone else. My client totally denies the defamatory inferences arising from the article in today's Daily Telegraph including those relating to his registration obligations as an MP. He has now referred this matter, and a full explanation, to the Parliamentary Commissioner for Standards.feedback

Michelle O'Neill

We need to see the implementation of outstanding agreements and an end to the denial of rights enjoyed by citizens everywhere else on these islands on language, marriage and access to coroner's courts. Establishing an Executive that may collapse after a matter of months on the same issues will only fail all our people. Let's agree to quickly conclude talks on implementation and rights, that is the only way to build a sustainable Executive that will last.feedback

Gerry Adams - Sinn Fein

The British government and unionist parties have failed to fulfil their commitment to an acht na Gaeilge (Irish language act) and to the full implementation of the Good Friday and St Andrews agreements. Implementation of these matters must be a bedrock of any future executive. Equality must be a bedrock for any future executive. The rights of Irish speakers must be recognised and respected.feedback

Aidan McGivern

This August bank holiday the weather may just redeem itself, particularly across England and Wales where we will have plenty of warm and dry weather. Showers will be further north, and actually the weekend will be book-ended by rain on Monday across Scotland and Northern Ireland.feedback

Oli Claydon

It's not particularly unusual to see these heavy bursts. The ones which went through Leeds and Northern Ireland overnight were particularly heavy, but it's common for our summer rainfall to fall in a few heavy bursts rather than frontal rain that can last for a few days in the winter.feedback

Martin Bowles

Anywhere in the east, including London, won't see anything because it will just be clouded over; also Scotland and Northern Ireland.feedback

David Davis

It is simply not possible to reach a near-final agreement on the border issue until we've begun to talk about how our broader future customs arrangement will work. Furthermore, if we get the comprehensive free trade agreement we're seeking as part of our future partnership, solutions in Northern Ireland are easier to deliver. There is real value in discussing a few issues upfront. Doing so should allow us to give businesses and citizens the certainty they need.feedback

Peter Hain

This government's dogmatic insistence on taking Britain out of the jurisdiction of the European court of justice could put vital funding for Northern Ireland at risk. Ministers themselves say the UK should remain part of the PEACE programme. But they have not faced up to the reality that this cannot be squared with their policy of leaving the jurisdiction of the ECJ. The government needs to bow to reality and accept that this programme will require the softening of their unnecessary red line on judicial sovereignty.feedback

Shannon Sickles

This is a long term, many years ahead appeal process to bring human rights to all citizens in Northern Ireland.feedback

Alan Smithers

Boys have done better this year, mainly because there has been a switch to exams at the end of the courses in England in thirteen of the major subjects. When A-levels changed to continuous assessment in 2002 the girls leapt ahead, but now we are reverting to exams boys have overtaken them again at A*-A. In Northern Ireland where the exams have stayed the same, girls have gone even further ahead.feedback

Theresa May

We will absolutely work for all sides in Northern Ireland, we are absolutely committed to the Belfast Agreement and to ensuring that the decisions we take are decisions for every community across Northern Ireland. As we look forward to Brexit, of course, we do want to ensure that we don't see a return to the borders of the past, we don't see a return to a hard border, and that we are able to ensure that the crucial flow of goods and people between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland is able to continue in the future.feedback

James Brokenshire

This isn't just some sort of unilateral, one-way issue that I'm talking about here. When you look at the trade that the U.K. has with Ireland it's around £13.6 billion ($17.5 billion). But equally the trade from Ireland to the U.K. is around £9.1 billion. It is that flow of trade that we see in both directions which is why this matters for both of us.feedback

David Davis

The UK and Ireland have been clear all along that we need to prioritise protecting the Belfast Agreement in these negotiations, and ensure the land border is as seamless as possible for people and businesses, . The proposals we outline in this paper do exactly that, and we're looking forward to seeing the EU's position paper on the Northern Ireland border.feedback

Theresa May

We want the EU funding that has helped victims of the Troubles and cross-community groups to continue at least until the current programme finishes. We then want to go further, and explore a potential future programme of peace funding after we leave the EU. There may be specific and valuable EU programmes for which we want to agree the continuation of funding. Peace funding in Northern Ireland is one of them.feedback

Theresa May

... But I have always said that as part of the deep and special partnership I want to negotiate between the UK and the EU, there may be specific and valuable EU programmes for which we want to agree the continuation of funding – peace funding in Northern Ireland is one of them. No one voted to end the special ties between the UK and Ireland or to undermine the unique arrangements between Ireland and Northern Ireland which have underpinned the peace process and have been in place well before our membership of the EU.feedback

James Brokenshire

This isn't just some sort of unilateral, one-way issue that I'm talking about here. When you look at the trade that the UK has with Ireland, around £13.6bn, but equally the trade from Ireland to the UK, around £9.1bn. It is that flow of trade that we do see in both directions, which is why this matters for both of us. It is not international trade at all. It is actually about business operating in local markets, which is why we think there is a strong, compelling case to see that exemption.feedback

Steve Aiken

I would caution the Republic of Ireland and nationalist parties against endlessly rubbishing whatever comes forward from the UK government. This should be about securing the best set of outcomes for the people of Northern Ireland, not trying to teach the UK government a lesson. The continued heckling gives rise to the perception that their focus is on the latter.feedback

Owen Smith

The government say they want trade across the Irish border to be frictionless and seamless, but actually they look clueless as to how they're going to achieve that. Producing this paper in the absence of a Northern Ireland executive with no substantive consultation with any of the Northern Ireland parties further damages the ability of the British government to resolve the impasse in Northern Ireland.feedback

Conor McGinn

These proposals on a light touch border are lighter still on detail. They don't outline how a frictionless or seamless border can be achieved when the UK leaves the EU and won't reassure anybody about the impact of Brexit on Northern Ireland.feedback

Alan Smithers

The 13 reformed A-levels are likely to narrow the gender gap, given by how much it shot up in 2002 when they went modular. Whether grades overall fall will depend on the extent to which Ofqual intervenes to protect consistency. The impact of the changes will be dampened in any case, since they only affect 13 of the 36 subject categories, and the exams are unchanged in Wales and Northern Ireland from which about 8.5% of the entrants come.feedback

Rowley Irlam

This year out in Spain we had 65 stunt performers, which is a massive call. Troy in its biggest scope had 45. We had 65 in Spain and 45 in Northern Ireland, so we had 110 stunt performers in two countries. That represents approaching half of the stunt performers in the UK available to everybody. We had 15 different countries represented in Spain as well.feedback

Gerry Carroll

We have enough divisions in Northern Ireland without these fascists getting a foothold here in this society. They are only here to ramp up these divisions even further.feedback

Leo Varadkar

Who will speak for Northern Ireland and her 1.8 million people? Time is running out, and I fear there will be no extra time allowed. We need to hear the voice of those elected representatives here in the north. We need the Executive, the Assembly, the North South Ministerial Council and the British Irish Council up and running and acting in the interests of our peoples. At a time when Brexit threatens to drive a wedge between north and south we need to build more bridges and fewer borders.feedback

Richard Whittam

Across 14 of the locations involved in the investigation, Mr Maxwell had in his possession, or had constructed, 14 pipe bombs. Of those 14 pipe bombs constructed by Mr Maxwell, four have been deployed in Northern Ireland.feedback

Simon Coveney

What we do not want to pretend is that we can solve the problems of the border on the island of Ireland through technical solutions like cameras and pre-registration and so on. That is not going to work. Any barrier or border on the island of Ireland in my view risks undermining a very hard-won peace process and all of the parties in Northern Ireland, whether they are unionist or nationalist, recognize that we want to keep the free movement of people and goods and services and livelihoods.feedback

Ian Paisley

1 of 2 things will now happen 1. A very hard border 2. Ireland will wise up and leave the EU.feedback

Richard Whittam

Mr Maxwell repeatedly accepted that the devices would be used by others for terrorist purposes. For example, he agreed with the statement that the items were made for the Continuity IRA (CIRA) with the intention of attacking police and police stations. It is our case that some of the items inevitably must have been taken from the UK to Northern Ireland by this defendant and it may be that, when travelling between England and the UK, bearing in mind the identity cards he would have had and his position, his passage would have been easier than others to take items with him.feedback

Boris Johnson

Let's be clear, the election did not evolve entirely in the way the Government had hoped or would have wanted ... I'm going to put that out. But the Labour Party did not win, they were 50 seats behind. We have a workable system of getting stuff through the House of Commons ... we have a workable majority with our friends from Northern Ireland. It wasn't that people were hostile to immigrants, they weren't hostile to people with talents and energy coming to the UK, they just wanted to feel that the British government had a handle on it.feedback

Owen Smith

There is no way the Tories should be able to get away with introducing these controversial changes without parliament debating and voting on them, especially in the absence of devolved government in Northern Ireland.feedback

Jon Greer - Old Mutual

The Conservatives had planned to end the triple lock, but conceded it in their negotiations with the DUP. So on the one hand they are maintaining state pension increases for today's retirees, while at the same time telling people age 47 and under that they will have to work longer before receiving their state pension.feedback

Gordon Brown

In the recent Northern Ireland Inquiry, compensation has also been recommended. At a minimum, we should match Northern Ireland in what would be a £40 million fund for national redress.feedback

David Davis

Overall, I am encouraged by the progress we have made on understanding each other's position on citizens' rights; the financial settlement; the first meetings of sub-groups on separation issues, and on the issues around Ireland and Northern Ireland. We are both going for a good deal.feedback

Theresa May

I want all British citizens to enjoy the fullest freedoms and protections. That includes equal marriage – because marriage should be for everyone, regardless of their sexuality. And while that is a matter for the devolved government of Northern Ireland, I will continue to make my position clear – that LGBT+ people in Northern Ireland should have the same rights as people across the rest of the UK. We don't agree with them on their approach to same-sex marriage, and I'm very clear that the Conservative Party in government doesn't agree with the DUP on those issues on LGBT rights.feedback

Mark Drakeford

The arrangements offered to Northern Ireland have direct read across to areas of devolved responsibility. For this reason, the benefits of the additional spending should be mirrored across all parts of the UK. For all its faults, the Barnett formula is supposed to be clear and rules-based. It is simply inexcusable that the UK government is willing to 'bypass' those rules.feedback

Derek Mackay

Despite this, the UK government argues that there should be no Barnett consequentials from this deal and refuses to acknowledge that Scotland, Wales and England will be short-changed by billions of pounds. That cannot be right – and the deal goes against the principles of the UK Treasury's own statement of funding policy.feedback

David Mundell

I certainly won't support funding which is deliberately sought to subvert the Barnett rules. We have clear rules about funding of different parts of the United Kingdom. If the funding falls within Barnett consequentials, it should come to Scotland.feedback

Mark Drakeford

That is why we have begun the formal dispute resolution with the government so that Wales is treated fairly alongside all nations of the UK.feedback

Theresa May

I can completely understand why people who are concerned about some of the attitudes that the DUP … some of the policies that the DUP promote, why they are concerned about this. Some people will be grateful I'm going to the Alps and not to Wales.feedback

Jeremy Corbyn

So, I say to her today, Labour will help you keep your promise. Bring forward a Bill to update the Act and improve trans rights and Labour will back you. You can give your MPs and the DUP a free vote and Labour will make it law.feedback

Sinead Grace

Game of Thrones (GoT) has been transformative for Northern Ireland as a screen tourism destination, with 25 accessible locations, mostly in County Antrim and County Down.feedback

Gina Miller

We will be making the argument that the correct constitutional process of parliamentary scrutiny and approval - as well as consultation with the devolved administration in Scotland and Northern Ireland and the Welsh Assembly - needs to be followed. Otherwise the notice to withdraw from the European Union would be unlawful and subject to legal challenge.feedback

Arlene Foster

She "would not want abortion to be as freely available here as it is in England.feedback

Austen Morgan

The challenge could be to a Northern Ireland department (culture) or the secretary of state, to prevent them acceding to Sinn Féin's demand when the DUP offer is on the table. An applicant could seek a declaration that it was contrary to the Belfast agreement.feedback

Sammy Wilson

The only [ones] who will make anything out of this will be the lawyers of the person who is running it. Fools and their money are easily parted. The amount that has been raised shows you that there are still quite a few fools about. I would imagine in six to eight months' time some lawyers will be going on their holidays on the basis of money which has been donated by people with more money than sense. And we'll still have the pact and we'll still have the billion pounds to fund public services in Northern Ireland.feedback

Austen Morgan

An Irish language act would not be per se contrary to [the paragraph]. However, in the Sinn Féin/DUP context, where the latter offered a culture act, it would appear that the advancement of Irish was contrary to other languages. [The paragraph] binds 'all participants' in the talks. That included Sinn Féin. However, while Sinn Féin could argue that it never signed up to the Belfast agreement, it has sought to give that impression, so would never argue that it was not bound.feedback

Hannah Peaker

Jess Phillips’s idea holds great promise, but we in the Women’s Equality party know it will be more effective with support from across the spectrum. British democracy is designed to protect the status quo. Never has this been more clear. Just a month ago, the public expressed utter contempt for old politics by retreating to older politics in the general election. In England, we were told the only viable choices were blue or red. In Northern Ireland, frustration over the suspension of Stormont resulted in victory for the very parties obstructing power-sharing. And in Scotland, the Tory resurgence rendered a second referendum impossible. The first-past-the-post system, supported by old parties and the media, did what it does best: it returned power to those that already have it.feedback

Joanna Sidhu

CrowdJustice has seen a flood of donations supporting this potentially game-changing legal challenge since the campaign went live this morning, showing how powerful a community can be when given the opportunity to come together. Having campaigned for peace in Northern Ireland for most of his life, Ciaran McClean is bringing this legal challenge to hold the government to account. By launching a crowdfunding campaign to support this challenge, Ciaran is giving everyone the opportunity to be part of the fight to preserve our democratic values.feedback

Ciaran McClean

I have spent most of my life campaigning for peace in Northern Ireland. The deal concluded between the government and the DUP threatens everything we've worked so hard for and I'm bringing this case to ensure the government is held to account. My claim is that as a citizen I expect my Government to honour its obligations under the Good Friday Agreement and not to bribe others with money so that it can stay in power.feedback

Ciaran McClean

The £1bn bribe actually threatens the institutions in Northern Ireland. How can there be impartiality when one of the executive parties has the UK government over a barrel? This case is not being taken for nostalgia value. The DUP deal threatens to undermine our democracy in Northern Ireland, so it is important that citizens can challenge it.feedback

Ian Paisley

My party will take a stand on that issue irrespective of the political agreements that are reached. I say that as a warning to others who may seek to raise the issue in the House in the weeks, months and, hopefully, years ahead.feedback

Michelle O'Neill

It's a consequence, as we all know, of the DUP supporting the prime minister (Theresa May) and, in turn, the prime minister supporting the DUP. It should be very clear now – and I've said it repeatedly and we've been consistent in saying 'we want to see these institutions restored'. But we need the executive to work on a sustainable basis.feedback

Arlene Foster

We are going to continue talking throughout the summer, I want to send that message very firmly to the people we represent. I think what we want to see is an agreement that everyone can buy into, whether you're a nationalist or a unionist. I hope others involved in this process are looking at the bigger picture as well and are saying if we want devolution, then you need to find an accommodation that everyone can feel comfortable with.feedback

James Brokenshire

This hiatus cannot continue for much longer. There is no doubt that the best outcome is for a new Executive to make those strategic decisions in the interest of all parts of the community in Northern Ireland. If we don't see resolution, it will become urgent. We have not reached that critical point yet, but that point is coming and the lack of a formal budget is not something that can be sustained indefinitely.feedback

Roy McGivern

We have made great strides forward. We have a young and enthusiastic band of supporters who now sing traditional Linfield songs and we encourage that greatly. We have players throughout the club, from the academy to the first team, who come from both sides of the community. That's something we're keen to promote, that Linfield represents all traditions of Northern Ireland and we want the very best players playing for our club and we want people from all sections of the community to support us.feedback

Conor Murphy - Sinn Fein

We don't see any urgency in terms of the DUP approach to this and we don't expect and don't think it is likely that there will be a deal in the short term because there is that lack of urgency. We are in the bizarre situation, I'm sure it's unique to here, that over the summer time we have to break because the atmosphere becomes too hostile for political negotiations. Now we find ourselves up against the 12th of July where the atmosphere becomes so hostile that the DUP are even less likely to move on some of these issues.feedback

Gerry Adams - Sinn Fein

I don't believe that there is going to be a deal by Monday. The DUP are showing no urgency or no real inclination to deal with the rights-based issues which are at the crux and the heart of these difficulties which we are talking here about.feedback

Arlene Foster

I have a great deal of respect for those people who love the Irish language, who want to use it every day in their lives.feedback

Gerry Adams - Sinn Fein

Unless they step-change I just cannot see, here we are on Saturday afternoon, I just cannot see how, and we told them this directly, how a deal can be put together by then. If there is a step change, part of that step change is for everybody to understand that equality and respect has to be at the heart of the institutions. They have to deliver for everybody, not just the Sinn Fein vote, not just the DUP vote, but for everybody including those people who don't vote, those people who are vulnerable, who are in poverty, who want their rights.feedback

Gerry Adams - Sinn Fein

I think it is very unlikely that there will be an agreement by Monday. The DUP are showing no urgency about dealing with the equality and rights issues, which caused the collapse of the political institutions. There is little prospect that they will do this before Monday.feedback

Billy Hutchinson

Yet the difficulty for unionists here in Northern Ireland is that any government in London, even a Tory one, acts as honest broker between unionism and nationalism, whereas all Irish governments act as guarantors for nationalists. So Dublin needs to remember that unionists still feel they are on their own.feedback

John O'Dowd

When you have a rights-based society for everybody, people's rights, whether you're from the Orange tradition or any other tradition, [are] protected in law.feedback

Michael Gove

If we have to fund higher education, and if people who get university degrees go on to earn well, they should pay something back, which is what the current system does. It's wrong if people who don't go to university find that they have to pay more in taxation to support those who do. The reason why we are investing in Northern Ireland – and it's not just DUP voters, it's all the people in Northern Ireland who are getting this additional investment – is that there are some unique problems that flow from the Northern Ireland Troubles.feedback

Gerry Adams - Sinn Fein

There is little prospect that they [the DUP] will do this before Monday. There is no agreement on Acht na Gaeilge (Irish Language Act), the bill of rights, marriage equality, respect, anti-sectarian measures or legacy issues. Equality, rights and respect are the only basis for sustainable institutions.feedback

Vince Cable - Stansted Airport

It's a scandal that this is shrouded in secrecy. We must know who the donors are and the fact that the DUP have such a prominent role in British public life means that these obscure transactions can no longer be hidden in Northern Ireland.feedback

Richard Cook

People come to us with projects [and] they tell us how it is promoting the Union. The executive committee assess that and will decide.feedback

Matthew Oakeshott

It's an outrage – the DUP pick the British PM but make donations in dark glasses through a loophole in our election law.feedback

Nuala McAllister

Belfast city council has already passed a motion before in favour of marriage equality and I do hope we see it in this city and across Northern Ireland very soon. This is the first rally I have attended as first citizen of Belfast and it's a great start to show leadership on this issue. And this is Finn's first rally too and he loves all the colours.feedback

Jeffrey Donaldson

The reason this matter is not explicitly mentioned in the Agreement between the DUP and the Government is because we have not yet reached an agreed position or established legal basis for accessing Libyan assets, given that these are the subject of international sanctions and covered by international law.feedback

Matthew Jury - Mccue & Partners

The DUP has assured us that the issue of compensation for the variety of victims of Libyan sponsored IRA terrorism throughout the UK is very much on the agenda for the Government/DUP Coordination Committee, and that discussions on how to achieve a resolution with Libya will now be taken forward at a ministerial level. This is a promising development which we hope will mean that, after decades of being ignored by successive governments, justice may finally be done.feedback

Jeffrey Donaldson

We have secured a commitment from the Government to convene a further meeting involving the relevant Minister(s) to discuss how we might take the matter forward, including on the issue of frozen Libyan assets in the UK. We are establishing a Coordination Committee between our two parties that will enable this type of issue to be addressed at Ministerial level. We remain committed to supporting the wider campaign by innocent victims to secure recompense and reparation from Libya and will seek to use our influence to secure a positive outcome.feedback

Liam Fox

What of course we, erm, it's the MPs from the DUP clearly wanted to get better funding for Northern Ireland on things like infrastructure, and who can blame them? They have influence that they didn't have before and that's what our political system throws up.feedback

Liam Fox

There was something that was different about Northern Ireland. If you look at the city deals that were done in England, there were over £3.2 billion pounds worth of city deals done.feedback

Liam Fox

The money will have to come from the treasury, the money will have to come from the existing programmes that we have. The government after the election had no overall majority, we had a duty to form a government, that's our duty and it's part of our constitution. The DUP share a lot of the common elements with the Conservative party.feedback

Liam Fox

In Scotland, there were three-quarters of a billion pounds worth of city deals done. In Wales, there were half a billion pounds. In Northern Ireland, zero.feedback

John O'Dowd

We will stay here as long as there is a glimmer of hope that there will be success in these talks, but we are realists and we are experienced negotiators and we know there needs to be a step change in these talks – hence the reason we are calling on the Taoiseach and the British Prime Minister to become directly involved.feedback

Sammy Wilson

The only risk to the peace process is the kind of hysteria which Sinn Fein are trying to generate for the moment for short term political gain – and they really ought to consider what the impact is on their own communities and on their hard men in their communities who will seek any excuse to go back to a terrorist campaign.feedback

Sammy Wilson

One of the intelligent solutions is to use electronic surveillance of trade across the border, using vehicle recognition numbers. – You do not need border posts, you do not need to stop people and you will back up this with occasional physical checks if you felt that that is needed.feedback

Justine Greening - Treasury

None of this changes the fundamental position that this is a devolved issue in Northern Ireland. It is for the Northern Ireland Executive and the Northern Ireland Assembly to decide on their policy going forward. This announcement does not change that position.feedback

Chris Patten

You give people a bung, which is what it is, in order to support you and sooner or later they come back for more bungs. The idea that this is the last time the DUP will ask for loot is crazy. Of course Northern Ireland wants more spending, and so does Scotland, Wales and large parts of England.feedback

Conor Murphy - Sinn Fein

The British Government must accept its responsibility for the failure to reach agreement to date. Its alliance with the DUP has deepened DUP intransigence and arrogance and emboldened its anti-rights, anti-equality agenda. Sinn Féin wants to see the institutions restored but that must be on a credible and sustainable basis, with equality and respect at their core and commanding public confidence. It is make your mind up time for the DUP.feedback

Heidi Allen

I want a Conservative party that people vote for because they want to - not because they feel they have to… right now we are a long way away from that. One of my goals since I became an MP has been to change how people feel about politicians. I want an honest transparent, collaborative, respectful and positive kind of politics. So I can barely put into words my anger at the deal my party has done with the DUP. We didn't need to do it.feedback

Stella Creasy

So can I ask you if you will make a commitment on behalf of this Government to meet with myself and representatives of organisations like Marie Stopes and BPAS and the London Irish Abortion Campaign to look at how we can turn this into a reality so that those women in Northern Ireland today who have finally had their voices heard can use their services as soon as possible?feedback

Frances Ryan

Now that desperate people have seen how money can somehow be found to pay off the DUP, they are going to get very angry with this government. Watch Theresa May scramble in the shadow of no majority and the subsequent paper-thin Queen’s speech and it’s as if government as we know it has been entirely disbanded. While EU negotiations and a costly DUP deal take centre stage (and £1bn of public money) a domestic policy agenda is missing in action.feedback

Simon Jenkins

If the prime minister can borrow for Ulster for two years in government, then she must now extend her largess to the rest of the union. Can anything rescue Theresa May’s reputation from this week’s DUP fiasco? There is not the remotest public interest in political blackmail and bribery, in grinding self-interest, in the dollop of £540 a head to Ulster voters who are already subsidy addicts. It merely tells us what two years in No 10 costs these days: a billion pounds of other people’s money.feedback

Carwyn Jones

It is outrageous that the prime minister believes she can secure her own political future by throwing money at Northern Ireland whilst completely ignoring the rest of the UK. (It) flies in the face of the commitment to build a more united country and further weakens the UK.feedback

Declan Kearney

The DUP have not moved on any of the substantive issues which sit at the heart of this crisis. They haven't moved on any of the fundamental rights and equality issues that require to be embraced.feedback

John O'Dowd

I am not convinced that timescale is the problem. I think it all boils down to a willingness particularly by the DUP and the two governments to resolve the outstanding issues. These are implementation talks about outstanding agreements. Timescale is not the issue. It's a willingness by the participants in the talks. No side has to compromise here because the compromises took place years ago. So there is an onus on the DUP and in particular the two governments to move this process forward.feedback

Robin Swann

We don't see the appointment of a commissioner with the same powers of a high court judge as acceptable. Nor do we see a 10% recruitment on all civil servants being fluent Irish speakers as being something that is necessary in Northern Ireland at this time when we are actually going through a redundancy programme for the civil service.feedback

Ian Paisley

I do respect her genuine interest in this subject, I think it is important the house recognises this is not a matter for Belfast, this is a matter for NHS England.feedback

Stella Creasy

With voices on all sides backing the rights of Northern Irish women to be able to have an abortion in England on the NHS, the government now needs to come clean on just who is stopping them from ensuring these women can use these vital healthcare services in England and Wales and whether the question of abortion access has been discussed as part of their agreement with the DUP.feedback

Liam Neeson

We've had enough of a history in our society in Northern Ireland of discrimination, mistrust and hatred. Yet, we're also an open-hearted, welcoming and terrific people. Let us show that to the world by treating gay, lesbian and transgender peoples as our brothers and sisters and allowing them to marry, if they so wish. By joining the rest of Ireland and other western countries in celebrating equality we can also attract more investment to our province.feedback

James Brokenshire

Our focus is on seeing that the executive is restored and I have been clear on not wanting to pre-empt what may happen should that not be the case. Obviously there would be profound and serious implications in that context.feedback

George Monbiot

There are huge questions about funding, involving the DUP and others. A public inquiry is needed. Should the EU referendum result be annulled? For the past year I’ve been arguing that this would mean defying a democratic decision – even if it was informed by lies. Democracy is not negotiable. But what if this was not a democratic decision? What if it failed to meet the accepted criteria for a free and fair choice? If that were the case, should the result still stand? Surely it should not.feedback

Ruth Davidson

It's absurd for the SNP to criticise UK government spending on top of Barnett in Northern Ireland, when the exact same thing happens in Scotland. And it is incredibly hypocritical for the SNP to complain when, under their reckless plans for independence, they would end the UK's funding deal immediately - leaving Scotland with a £15 billion black hole in our public finances.feedback

Rafael Behr

A hung parliament might have been a moment to reach out beyond the DUP. But the prime minister chose to stick with the old rules. MPs putting plans in their diaries should write them in pencil. Travel far from Westminster is not advised if parliament is sitting. The message from party whips is clear: be ready to drop everything and vote – no excuses, no exceptions.feedback

Owen Jones

Theresa May ruled out fair pay for nurses, then found huge extra sums for Northern Ireland and Buckingham Palace. It’s time to end the austerity con. There is no magic money tree, say the Tories: unless it’s to bribe extremists to keep them in power, or to renovate the palaces of multi-millionaire monarchs. Today, nurses take to the streets to demand an end to a pay freeze that has slashed the living standards of these life-saving, care-giving national heroes. One such nurse confronted Theresa May – whose lack of emotional intelligence is only matched by her lack of authority – on national television before the election. There was no magic money tree, was May’s robotic response. If the nurse had been met with a middle finger, it would scarcely have been less insulting.feedback

Michael Fallon

We all understand that austerity is never over until we've cleared the deficit. We've done a huge amount of work over the last seven years, getting rid of a large chunk of the deficit, but it's still there. We still have to have fiscal controls, you're still going to see that kind of discipline. We've always made additional money available outside the Barnett formula, through city deals in Scotland and Wales, and we've made additional money available in the last few years to Northern Ireland.feedback

Michael Fallon

This is £1bn that will go to improving some investment, improving the infrastructure of the province, growing the private economy of the province, and ensuring its employment rate – which is behind Wales and Scotland – catches up. We all as taxpayers, wherever we are, in England, Wales and Scotland, we all have an interest in Northern Ireland doing better. I saw it described, ridiculously today, as some kind of bung to the DUP. The DUP is not getting this money. The money is going to invest in the people of Northern Ireland.feedback

Gerry Adams - Sinn Fein

The price of today's DUP-Tory deal is DUP support for continued Tory austerity and cuts to public services. It provides a blank check for a Tory Brexit which threatens the Good Friday Agreement.feedback

Nicola Sturgeon

In concluding this grubby, shameless deal, the Tories have shown that they will stop at nothing to hold on to power - even sacrificing the very basic principles of devolution. This deal also raises very serious questions for (Mrs May's) Scottish Secretary. At the weekend, David Mundell was indicating that he would not allow a situation where Northern Ireland received extra funding while Scotland did not.feedback

Jeremy Corbyn

This Tory-DUP deal is clearly not in the national interest but in May's party's interest to help her cling to power. The government must immediately answer two questions. Where is the money for the Tory-DUP deal coming from? And, will all parts of the UK receive the much needed additional funding that Northern Ireland will get as part of the deal?feedback

David Cameron

Task facing PM, given the circs [circumstances], is to deliver the most stable govt [government] possible - today's DUP deal helps achieve that. All Cons [Conservatives] should support.feedback

Nicola Sturgeon

Any sense of fairness sacrificed on the altar of grubby DUP deal to let PM cling to power, and Scots Tories influence in No 10 shown to be zero.feedback

Ian Blackford

After weeks of secret backroom negotiations, the Tories have now signed a grubby deal with the DUP. For years the Tories have been cutting budgets and services, but suddenly they have found a magic money tree to help them stay in power. This was the first big test of the new Scottish Tory MPs, but despite all of their bluster, they clearly have no authority and no influence – and now they have no credibility. Ruth Davidson said they would stand up for Scotland – but instead they have bowed down to their Westminster bosses and sold Scotland out so they can cling to power.feedback

Kezia Dugdale

By attempting to secure her future by throwing money at one part of the UK, the Prime Minister's deal risks weakening the bonds that unite the UK and shows how empty her rhetoric is about the future of the Union.feedback

David Mundell

The financial aspects of this deal entirely sum up how little the Tories care about Scotland – while a billion pounds is being handed over to Northern Ireland, Scotland is seemingly to be offered little more than scraps from the table.feedback

Kezia Dugdale

If the price of propping up this miserable Tory government is hundreds of millions of pounds for Northern Ireland, it is vital that all nations and regions of the UK also get extra funding to end austerity. If Scottish Tory leader Ruth Davidson has any influence in Downing Street at all, she will be demanding extra cash to reverse the spending cuts her government has inflicted on Scotland – aided and abetted by the SNP, which has simply turned Holyrood into a conveyer belt for Tory cuts.feedback

Arlene Foster

In concluding this wide-ranging agreement, we have done so on the basis of advancing the security of our nation, building prosperity for all, and supporting an exit from the European Union that benefits all parts of the United Kingdom.feedback

Grant Shapps

Hmm. No change to Winter Fuel Payments, Triple-Lock Pensions & LongTerm care. With this manifesto, we could have had a stonking majority!feedback

Arlene Foster

I think that this agreement will bring the prospects of doing a deal at Stormont closer because this will have a positive impact in relation to Northern Ireland. I very much hope that this week we will be able to conclude on two agreements.feedback

Arlene Foster

I think that this agreement will bring the prospects of doing a deal at [the Belfast Parliament] Stormont closer because this will have a positive impact in relation to Northern Ireland.feedback

Arlene Foster

We are close to concluding an appropriate agreement with the Conservative Party to support a minority government on a confidence and supply basis. It is a massive opportunity, but a responsibility I do not take lightly. We are determined to utilise this position to help deliver stable government in the United Kingdom and address long-standing issues which affect everyone in Northern Ireland.feedback

Arlene Foster

We're back in London again and my hope is that we will be able to finalize the agreement between ourselves and the Conservative Party. As the Prime Minister herself has said, the deal will be public. It will be totally transparent and once we conclude the deal that will happen.feedback

Gerry Adams - Sinn Fein

The only fair way to get whatever resources come to this place, the only forum or the only decision-making body that can do it in a fair way is the Executive. The price of today's DUP-Tory deal is DUP support for continued Tory Austerity and cuts to public services. The DUP have agreed to support the Tory Government on all motions of confidence; and on the Queen's speech; the Budget; finance bills; money bills, supply and appropriation legislation and estimates and all legislation pertaining to British national security and Brexit.feedback

Emily Thornberry

So for the Government to be putting such an agreement in jeopardy just to prop up this dismal Prime Minister is nothing short of a disgrace.feedback

Colum Eastwood

I know who I'd like to do the spending. I'd like an inclusive executive that represents all of the people of Northern Ireland to be making sure that money is spent properly and for all of our benefit, and not being spent by a Tory party who seem to be under the thumb of the DUP. I think that'd be a very dangerous place for all of us.feedback

Martin Kettle

The prime minister has just given every single voter in Britain a genuine grievance. If ever there was proof of her ineptness, this is surely it. When Martin McGuinness arrived in 10 Downing Street for his first talks with Tony Blair in the build-up to what became the Good Friday agreement, he looked at the cabinet room table and remarked: “So this is where all the damage was done.”.feedback

Theresa May

As we set out at the beginning of talks, we share many values in terms of wanting to see prosperity across the UK, the value of the union, the important bond between different parts of the United Kingdom. We very much want to see that protected and enhanced and we also share the desire to ensure a strong government, able to put through its program and provide for issues like the Brexit negotiations, but also national security issues. So the agreement we have come to is a very, very good one, and I look forward to working with you.feedback

Arlene Foster

I believe we are close to concluding an appropriate agreement with the Conservative Party to support a minority government on a confidence and supply basis...progress has been slow but we continue to work through the issues. We're back in London again and my hope is that we will be able to finalise a deal between ourselves and the Conservative Party. I think that this agreement will bring the prospects of doing a deal at Stormont closer because this will have a positive impact in relation to Northern Ireland.feedback

Theresa Villiers

I don't accept that. There's a lot of public support right across the country for getting power sharing up and running again in Northern Ireland. If the DUP are a fit party to be in government there, I don't see that there's a problem with their reaching this accommodation with the Conservatives.feedback

Theresa Villiers

I think it would be very difficult to lock together the two sets of negotiations, the discussion on confidence and supply and the Stormont talks.feedback

Theresa Villiers

I think that is an indication that we are close to some form of an agreement on the confidence and supply between the Conservatives and the Democratic Unionist Party.feedback

Priti Patel

If you heard what I've just said you'll clearly recognise that I am talking about getting on and doing a good job.feedback

Philip Hammond

We don't agree on everything, but on the big issues about the Union, about the need to grow our economy and to spread the benefits of that growth across all corners of the United Kingdom, on the need to be strong on defence and counter-terrorism - on all of these areas we agree with the Democratic Unionist Party and I am confident that we will be able to come to an arrangement with them to support the Government in the key areas of its programme.feedback

Jeffrey Donaldson

What we are asking for is recognition by the Government that after 30 years of a very violent conflict in Northern Ireland when the capital resources were spent on security - on police stations, fortifications, military establishments - our infrastructure fell well behind the rest of the United Kingdom. So what we are asking for is some help to make up that deficit. What we certainly don't want to see is pensioners and the more vulnerable being affected. If what we do benefits people across the United Kingdom then as a unionist party that is something we are proud of.feedback

Philip Hammond

I am confident that we will be able to come to an arrangement with them (the DUP) to support the government in the key areas of its programme.feedback

Jeffrey Donaldson

They're (talks) going well, we've made progress and I'm hoping we've an agreement before voting on the queen's speech. The prime minister is moving this process, the agreement process, forward. She's engaged now and we welcome that, and I think that since that has happened we have been moving forward.feedback

Jeffrey Donaldson

Actually, I think the prime minister is moving this process forwards. She's engaged now, and we welcome that. I think since that has happened we have been moving forwards.feedback

Jeffrey Donaldson

Those figures would not recognise the fiscal reality in the United Kingdom today. We recognise the realities we're dealing with. The reason for that is we want to bring Northern Ireland up to the same level as the rest of the UK. We believe that in a post-Brexit world, we want the rising tide to lift all the boats, and we want Northern Ireland to benefit from that. If what we do benefits people across the United Kingdom then, as a unionist party, that's something we're proud of.feedback

Jeffrey Donaldson

How tempting it would be to claim these things, but I'm more modest than that.feedback

Damian Green

There's still the possibility, there's every possibility of a DUP deal. The talks have been taking place in a constructive way. Clearly, two political parties, we have some differences. But we have a lot in common. We're both unionist parties at our heart. We're both obviously very concerned with combating terrorism, we both have similar views about delivering a good Brexit for this country and obviously, we're both very, very concerned with the Irish border issue. But all talks of this kind take a long time, and they're still continuing.feedback

Damian Green

Now is absolutely not the time for anything like this. Not at all. One of the things about Theresa May is that she has an enormous sense of duty. She knows that the Conservative party didn't get an absolute majority, but was by far the largest single party. It is her duty, it is our duty, to present our legislative programme to the House of Commons over the next week, and then got on with governing.feedback

Damian Green

As people will see today, this is not a thin Queen's speech. Apart from all the Brexit elements there's huge domestic elements, about the economy, about infrastructure, about fighting injustices, helping people and all of that.feedback

Chris Grayling

We're having good constructive discussions and I'm confident that we'll reach a sensible agreement. The talks are going on, they are going well.feedback

Hannah White

Then, drawing on the support of the DUP or other parties, they may be able to make any amendments they need at the report stage.feedback

Theresa May

Much has been said in recent days about what the general election signified about Britain's decision to leave the EU. The fact is that over 80% of the electorate backed the two major parties, both of whom campaigned on manifestos that said we should honour the democratic decision of the British people.feedback

Hannah White

Getting legislation through the Commons should be possible with effective whipping. While government and opposition numbers on public bill committees will be evenly balanced, procedural conventions around the way the chair votes when a committee vote is tied mean the Conservatives should be able to get bills through committees without any amendments.feedback

Ian Lavery

This is chaos from a weak and wobbly prime minister. At the moment, it looks like the Tories are unable to put together even a basic programme for government in the Queen's speech, or stitch together a stable deal with the DUP to stay in office.feedback

Frances O'Grady

Theresa May failed to win a mandate at the ballot box for her no-deal Brexit. Instead, we need a Brexit deal that puts jobs and rights at work first.feedback

Michelle O'Neill

I will be making it very clear that any deal between the Tories and the DUP cannot be allowed to undermine the Good Friday and subsequent agreements.feedback

David Davis

How on earth do you resolve the issue of the border with Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland unless you know what our general borders policy is, what the customs agreement is, what our trade agreement is? It's wholly illogical. and we happen to think the wrong interpretation of the treaty, so that'll be the row of the summer.feedback

Sammy Wilson

One of the intelligent solutions is to use electronic surveillance of trade across the border using vehicle recogntion number, matching that up to the invoices which people will have to supply anyway and do supply at present, and that's one way of monitoring trade back and forth across the border. You don't need border posts, you don't need to stop people ; of course you would back that up with the occasional physical checks if you felt that that was needed.feedback

Arlene Foster

I think you know it takes two to tango and we're ready to dance.feedback

Tom Tugendhat

Is it worth it? Can an agreement creates the perception of a link between Conservatives, homophobic attitudes, Protestant militias and illiberal policies really yield the five years of stability our country so desperately needs? If it could, it would be worth the sacrifice in the national interest. But I need to be convinced.feedback

Martin McGuinness

Oh aye, Margaret Thatcher was a good woman. I believe she was sincere and honourable, but of course at night she was sore on the bottle, very sore on the bottle. I have seen her almost drunk, aye.feedback

Arlene Foster

The Queen's Speech is not the be all and end all in relation to the negotiations that we have been having with the Conservative Party but I do hope that in the national interest we are able to conclude these talks as quickly as possible.feedback

John Cleland

It will showcase to the world just how daft the DUP is. Maybe we can get some sensible politics here rather than this tribal nonsense.feedback

Sharon Skillen

Arlene Foster needs to think about everyone and she needs to think again about gay marriage. She needs to live and let live. I'm a Protestant. I hope she works it out for everyone. It's about time Northern Ireland grew up and took an adult approach to politics.feedback

Nicola Sturgeon

Look at what the Tories [Conservatives] have managed to do to the UK in the space of just one year, firstly calling a divisive and reckless EU referendum .. then having lost that gamble pursuing a hard Brexit path. And if that wasn't enough, calling an unnecessary general election purely for the self interest of the Conservative Party and having mucked that campaign up they are now putting the country in hock to the DUP.feedback

Nicola Sturgeon

Look at what the Tories (Conservatives) have managed to do to the UK in the space of just one year, firstly calling a divisive and reckless EU referendum .. then having lost that gamble pursuing a hard Brexit path. And if that wasn't enough, calling an unnecessary general election purely for the self interest of the Conservative Party and having mucked that campaign up they are now putting the country in hock to the DUP.feedback

Tim Farron

I am passionate about defending the rights and liberties of people who believe very different things to me.feedback

Simon Hughes - The Telegraph

He said very clearly he had become the subject of suspicion because of what I believe or what my faith is ... and it would be the same for people of other faiths who have strong faith views. Where there are issues which are very controversial within that faith community it became unfairly difficult that Tim was put in the firing line and felt that he couldn't adequately do justice to his faith while upholding the liberal values which he has argued for all his life.feedback

Michelle O'Neill

Progress will not come from a deal between the DUP and Tories to prop up a Government in Westminster with an austerity and Brexit agenda but through the full implementation of the agreements and an Executive that respects the rights and delivers for all in society.feedback

John Major

I am wary about the deal and I am dubious about it. The UK government needs to be impartial between all the competing interests in Northern Ireland. The danger is that however much any Government tries they will not be seen as impartial if they are locked into a parliamentary deal at Westminster with one of the Northern Ireland parties.feedback

John Major

I am concerned about the deal, I am wary about it, I am dubious about it, both for peace process reasons but also for other reasons as well. People shouldn't regard it as a given. It isn't certain, it is under stress. It is fragile. And although I don't expect it suddenly to collapse – because there is a broad consensus that wishes it to continue – I think we have to take care with it, and take care that everything we do does not exaggerate the underlying differences that still are there in the Northern Ireland community.feedback

Theresa May

We remain steadfast in our commitment to the Belfast agreement. A discussion taking place on the Northern Ireland executive and our focus is absolute. In talks with DUP we want to ensure with their support we give stability which is important ahead of the Brexit negotiations. Our intent is to have stability in the national interest. We have worked with the DUP before.feedback

Pearse Doherty

It does cause serious strain in relation to the potential of getting an executive up and running, if we have that type of relationship.feedback

Arlene Foster

Discussions are going well with the government and we hope soon to be able to bring this work to a successful conclusion.feedback

Jon Tonge

The longer the Conservatives try to stay in power without an election, the more the DUP can ask for. Once they've trousered the economic goodies, then the next items on their shopping list could be conflict-related issues, could be Protestant unionist British issues. It's at that point that things become much more fraught.feedback

Jon Tonge

No one really knew or cared about the DUP. But on election night as the arithmetic began to stack up, suddenly the DUP were the only people who could get the Conservatives over the line and everything changed. A lot of places in England are utterly ignorant about Northern Ireland and its politics. People scrambling around to find out about who the DUP are. ... I mean, the DUP have been around since 1971. The level of ignorance is something else.feedback

Jon Tonge

The DUP say there have been far too many investigations into what British soldiers and the British state did more broadly in the conflict. They effectively want almost immunity from prosecution for soldiers.feedback

John Major

If there are difficulties with the Northern Ireland executive or with any one of a number of things that might well arise during the Brexit negotiations, it is very important that there's an honest broker. And the only honest broker can be the UK government. And the question arises, if they cease to be seen as such by part of the community in Northern Ireland, then one can't be quite certain how events will unwind. And that worries me a great deal about the peace process.feedback

John Major

The danger is however much any government tries, they will not be seen to be impartial if they are locked into a parliamentary deal at Westminster with one of the Northern Ireland parties. And you never know in what unpredictable way events will turn out and we cannot know if that impartiality is going to be crucial at some stage in the future. If there are difficulties with the Northern Ireland executive or any one of a number of things that could arise during the Brexit negotiations, it is very important that there is an honest broker.feedback

John Major

If there difficulties with the Northern Ireland executive or with any one of a number of things that might well arise during the Brexit negotiations, it is very important that there's an honest broker. And the only honest broker can be the UK government.feedback

Arlene Foster

We enter these talks in a positive fashion. We are, first and foremost, Unionists, and therefore we want to secure the Union. And as I said on Friday after the election, the Union is my guiding star, so we will be looking to make sure the Union stays strong. But we do want to do so in the national interest to give stability to the government and that's the way in which we'll be entering these negotiations.feedback

Michelle Gildernew - Sinn Fein

This new arrangement is very unsettling and people are concerned and wary of what it may mean, and what promises will be given or promises extracted from Theresa May. We've already heard some of the things that have been asked for, issues that have been put to bed a long time ago are now raising their head again.feedback

Jeremy Corbyn

We will continue to take the fight to the Tories and I will be out campaigning around the country in Conservative marginals in those extra seats we need to gain to deliver the government for the many that almost 13 million people voted for last week. We have a government in complete disarray still unable to reach an agreement, it seems, with the DUP and desperately delaying the Queen's Speech and Brexit negotiations. Far from being strong and stable, the government Theresa May is putting together is weak, wobbly and out of control. This is a government on notice from the voters.feedback

Jeremy Corbyn

Now the election is over, the next phase of our campaign to win power for the majority has already begun. We must remain in permanent campaign mode on a general election footing. We achieved what we did last Thursday because we were a united party during the campaign and we need to maintain that unity and collective discipline in the weeks and months ahead. We have a government in complete disarray still unable to reach an agreement, it seems, with the DUP and desperately delaying the Queen's Speech and Brexit negotiations.feedback

John Major

W e need to be prepared for the unexpected, we need to hope for the best but prepare for the worst. The last thing anybody wishes to see is one or other of the communities so aggrieved that the hard men, who are still there lurking in the corners of the communities, decide that they wish to return to some form of violence. I think we have to take care with it and take care that everything we do does not exaggerate the underlying differences that still are there in the Northern Ireland community.feedback

Martin Kettle

In the scrabble for a majority, Theresa May seems to have again rushed into an unnecessary response, overlooking the unionists’ cumbersome baggage. “I’m the person who got us into this mess,” Theresa May told Tory MPs on Monday, “and I’m the one who will get us out of it.” The prime minister is right about the first half of that statement. But she is wrong about the second half. She has not learned from her humbling at the polls last week. In April, she rushed into an unnecessary election. Now, amid the political debris of that error, she is again rushing prematurely into an unnecessary response, in the shape of a destructive pact with the Democratic Unionists in June.feedback

Nigel Dodds

We intend to carry out that responsibility very, very carefully indeed. We hope, of course, for the restoration as soon as possible of our locally-devolved assembly and executive in Northern Ireland, where everybody can play a part in the Government of Northern Ireland.feedback

John Major

I am concerned about the deal, I am wary about wary it, I am dubious about it, both for peace process reasons but also for other reasons as well.feedback

John Major

A fundamental part of that peace process is that the UK government needs to be impartial between all the competing interests in Northern Ireland. The danger is that however much any government tries, they will not be seen to be impartial if they are locked into a parliamentary deal, at Westminster, with one of the Northern Ireland parties. The question arises – if they cease to be seen as such by part of the community in Northern Ireland, then one can't be quite certain how events will unwind. And that worries me a great deal about the peace process.feedback

John Major

That is going to cause a great degree of grievance elsewhere. They would see it as the government paying cash for votes in parliament, and in doing so I think that could well cost votes in the country for the Conservative party, by the bucketload, at a subsequent election.feedback

Owen Jones

The idea that people won’t vote for socialist policies has been comprehensively debunked. Why change tack when Labour is in the ascendancy?The Tories’ self-immolation is quite the spectacle. Weeks ago, they genuinely believed they were on the brink of extinguishing Labour as an effective electoral force. They now have a leader with no authority; they will be rendered ever more toxic by their alliance with the homophobic, anti-choice, climate-change-denying fundamentalists of the DUP; a civil war between liberal remainers, hard Brexiteers, and DUP fanatics beckons; there’s the tangled mess of Brexit negotiations while the British government is the laughing stock of Europe; both wages and the economy are set to slide on the Tories’ watch; every day means thousands of 18th birthdays across the country, and thousands of new Labour supporters, too. Labour already has a sizable poll lead – and the only way for the Tories currently, it seems, is down.feedback

Natika Halil

FPA believes that the government must legislate for abortion law reform in Northern Ireland. The UK government is responsible for human rights across the UK, and the United Nations and UK courts have ruled on multiple occasions that Northern Ireland's restrictive law contravenes these rights. Any potential arrangement with the DUP must not prevent the UK from meeting any human rights commitments. Instead, the Conservative party must use any partnership with the DUP to discuss the impact of Northern Ireland's abortion law and bring it into the 21st century.feedback

Nicola Sturgeon

Now that the Queen's Speech has been postponed, questions have been raised about what has been cooked up behind closed doors and is it possible for this Prime Minister – notwithstanding what she said on Friday – to put together a Government that is functional and sustainable. It is an opportunity, perhaps – I know the arithmetic, I am not blind to the hurdles – but it perhaps means an opportunity for a progressive alternative to a Tory/DUP government.feedback

George Osborne

If the [Scottish Conservative leader] Ruth Davidsons of the world are starting to flex their muscles, then in my view that's a good thing.feedback

Nigel Farage

If Brexit (which the) British people voted for gets betrayed, I would have no choice but to throw myself back into full-time campaigning. I think she has to go. If it's going to be a Brexit government, then someone who believes in it must be in position.feedback

David Mundell

I think change is brought about, certainly in Northern Ireland, by persuasion, by people working together and the best way actually to achieve these is to get the Northern Ireland Assembly back up and running, and I hope that will also be possible.feedback

David Mundell

I don't subscribe to the DUP's position on these issues but the DUP will not be influencing these decisions within the rest of the United Kingdom. We're not in any way signing up to the DUP manifesto. Most of these issues are devolved to the Northern Ireland Assembly. I would like to see the DUP change its position, and indeed Northern Ireland as a whole change its position, on LGBTI issues. Ruth Davidson has been very clear on that, she actually went out to Northern Ireland and set that out, so they can't be in any doubt where they stand on these issues.feedback

Nicola Sturgeon

The Good Friday Agreement requires the UK Government to be an impartial broker between parties in Northern Ireland and it would be shameful if, in the Tories' pursuit of power, they jeopardised the chances of a return to devolved government in Northern Ireland.feedback

Kevin Meagher

I think the DUP will play its advantage very carefully, focusing on pork barrel sweeteners.feedback

Peter Hain

You've got to be neutral. If the prime minister is dependent on the DUP then all sorts of backroom deals will be done which could impact on the Good Friday process – could put it in jeopardy and could destroy confidence amongst other parties.feedback

Boris Johnson

Without an absolute majority we will now have to coordinate with the DUP. But that is feasible – and before Labour object, someone should remind them they tried to do exactly the same thing in 2010. To those that say the PM should step down, or that we need another election or even – God help us – a second referendum, I say, come off it. Get a grip, everyone.feedback

John Oliver

Yes, this was a clusterfuck or, to be more precise, a crumpet-fuck, of epic proportions. Theresa May is hanging onto her job by a thread. To stay in power, she's attempting to cut a distasteful deal with the DUP, a hardline anti-gay, anti-abortion party in Northern Ireland, which has opened her up to even more criticism. Meanwhile, there are rumors of a leadership challenge from within her own party by Boris Johnson, a grown man who perpetually looks like a seven-year-old who just spun in circles for three minutes and is about to throw up.feedback

Ruth Culverston

I voted DUP. I used to follow the parade. My parents and brothers always used to go on the Drumcree parade. That would be the main thing to ask for. It was 20 years ago they last went down the road. It's only one day a year. Why not?feedback

Willie Frazer

Soldiers never chose to come to Northern Ireland where sometimes, maybe, they made a mistake. I don't think they should be given an amnesty – that implies they did something wrong. A pardon would be better.feedback

Robert McCann

At this time of year you get all sorts of idiots out on both sides. About a month ago there was 20 of them who got off a bus and were trying to rip down a tricolour. They threw bottles and stones. Someone was beaten up.feedback

William McGuffin

Every Sunday an Orange Order delegation takes a petition to the bridge below in protest at being blocked. And there's always three carloads of policemen [ensuring they don't go through]. That's some money.feedback

Arlene Foster

I have no doubt over time those responsible will look foolish in the extreme. In truth, no-one expected the outcome of the snap general election to be a hung Parliament, and for the DUP to be in such an influential position. The mandate given to us by the people will be used responsibly. We stood on a clear policy platform of wanting to strengthen the Union, of working for a good deal for Northern Ireland as the United Kingdom leaves the EU and of promising to do our best to get Stormont up and running again for the benefit of all.feedback

Arlene Foster

Discussions [with the Conservative government] will continue next week to work on the details and to reach agreement on arrangements for the new parliament.feedback

Enda Kenny

Spoke w PM May - indicated my concern that nothing should happen to put GoodFridayAgrmt at risk & absence of nationalist voice in Westminster.feedback

Arlene Foster

We've made good progress but the discussions continue. We will of course act in the national interest and do what is right for the national interest and do what is right for the United Kingdom as a whole and of course Northern Ireland in particular. A lot of people really don't know what we stand for.feedback

Jeremy Corbyn

Listen, is it credible that with all the issues facing our country, all the issues of inequality and injustice and the Brexit talks and everything else that you have a Government that cannot actually gain a majority in the House of Commons except by doing a deal with a very socially conservative DUP? Come on, we need something more responsible than that.feedback

Jonathan Powell

If Mrs May depends on the DUP – Ian Paisley's party, not the old Official Unionists, who used in the past to work with the Tories – to form a government, it will be impossible for it to be even-handed. The other parties in Northern Ireland will know that the unionists can pull the plug at any stage and hold the government hostage.feedback

Arlene Foster

There has been a lot of hyperbole about the DUP since Thursday, a lot of things said, a lot of people who really don't know what we stand for. Just to be clear, we will act in the national interest. We want to do what is right for the whole of the UK and to bring stability to the Government of the United Kingdom.feedback

Michael Fallon

Well, let's be very clear, just because they're going to support us, they're agreeing to support us on the economic issues, the big economic and security issues facing this country, it doesn't mean that we now agree with all of their views. We don't. We're not in government with the DUP . We're not in coalition with the DUP. They're going to support us, as I said, on the crucial economic and security issues that face this country. We do not agree and we do not have to agree with any of their views on these social issues.feedback

Arlene Foster

There's been a lot of hyperbole about the DUP since Thursday – a lot of things said, a lot of people who really don't know what we stand for. But just to be clear, we will act in the national interest, we want to do what's right for the whole of the UK and to bring stability to the government of the United Kingdom.feedback

Theresa May

We will welcome any such deal being agreed, as it will provide the stability and certainty the whole country requires as we embark on Brexit and beyond. As and when details are finalised, both parties will put them forward.feedback

Graham Brady

There are only two choices. One is for us to get on, in what I think is the responsible way, and try to form a government and try to offer the right kind of responsible leadership that the country needs. The other would be to go back to the country for another general election. I don't detect any desire amongst the British public to go through the whole process of a general election again.feedback

Tom Watson

A Tory-DUP alliance will be so fragile that it could collapse under the weight of disapproval from the prime minister’s MPs alone. This coalition cannot last. Theresa May has spent her weekend sacking her closest advisers and carrying out an emergency cabinet reshuffle in a desperate attempt to avoid taking responsibility for a disastrous election campaign and save her premiership. According to one of her former advisers, she is “friendless and alone”. She deserves to be.feedback

Arlene Foster

I had no need to say it to Jackie McDonald. [He] knows my views. If people want to move away from criminality, from terrorism, we will help them do that, but anyone who is engaged in this sort of activity should stop, should desist, and if they don't they should be open to the full rigour of the law.feedback

John O'Dowd

It beggars belief that only two days after the UDA murdered Colin Horner … Arlene Foster did not challenge a senior UDA leader to disband the armed loyalist gang.feedback

Ian Paisley

If dissidents are shot on sight, the community will accept that it is a necessary use of lethal force to prevent dissident republicanism from growing.feedback

Arlene Foster

Discussions continue but we have made good progress. I am not going to negotiate over the airwaves. But we will act in the national interest and do what it right for the United Kingdom as a whole and in particular for Northern Ireland. There has been a lot of hyperbole since Thursday. A lot of things said, a lot by people who really don't know what we stand for. Just to be clear, we will act in the national interest, we want to do what is right for the whole of the UK, we want to bring stability to he government of the United Kingdom.feedback

Michael Fallon

The new Cabinet obviously will meet early next week. Our view of Brexit I don't think has changed. We want a partnership with Europe, we want an agreement that maximises our access to the single market, comes to an arrangement on immigration, continues the security cooperation we already have with Europe.feedback

Michael Fallon

I think we have a majority for that, yes, I think everybody wants to see an agreement in the end that does respect what the British people voted for last year, makes sure that our cooperation with Europe continues, our trade with Europe continues, our security cooperation with Europe continues.feedback

Ruth Davidson

It's an issue very close to my heart and one that I wanted categoric assurances from the prime minister on, and I received (them). I could not care less what people get up to in terms of their sexuality. That's not a matter for me. When it becomes a matter for me is when people try to redefine marriage.feedback

Paul Bew

They are not Attila the Hun. They've been doing deals with Sinn Fein for 10 years now. Some people who are not paying attention think they are as they were 30 years ago. I'm not saying they are now liberals, but they've come a long way since then. Northern Ireland gets 10 billion pounds a year from the U.K. exchequer, and that needs to continue. Everything else is peanuts.feedback

Ian Paisley

You have to realise that while sin is black and white, life is a lot of grey.feedback

Owen Paterson

It's not only a free vote issue, most of this, but it's nearly all devolved and that's down to the politicians in Northern Ireland to resolve. She's perfectly fair to raise it ... these issues are devolved, and if they were sorted in the UK Parliament they'd be free vote issues. I really don't see them colouring the talks.feedback

Jonathan Powell

Even John Major didn't resort to relying on DUP... This could undo 20 years of work in Northern Ireland.feedback

Arlene Foster

They are not going to influence me by sending me abuse – in fact, they are going to send me in the opposite direction and people need to reflect on that. I could not care less what people get up to in terms of their sexuality, that's not a matter for me – when it becomes a matter for me is when people try to redefine marriage.feedback

Arlene Foster

I would not want abortion to be as freely available here as it is in England. You might get a debate I suppose on further reduction of abortion times as medical science advances.feedback

Ruth Davidson

I was fairly straightforward with her and I told her that there were a number of things that count to me more than party. One of them is country, one of the others is LGBTI (Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender and Intersex) rights.feedback

Arlene Foster

No one wants to see a hard Brexit, what we want to see is a workable plan to leave the European Union... we need to do it in a way that respects the specific circumstances of Northern Ireland, and, of course, our shared history and geography with the Republic of Ireland.feedback

Jonathan Powell

It’s essential not to undermine the government’s position as an impartial mediator, says the former chief negotiator. Mrs May agreed a loose alliance with the Northern Irish Democratic Unionist party (DUP) yesterday to prop up her government. I believe this is a terrible mistake with lasting consequences and not just for the very valid reasons raised by Ruth Davidson, leader of the Scottish Tories, about the DUP’s attitudes to LGBTI rights.feedback

Ruth Davidson

As a Protestant Unionist about to marry an Irish Catholic, here's the Amnesty Pride lecture I gave in Belfast. I was fairly straightforward with her (Mrs May) and I told her that there were a number of things that count to me more than the party. One of them is country, one of the others is LGBTI rights. I asked for a categoric assurance that if any deal or scoping deal was done with the DUP there would be absolutely no rescission (repeal) of LGBTI rights in the rest of the UK, and that we would use any influence that we had to advance LGBTI rights in Northern Ireland.feedback

Ian Paisley

We want to make sure that Brexit is properly introduced and we will be the effective and possibly sole voice in Parliament from Northern Ireland on Brexit. We'll be making sure we get the best deal for all of Northern Ireland.feedback

Nigel Dodds

It's wrong to say we're not in favor of a soft Brexit. We want a situation where the best deal is arranged for Northern Ireland.feedback

Ruth Davidson

We need to ensure on behalf of the country there's a Queen's Speech brought forward. We need to ensure the processes of government continue but we also need to make sure that we listen to the message the people of the UK have sent in the last 24 hours.feedback

Ruth Davidson

As a Protestant Unionist about to marry an Irish Catholic, here's the Amnesty Pride lecture I gave in Belfast... I am practicing Christian. I am a protestant. I am a Unionist. I am Scottish and British.feedback

Ruth Davidson

What's clear is that we need to ensure that as the parliament reconvenes in Westminster, the Government brings forward a Queen's Speech on the 19th and I support all efforts to do that.feedback

Arlene Foster

It will be difficult for her to survive given that she was presumed at the start of the campaign, which seems an awfully long time ago, to come back with maybe a hundred, maybe more, in terms of her majority. I certainly think that there will be contact made over the weekend but I think it's too soon to talk about what we're going to do. I think we need to wait and see.feedback

Paul Givan

Christians do not feel there is space being made for their religious beliefs.feedback

Simon Hamilton

Mr Hunter has had an active interest in Northern Ireland for a long time. He's over here on regular jaunts nowadays.feedback

John Swinney

As the first minister has said in the early hours of this morning, we will take time and care to reflect on the outcome of this result, but we have to acknowledge that the question of a second independence referendum was a significant motivator of votes against the SNP in this election and we have to be attentive to that point. We're in the early moments of the aftermath of this election, we've got a lot to digest, a lot to think about.feedback