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Last quote about Ryanair

Mark Simpson - Goodbody
This is a pinch they are facing. But it hasn't reached a crisis point.feedback
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Sep 22 2017
Michael O'Leary, Kenny Jacobs and Neil Sorahan, are the people who have been quoted the greatest number of times about Ryanair. You can find them on this page and an additional total of 67 people who have something to say about this topic. All the 206 quotes on this page are sorted by date and by name. You can also have access to the articles to get the context of the quotes. The most recent quote from Michael O'Leary is: “One of the issues we have to deal with is that we may have got pilot pay a little on the low side.”.
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Loizos Heracleous

Ryanair's profitability leads the industry in terms of gross and net margins. Its growth is fast and ambitious. This impact cannot be quantified at the moment, but in any case Ryanair's other cost advantages arising from lean organization design and processes, and general efficiency culture will remain.feedback

Graziano Delrio

We cannot make allowances for anyone who creates so much inconvenience.feedback

James Daley

Ryanair has made this mistake and it needs to be gong out of its way to help customers claim what they are rightfully owed. The rules are very clear about what airlines' obligations are, and Ryanair has been around long enough to know what it needs to do. The least it can do is make the compensation process as easy as possible. Talking obliquely about rights is not good enough. It should be serving it up in black and white.feedback

Pierre Vanhollebeek

So I can't access the reimbursement and compensation pages. I am completely blocked for now.feedback

Pierre Vanhollebeek

For the moment, there's no compensation. I went to the Ryanair site for a refund of my flight, in addition to compensation for additional costs. And it's the same thing for several hours. The website gives me an error message.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

We will not be trying to claim exceptional circumstances. This is our mess up. When we make a mess in Ryanair, we come out with our hands up. We try to explain why we made the mess. We will pay compensation to those passengers entitled to compensation which will be those flights that are cancelled over the next two weeks.feedback

Graziano Delrio

It's caused a huge amount of inconvenience for Italians and we insist on the absolute respect for passengers' rights. We will monitor the situation, but we can't make allowances for such a huge amount of disruption.feedback

Fabrizio Premuti

Ryanair is a very important contributor to the Italian economy, but they have made a big mistake. The shock that the airline has created has left people thinking that we will try to cure a sick flagship company with a medicine that will make it even worse. Those responsible for selling Alitalia will have to pay close attention and consider the best interests of the country and Italian citizens. We need to find a way to ensure that Alitalia stays alive, but with all the guarantees. In this respect, it doesn't seem as if Ryanair will be able to ensure this.feedback

Carrie Ann Woodgate

I feel pure frustration and anger at Ryanair for leaving us stuck in the middle of Poland. We rely on these companies to get us home.feedback

Kenny Jacobs

We are on average all around €400 out of pocket, with one of the grooms still stuck in France until tomorrow. The entire wedding party has been split up, I had to fly to Southampton and make my way to London. Some are in the midlands, some Birmingham and some just decided to hire a car and drive. It feels like it's put a big downer on the wedding.feedback

Kirstin Armsden

We're in the middle of France with no phone signals - currently in the nearest town. (There are) 15 girls on a hen party we are now having to split up to go home with the majority of the party leaving a night early which means we've paid for a villa we're not using and it's cutting into our holiday.feedback

Carrie Ann Woodgate

If it is a lack of staff or late flights, they knew this was coming. It is a perfect storm.feedback

Barbara Moss

I looked for alternative flights with the airline, but nothing was available until Friday [22 September].feedback

Kirstin Armsden

A lot of the party are getting a 24 hour bus home - one of these girls is pregnant another suffers from Crohn's disease - as other flights were extortionately priced.feedback

Barbara Moss

There was no assistance. We waited until Saturday morning when the [information] line was supposed to reopen, but it just stated that no agents were available.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

I would be very worried about any pilots leaving Ryanair or any other airline to go to Norwegian. I don't believe Norwegian will survive the next 12 months.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

This issue will not recur in 2018 as Ryanair goes back on to a 12-month calendar leave. Ryanair is not short of pilots – we were able to fully crew our peak summer schedule.feedback

Leslie Lee

Even though I've been offered a partial refund for the unused flight, which cost £70, the cancellation has set me back about £500 and I'm worried that Ryanair won't compensate me. What's worse is that I spoke to my travel insurance company and it doesn't seem like my policy covers a situation like this.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

While over 98 per cent of our customers will not be affected by these cancellations over the next six weeks, we apologise unreservedly to those customers whose travel will be disrupted, and assure them that we have done our utmost to try to ensure that we can re-accommodate most of them on alternative flights on the same or next day. This is a mess of our own making. I apologise sincerely to all our customers for any worry or concern this has caused them over the past weekend.feedback

Damian Brewer - RBC Capital Markets

These seem like compounding issues to a lack of staff planning - that risks over-trading when there was little slack in its system for the unpredictable, or...loss of flight deck crew to other low-cost carriers like Norwegian.feedback

Damian Brewer - RBC Capital Markets

History has not been kind to low-cost carriers that cannot deliver - for example we still find that Vuelling retains its low skytrax ratings and we believe it has to discount hardest where it faces competition in order to sell its product.feedback

Kenny Jacobs

Cancellation notices for flights cancelled up to and including Wednesday 20th September have been sent to affected customers and posted on the Ryanair.com website. We will continue to send regular updates and post flight information on our website, with the next set of cancellations to be issued on Monday. We apologise sincerely to all affected customers for these cancellations.feedback

Fiona Macrae

The majority of standard travel insurance policies will not cover you for accommodation and associated costs if your airline cancels your flight, they will only cover specific limited reasons for cancellation. So, unless your travel insurance policy specifically states that cover is provided for airlines cancelling your flight, you will not be able to make a successful claim for this situation.feedback

Kenny Jacobs

We have messed up in the planning of pilot holidays and we're working hard to fix that. Flights are operating as scheduled unless an email confirming a cancellation has been received.feedback

Robin Kiely - Ryanair

We apologise sincerely to the small number of customers affected by these cancellations, and will be doing our utmost to arrange alternative flights and/or full refunds for them. We have operated a record schedule and traffic numbers during the peak summer months of July and August but must now allocate annual leave to pilots and cabin crew in September and October while still running the bulk of our summer schedule. This increased leave at a time of ATC capacity delays and strikes (in France), has severely reduced our on-time performance over the past two weeks to under 80 percent.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

We will not pay for flights on other airlines. We cannot afford to pay the high costs of our competitors. This is clearly a mess-up. But it is my mess-up, and a mess I have to clear up.feedback

Rebecca O'Keefe - Interactive Investor

Ryanair is notorious for not caring about what sort of headlines they get, working on the basis that all publicity is good publicity – but not this time. Previously, the carrier was happy to suggest that you get what you pay for and despite negative press lots of flyers embraced the fact that they knew the score and were happy to fly without the frills.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

We did not focus on the concern we were causing to the 18 million passengers flying with us over the next six weeks. I say sorry to them.feedback

Rebecca O'Keefe - Interactive Investor

If the former, then it suggests some truly poor processes. If the latter, then we may see wages rise to fill the gaps. Either way, it's not good news for Ryanair.feedback

Coby Benson

Ryanair argues that the Irish courts have exclusive jurisdiction. We simply can't issue court proceedings against them in England.feedback

Kenny Jacobs

We will cancel 40 to 50 flights daily for the next six weeks, (less than 2% of our schedule) with a slightly higher number this weekend as we begin to implement these cancellations. Flights are operating as scheduled unless an email confirming a cancellation has been received. We advise customers to check the email address used to make their booking. Cancellation notices for flights cancelled up to and including Wednesday 20 Sept have been sent to affected customers and we will continue to send regular updates and post flight information on our website.feedback

Kenny Jacobs

We will cancel 40 to 50 flights daily for the next six weeks, less than 2% of our schedule, with a slightly higher number initially, as we begin to implement these cancellations. Flights are operating as scheduled unless an email confirming a cancellation has been received. Cancellation notices for flights cancelled up to and including Wednesday 20 Sept have been sent to affected customers and posted on the Ryanair.com website.feedback

Robin Kiely - Ryanair

We have operated a record schedule and traffic numbers during the peak summer months of July and August but must now allocate annual leave to pilots and cabin crew in September and October. By cancelling less than two per cent of our flying programme over the next six weeks, until our winter schedule starts in early November, we can improve the operational resilience of our schedules and restore punctuality to our annualised target of 90 per cent.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

Ultimately, they cannot and will not be changing the Irish contracts or the structure of the Irish contracts. This won't change Ryanair's cost base by one cent.feedback

Thomas Ramdahl

We're still talking to Ryanair. We have a solution that works for two parties within the low-cost model, so we can easily bring this solution onto Ryanair if they are willing to join us.feedback

Philip Hammond

No it's clearly not. Anyone who's visited Dover will know that Dover operates as a flow-through port and volumes of trade at Dover could not accommodated if goods had to be held for inspection even, I suspect, if they were held for minutes, it would still impede the operation of the port. Roll-on, roll-off traffic at Dover is predicated on trucks rolling off a ferry immediately, [going] out of the port and the ferry reloading and departing pretty rapidly – Ryanair style turnaround times.feedback

Crispin Odey

He's given up with outsiders. The only other company that's like this is Ryanair.feedback

Jennifer Rogers

I don't think they do allocate seats randomly. Ryanair have said that they save the window and aisle seats. I think the rows will be randomly allocated, but you will be given a middle seat and then they fill up from there.feedback

Jennifer Rogers

Therefore, we can calculate the probability of being allocated four middle seats on this flight as 1 in 500. Carrying out similar calculations for the other flights, and then combining these probabilities together, I was able to calculate the probability of four researchers being allocated middle seats on their four flights, if the seating allocation was indeed random, as 1:543,094,880. A tiny probability.feedback

Kenny Jacobs

This is entirely a matter of customer choice. We are very happy to facilitate any customer who wants a free of charge random seat but we are also going to do our best to facilitate customers who are willing to pay for a reserved seat (usually window or aisle) which start from £2.feedback

Kenny Jacobs

No, this claim isn't true. When a customer does not purchase a seat, they are randomly allocated a seat. The algorithm changes on each flight and each route by reference to demands for reserved seats.feedback

Kenny Jacobs

We believe offering bigger bags at reduced fees will encourage more customers to consider checking in a bag, which will reduce the high volume of customers we have with two carry-on bags at the boarding gates, which is causing flight delays due to large numbers of gate bag and cabin bag offloads. We hope that by restricting non-priority customers to one small carry-on bag, this will speed up the boarding of flights and eliminate flight delays being caused by not having sufficient overhead cabin space on busy flights to accommodate over 360 carry-on bags.feedback

Kenny Jacobs

A number of people will have two very large bags, taking up someone else's space. They'll hope they'll get away with it and generally they have, but we don't want to go back to policing bags at the gate. These bag policy changes will cost Ryanair more than €50m a year in reduced checked bag fees. However, we believe offering bigger bags at reduced fees will encourage more customers to consider checking in a bag.feedback

Kenny Jacobs

We hope that restricting non-priority customers to one small carry-on bag will speed up the boarding of flights and eliminate delays being caused by not having sufficient overhead cabin space on busy flights.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

We will be submitting an offer for the 90 jet aircraft, with their pilots, cabin crew, routes etc.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

What is increasingly likely to happen is that there will be no flights. Mrs May and the Brexiteers will be trying to explain that to you in 12 months' time, why getting a car to Scotland or a ferry to Ireland are the only options on offer.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

If Britain gets pushed out of the EU , it is absolutely the legal position that flights must stop. You've got to negotiate that bilaterally. And yet David Davies and the other geniuses in Brussels can't negotiate the departure bill, the EU citizen rights ... they haven't got round to talking about aviation. If we don't know the legal basis for which they're being operated we'll be forced to cancel those flights by December 2018 so we can put those flights on sale in Europe.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

You'll see not just us but other airlines start to scream at Mrs May. We have to deal with the discomfort to our fellow passengers, diversions of aircraft, and danger when it becomes out of hand.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

That ownership and control structure won't survive a hard Brexit. Even the Germans can see their way through that one. The charade is going to be hugely ineffective.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

What the British have underestimated is to the extent that the voices in Europe are lobbying against a deal on flights ... There's an increasing awareness in the corridors of power in Paris, Brussels and Frankfurt that aviation is the one to stick it to the British government over, because [its effects] come six months before March 2019. All bookings for summer 2019 will carry a government health warning, that this is subject to regulatory approval.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

The French and Germans aren't sitting on the sideslines: they're going to actively shaft [British Airways owner IAG] and easyJet. This is an historic opportunity for them.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

We'd be very willing to buy Alitalia. But I suspect... given we're the number one airline in Italy we'd be blocked under EU competition rules.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

We would be willing to take on both the short-haul and the long-haul [fleet]. One of the aspects of Alitalia that is really attractive is the long-haul fleet, which has the capacity to grow very strongly.feedback

Kenny Jacobs

This regulation is enforced on our behalf by security contractors at Manchester airport and those who are attempting to conceal alcohol may be denied travel and we have asked them to ensure our policies are enforced correctly.feedback

John-Lee Saez

Our advice is to do your research up front. Some airlines charge as little as nothing whilst others can cost as much as £70 extra for priority seating. Sometimes the comfort is worth the cash, but don't get caught up with unnecessary charges if you're happy to sit next to whoever on the flight.feedback

John-Lee Saez

The research shows that some airlines are considerably tougher on the wallet if you wish to reserve a seat. If you have to check in at the desk, you will often find that being polite and just asking can get you the seat you want – whether that is next to someone else you want to sit with, or a seat with extra legroom. But in many cases, if you are checking in automatically, or with an airline where the format is 'first come, first served' when you get on board, the only way to guarantee is to pay.feedback

Kenny Jacobs

It's completely unfair that airports can profit from the unlimited sale of alcohol to passengers and leave the airlines to deal with the safety consequences. This is a particular problem during flight delays when airports apply no limit to the sale of alcohol in airside bars and restaurants. Given that all our flights are short-haul, very little alcohol is actually sold on board so it's incumbent on the airports to introduce these preventative measures to curb excessive drinking and the problems it creates, rather than allowing passengers to drink to excess before their flights.feedback

Fergal McGivney

The trend now is for younger consumers in particular to try and fit in as many holidays as possible, so they have their main holiday in the summer which they supplement with multiple trips throughout the year. Ryanair played a big part in this, with their basic model - so instead of offering a BA-type service, they operated a high-volume, no-frills model. What they also did was expand the route network to places like Krakow in Poland, so short trips became more affordable.feedback

Clarke Cowell - Holiday Extras

During peak times people are keen to get to their destination as quickly and smoothly as possible, so frustrations caused by latecomers are understandable.feedback

Richard Moriarty - Civil Aviation Authority

This is the first time that the CAA has used its investigatory powers under the Transport Act 2000 and highlights the potential seriousness of the complaint raised. In this instance, our investigation has found no compliance breach, however improvements to operational resilience are key to ensuring service delivery levels are maintained in our increasingly busy airspace.feedback

Neil Sorahan

If someone comes to us with the right price, we'll clearly look at it but at the moment it's not high on the list.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

We have told them to go back and if they can come up with a price on the Max 10 that meaningfully reduces our unit cost, we would be very happy to place an order. We are very interested in the aircraft - but we are only interested in this aircraft or any aircraft if it lowers our unit costs. We do believe that a 230 seat aircraft can deliver a meaningful reduction in unit costs.feedback

Neil Sorahan

There are a few guys out there who look like they are starting to find life difficult.feedback

Pascal Soriot - AstraZeneca

Together, we are poised to achieve something remarkable and that few thought possible… Nothing can break the momentum you have established, and certainly not rumours.feedback

Annie Bennett

West of Catalonia, you enter the vast region of Aragón. The town of Teruel, with its astonishing Mudéjar architecture, the pretty villages of Albarracín and Alqúezar, and the Ordesa National Park, are just a few of the things to see in this undervisited part of the country. And you can fly direct to the capital, Zaragoza, with Ryanair.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

Ownership post Brexit is a real issue. It might help me to accelerate the share buyback if UK shareholders are forced to sell. There is not a legal mechanism on which airlines can operate in a 'hard Brexit, no deal' outcome. There will simply be no flights.feedback

William Shaw - VivaColombia

There are people out there right now researching whether you can fly standing up – we're very interested in anything that makes travel less expensive. Who cares if you don't have an inflight entertainment system for a one-hour flight? Who cares that there aren't marble floors… or that you don't get free peanuts?feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

If there ever was a crash on an aircraft, God forbid, a seatbelt won't save you. You don't need a seatbelt on the London Underground. You don't need a seatbelt on trains which are travelling at 120mph and if they crash you're all dead….feedback

Bjorn Kjos

We are speaking to both... We are fairly sure we will be able to set up a system with one of them this year.feedback

Nadejda Popova

It is unfortunate that an established airline such as British Airways has proven to be so vulnerable. It's shown that they have poor risk management – this was an illustration of what not to do.feedback

Kathleen Brooks - GAIN Capital

Although cost cutting has been good for the share price in the last year, it will come back to bite IAG if it stops them from doing what they are supposed to do: Fly passengers to their destinations.feedback

Loizos Heracleous

The ability to set up an airline from scratch by-passes a lot of the legacy issues, because you can go for state-of-the-art systems. Newer airlines can also invest in IT systems that are more easily upgradeable and scaleable. An airline such as Ryanair, that is also financially successful, has more leeway to divert needed resources towards upgrading its IT systems.feedback

Kenny Jacobs

If there isn't a new bilateral in place, you may have very restrictive or no flying between Europe and the UK for a period. And I think It's clear we're heading to what looks to be a very ugly divorce at the moment. Our call on the government here is to please give us and other airlines clarity. Every airline is saying the same. We want to continue doing what we do. Three-quarters of British citizens go to Europe on their holidays, 80 per cent of British business travel is to the continent of Europe, so we need clarity.feedback

Alex Cruz - Heathrow

We will make sure that nothing like this ever happens in British Airways again. I can confirm that all the parties involved around this particular event have not been involved in any type of outsourcing in any foreign country. They have all been local issues around a local data centre, which have been managed and fixed by local resources.feedback

Kenny Jacobs

For the industry in general I think uncertainty over Brexit, that is the single biggest issue. Other than that there is over-capacity in Europe as charters are moving out of Turkey, north Africa, into mainland Europe. They will continue to be the two biggest challenges in the coming year.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

The gap is widening between Ryanair and our competitors. Investors should be wary of the risk of negative Brexit developments, or any repeat of last year's security events at European cities, which could damage consumer confidence.feedback

Kenny Jacobs

It was a disaster for them at the weekend and we had a but of fun on social media. We don't take social media seriously but we do take IT very seriously and that is why we've never had an outage. The footprint that we have is easier to control as a result.feedback

Neil Sorahan

We need to get some kind of clarity on whether the U.K. is going to stay in the open skies (agreement). It looks like they're not and if they don't then we need to see some movements made in relation to negotiating bilateral agreements. If these bilateral agreements are not negotiated by October 2018 then the chances of being rectified by March 2019 are very slim, which means there's a distinct possibility that there could be no flights in and out the U.K. for a period of time … days, weeks, months, we don't know.feedback

Neil Sorahan

Our biggest concern is that we have no certainty as we roll into this time next year and we are in a position where we're in 12 months we have to start loading our summer schedule for 2019. What happened to them appears to have been a hardware which was impacted by a power surge. We have our critical data over a number of data centers, so if one goes down, it would fall over to the other centers.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

I take comfort from the fact that we can increase profit in a year where fares fall by 13 percent. We have seen profitability double ... over a three year period and frankly I see no reason why that trend won't continue.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

I see a lot of airlines talking up the first half of the year and talking up (revenue per passenger) yield performance. I think that is a little overdone.feedback

Neil Sorahan

We are maybe a little less optimistic than some of the other airlines out there on pricing but we are all singing the same tune.feedback

Mark Simpson - Goodbody

This is a slightly disappointing statement, with everything a little more muted than we had forecast.feedback

David O'Brien - Ryanair

Given the terrorist attacks and a big shift in capacity from North Africa Egypt and Turkey into Spain creating overcapacity, it was a good year.feedback

Kenny Jacobs

We have three IT locations across Europe and these are owned and managed by Ryanair. One of them is used at any one time. If we did have an issue which caused an outage in one, automatically one of the other two would kick in and in our 31 year history, thankfully, have never had an issue.feedback

Kenny Jacobs

We take IT very seriously - the important thing here is making sure that we don't have an outage like BA had that caused such disruption to their customers.feedback

Tom Callway

Apologizes all well and good but not enough. BA has lost another loyal customer #disgraceful.feedback

Mike Irvine-Fortescue - Panmure Gordon & Co.

Ryanair's fare weakness has been exaggerated by sterling headwinds and trading-off higher load factors, which we expect to fade in Summer 2018, supporting an improved yield outlook.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

We've written to the Italian government and we've said 'look, if something untoward happens, don't worry, we will step into the breach.feedback

Wu Guanghui - Commercial Aircraft Corporation of China

Comac will choose international suppliers through bidding, but priority will go to foreign suppliers that design and manufacture products with domestic companies.feedback

Douglas Quinby - PhoCusWright

I always admired Ryanair and Spirit – cheap tickets and crappy service, But they were honest about it, and never tried to dress it up in corporate marketing speak.feedback

Kevin Clarke

We have always considered this to be a straightforward argument and we welcome this judgment from the court. The history of this regulation has been legal challenge after legal challenge from the airline industry and we are pleased the court has provided another pro-passenger decision.feedback

Kenny Jacobs

We're Aldi in the air. We don't like Ryanair to be like any other airline.feedback

Kenny Jacobs

I want you to be able to come onto the Ryanair website and browse a flight from Madrid to Cancun. To be able to browse any type of flight from anyone who wants to list their fares.feedback

Neil Sorahan

There's a big need for the UK to agree bilateral agreements with the EU bloc. [Should this not happen] there's a distinct possibility that there could be a period of time - days, weeks, months - where flights can not get in or out of Europe.feedback

Kenny Jacobs

This is a big new aspect for low-cost airlines working with legacy carriers.feedback

Neil Sorahan

Ryanair is pivoting its growth away from the UK. We may see that growth slow down as we get closer to the divorce negotiations coming to an end, unless we get greater certainty as to what we actually can or cannot do within Europe. The only positive, I suppose, for our customers, is that this will lead to lower fares, as we have to stimulate the market.feedback

Kenny Jacobs

There is the distinct possibility that if a deal isn't found in March 2019, when Britain leaves Europe, that there won't be flying for a certain period of time. If it (a deal) happens in 2019, that's too late. We're calling for a solution in 2017 so that we continue to fly as we do. This is a divorce and it's shaping up to be an ugly and messy divorce. On the one side the British are saying we want to talk about access to the market, (on the other) the Europeans are saying we want to talk about the settlement.feedback

Kenny Jacobs

We're saying can you both please just think about the consumers who are involved in the middle.feedback

Kenny Jacobs

It's become worrying that the UK government seems to have no plan B to maintain Britain's liberalised air links with Europe in the absence of remaining in the 'Open Skies' regime. The best we can hope for is a new bilateral agreement between the UK and EU, however, we worry that Britain may not be able to negotiate such a bilateral in time for the release by airlines of summer 2019 schedules in mid-2018. The UK Government must respond to the airlines and our customers, and put aviation at the top of its agenda when it negotiates its Brexit deal with Brussels.feedback

Kenny Jacobs

Some nine months on from the Brexit referendum, we are no closer to knowing what effect it will have on aviation. With Britain planning to leave the EU and its Open Skies agreement there is a distinct possibility that there may be no flights between the UK and Europe for a period of time after March 2019. We worry that Britain may not be able to negotiate such a bilateral deal in time for the release by airlines of summer 2019 schedules in mid-2018.feedback

Nick Trend

This strikes me as a significant mistake by BA. If it has one invaluable asset as an airline, it is that many customers still believe they will get a better experience flying with BA than with cheaper alternatives such as Ryanair. That's a hard reputation to win; and an easy one to lose.feedback

Hannah Maundrell

BA are playing a dangerous game if they're trying to battle the budget airlines head on. They should look to what's happened in the supermarket sector before they make any further cuts. Trying to compete with budget brands purely on price didn't work there and I'm doubtful whether it will here either. Great customer service is what coaxes consumers into spending more and this is one area where BA simply can't afford to compromise.feedback

Kenny Jacobs

We call on the French Government and European Commission to take immediate action to prevent thousands of European consumers from having their travel plans disrupted by a tiny group of ATC unions going on strike. They cannot stand idly by and allow another summer of disruption and travel misery for European consumers to take place. We urge all customers to sign the A4E online petition, Keep Europe's Skies Open, to help protect Europe from repeated disruption by ATC unions.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

We would be very happy to buy and fly Airbus. They're equally good aircraft. The main reason for our purchase decisions is which can we get cheaper.feedback

Neil Sorahan

European consumers have had great value in the last quarter where they have seen [average] fares of 33 euro. We are talking about a 15 percent reduction potentially into the next quarter. There will be a good choice and a lot of capacity in the market this summer which will probably have a downward impact on pricing. That said, fuel is starting to rise so the weaker carriers who don't have hedges will likely see their costs increase.feedback

Neil Wilson - ETX Capital

Ryanair's trouble is that it has huge exposure to the UK market and sterling, but earnings are booked in euros. The company's response to the drop in the pound – to aggressively lower fares to grab market share while expanding routes – doesn't help profits in the near term. But going forward the growth in traffic will help put it on a surer footing, particularly as it's also reducing costs.feedback

Gerald Khoo - Liberum Capital

The Q3 results came in marginally light of our forecasts and consensus… However, we expect Ryanair's peers to face greater pressure given their narrower margins.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

Europe's airlines have either been taking on too much new capacity or have not been retiring loss-making capacity over the past two years because oil prices were falling. That should reverse itself this year. We hope it will be less than [5 percent] but frankly, the way we are expanding capacity, the way others are expanding capacity, it may be worse.feedback

Karl Ulrich Garnadt

The market reaction in Munich gives us confidence to look at doing similar in Frankfurt. Eurowings is the platform of choice for that and we are working on a solution for summer 2018.feedback

József Váradi - Wizz Air

We are taking advantage of the low-fare environment, and we are growing more aggressively than planned before. I think our competitors are affected in a much bigger way, and I think this is why this is right for us to take advantage.feedback

Andreas Mundt

Lufthansa has the chance to expand with these planes but that growth is not enough to block the deal.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

We can help them by offering them cheap feed, low-cost feed into their hubs ... but that means taking out aircraft, people, and that's very difficult politically in Italy. We are still talking to them. It is nothing other than a takeover. They have been very receptive. The outcome for fares depends on what happens on Brexit and economic confidence in UK and Europe, what happens to oil, and unforeseen security events.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

As long as profitability continues to rise from 1.25 billion (euros) last year, in line with traffic, ... I see no reason why share buy backs shouldn't continue, absent unforeseen shocks.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

We have a plan, we think, for every eventuality. But the reality is no one bloody knows. If we had 12 months' notice, we could re-house 100 aircraft into continental Europe – I mean we have 84 bases. But it would mean significant over-capacity (on intra-EU routes) …and there would be downward pressure on pricing and on profits for a year or two. There are 500 different scenarios, some of them involve us closing them [the UK routes] down, most of them don't.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

We worry that the price of remaining in Open Skies will be the UK accepting freedom of movement of people ... I think that may be unlikely, in which case we may be heading for a very hard Brexit. I don't think it is possible to get interim arrangements through 27 European parliaments in a two-year period, so the British will fall off a cliff in two years' time. There will be slower UK growth but also slower European growth.feedback

Michael Gierse

They want to reach the level of easyJet, but it's a tricky path. There's airports in Europe, such as Brussels, where Ryanair has even ousted easyJet.feedback

Kenny Jacobs

It is going to be an interesting space. Everyone is going for the same ball in the middle and everyone wants to own more of the trip.feedback

Kenny Jacobs

We are already bringing you to the destination ... if we can offer you top class hotel inventory and we forgo our part of the commission to drive bookings, we're confident we'll have the best offer.feedback

Peter Bellew

They say they don't need low- cost carriers. They are looking for full-service carriers, with alliances.feedback

Carolyn McCall - EasyJet

Over the years we have had numerous discussions with them, but it's not a priority for us, and we have no plans to base planes there at the moment.feedback

Peter Bellew

March 2019. Notwithstanding shocks, that's our Olympic Games, that's what we're focused on at the moment.feedback

Peter Bellew

There are going to be some big losers. There is going to be blood on the floor.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

We have EU incumbents retrenching, restructuring... creating more and more opportunities for Ryanair, particularly in primary airports.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

Given the (election) results are out in two days time, I don't think it will make that much difference, unless of course Trump upsets the polls, in which case chaos will ensue. But it might be entertaining for a number of months.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

Leary told CNBC that there's been too much talk on the U.S. election and that, just like Brexit negotiations, it's time to get it done. We have much bigger issues here, certainly, in Europe to worry about rather than who's in the White House.feedback

Willie Walsh - International Airlines Group

We continue to have dialogue with Ryanair at Dublin. Personally, I see no reason why we can't reach a sensible commercial agreement with Ryanair.feedback

Kenny Jacobs

This is not to do with Brexit. But we're now planning for a period of uncertainty.feedback

Kenny Jacobs

We think and we hope it will happen for some airline in 2017.feedback

David O'Brien - Ryanair

We are open indeed to any airline tapping into our network, even Lufthansa.feedback

John Strickland

But Ryanair is likely to succeed soon, though at this time Lufthansa would be a less likely candidate.feedback

Carsten Spohr - Deutsche Lufthansa

My preference is to feed our long haul with Lufthansa. My second preference is (Lufthansa's budget carrier) Eurowings. My third preference is to use other partners.feedback

David O'Brien - Ryanair

Anyone can produce a low fare, producing a low fare with a margin is the trick.feedback

Bjoern Kjos

The overall development is good in all markets, and the biggest growth is in Spain, particularly on domestic routes. The routes between London and Paris and the U.S. are in high demand.feedback

Chris Beauchamp

EasyJet is the outperformer today, having underperformed all year compared to Ryanair. But there might now be an improvement in earnings relative to Ryanair, so that could start to reverse that trend.feedback

Gerald Khoo - Liberum Capital

Ryanair is the winner of the European airline industry. Tough trading conditions are an opportunity to make strategic progress at the expense of weaker competitors.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

We would caution that this revised guidance remains heavily dependent upon no further weakness in H2 fares (-13 percent to -15 percent) or sterling from its current levels.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

We are in a low-fare environment, but we like low-fare environments because we are the lowest-cost producer. We are taking very significant traffic away from incumbents … and we see that continuing.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

In every market we are competing with other incumbents, whether they be allegedly low cost carriers or legacy carriers. We are taking very significant traffic away ... and we see that continuing.feedback

Oliver Sleath - Barclays

The problem is that at the moment the incumbents are in absolutely no mind to shrink. I think that investors need to be braced for a tough year or two.feedback

Carolyn McCall - EasyJet

History shows that at times like this the strongest airlines become stronger.feedback

Jonathan Wober

It's just about getting the balance right and that really does depend on how long the over-capacity remains.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

The German airports will then be trying to encourage Ryanair to open more routes. So I think it's likely to speed up our growth in Germany.feedback

Michael Gierse

But it will only delay them and not prevent them completely.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

We are talking about new investments in Italy that we are making by revisiting our programmes in Greece, Poland and Spain.feedback

Jarrod Castle - UBS

We have seen a number of the largest European airlines profit warn over the last month.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

This modest 4 percent increase in (first quarter) profit to 256 million euro ($281 million) is in line with previous guidance.feedback

Jarrod Castle - UBS

The trading environment has taken a turn for the worse due to geopolitics and recent events which means it is likely that only a marginal amount of the net benefit will be retained. While Lufthansa will generate nearly 1 billion euros of fuel tailwind, we think based on current guidance the majority of the tailwind will be passed on to consumers.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

Always in a downturn we would expect to see lower pricing, but we maintain demand.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

I don't think any other airline in Europe will be delivering or forecasting that kind of profit growth. But all of the clouds on the horizon suggest there are significant risks to the downside in the second half of the year.feedback

Carolyn McCall - EasyJet

EasyJet continues to attract record numbers of passengers due to its wide range of destinations, convenient flight times and value for money fares. We have been disproportionately affected by extraordinary events this year, but our excellent network, cost control and revenue initiatives, and our strong balance sheet underpin our confidence in the business.feedback

Neil Sorahan

Ryanair, as you're aware, is actively campaigning for the remain vote. We think Europe and the UK have benefitted from a lot of different things over the years in Europe. In particular low fares like ourselves. If there was to be a leave vote then clearly there would be an awful lot of things that would have to be negotiated over the coming months and years and we would certainly have to cross those bridges if and when we come to them.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

It goes to show just how bizarrely incompetent the 'leave' campaign are. We launched a huge seat sale for British citizens to come back to the U.K. ... Come home and vote Remain,' of course, there's nothing stopping the people who want to vote leave coming home either.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

Let me put it simply, if Britain isn't a member of the EU these investments, these jobs will be going to other countries. That's why Ryanair is campaigning so strongly for Britain to remain in the EU. If Britain leaves the single market Britain may be forced out of the Open Skies regime and airfares and the cost of holidays will rise. That's not speculation, that's a certainty.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

The longer-term effect though is we will invest less in the UK, we will certainly switch some of our existing UK investment into other European counties because we want to continue to invest in the European Union and it will be bad for air travel and British tourism.feedback

James Stamp - KPMG

However, change brings opportunity and low cost airlines have always been able to capitalise on that.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

Most of the contribution being made by Ryanair is through our email, our customer base, advocating a remain vote because we fundamentally believe it's in the UK's best interests to remain in Europe. Will Ryanair have any effect? I think not really. Around the margins, we may.feedback

Carolyn McCall - EasyJet

Consumers have benefited greatly from deregulation and from lower prices and from a massive expansion of routes.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

After every crisis including 9/11, Ryanair has sold cheaper fares to keep people flying. It [a vote for a Brexit] would have a downward effect on our pricing for six to 12 months, but we will keep people flying.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

Ryanair has invested in Athens and also in many of the Greek islands, and we are growing strongly here in the market because there is significant demand from all over Europe, from people who want to visit Athens and visit Greece.feedback

Carolyn McCall - EasyJet

I don't think they are more of a competitor, I think our competition remains the legacy carriers. There's a lot for both of us to go for.feedback

Carolyn McCall - EasyJet

I'm staying at easyJet. I love easyJet. I really like what I am doing and I am here to stay. No intention to leave.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

In light of our rising profitability and improving cashflow, the board has approved an 800 million euro share buy-back to commence on Feb 5 next.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

In January-March we'll see a 10-20 million euro hit. That's due to the ATC (air traffic control) strikes and the Brussels attacks. What is harder to gauge is what will be the impact on travel confidence after Easter, in the April-May period. It's too early to say if there will be a material impact. In general, the airlines will have to lower air fares after Easter because there will still be a rump of nervousness.feedback

John Strickland

Many airlines will increasingly get benefits of low fuel as hedges unwind. This will certainly bring into sharp focus areas of high cost in the legacy airlines such as labour and it comes at a time when Ryanair is piling on the competitive pressure in Germany with massively expanded capacity.feedback

Willie Walsh - International Airlines Group

Acquiring Aer Lingus would add a fourth competitive, cost-effective airline to IAG, enabling us to develop our network using Dublin.feedback

Paschal Donohoe

There's a number of extremely important changes that have led to this decision by government.feedback

Willie Walsh - International Airlines Group

We're hopeful that Ryanair will see this as an attractive offer for their stake in Aer Lingus and we will wait to see what Ryanair and the Ryanair board says in response to this.feedback

Willie Walsh - International Airlines Group

They've (Ryanair) been absolutely consistent throughout in stating that the board of Ryanair would consider any offer if and when the offer was made. I'm sure they will wait to see the formal offer documentation and give that documentation very careful consideration.feedback

Willie Walsh - International Airlines Group

There's no way, absolutely no way, this business will exist in two years' time if people look at it as a temporary downturn. This business will not survive.feedback

Simon Calder

I reckon they're thinking – what can we do to persuade our staff, not just to work the odd week for nothing but to take pay cuts, to renegotiate all the terms and conditions, which are some of the most favourable in the aviation industry, so that we can properly compete with the likes of Easyjet and Ryanair.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

The market is soft. Passengers are facing significantly higher taxes and charges and I think that's having a dampening effect on growth.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

I see a lot of upside in us not growing for the next year or two, at least not growing in the top line.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

I think the regulators are a bit more sensible than they were last year. I hope there will be no airspace closures – there shouldn't be, certainly not over any countries where we are flying.feedback

Robin Kiely - Ryanair

It appears clear from this morning's meeting that no matter what remedies Ryanair offered we were not going to get a fair hearing and were going to be prohibited regardless of competition rules.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

There is a weaker pricing environment out there. Get over it. Wherever that pricing falls, it will be significantly below what our competitors can withstand.feedback

Michael Cawley - Ryanair

We still have only ten percent of the total market in Europe so there's plenty of scope for us to reduce fares to stimulate that growth.feedback

Gabor G Varga

The biggest question is who will travel with this airline, and not specifically with Solyom but who will travel with any Hungarian airline? After the bankruptcy of Malev in February 2012, the cheap airlines and the big international companies have allegedly filled up the market. Whether this is really so will become clear now. At the same time, it's a big question whether the Hungarian market can be a basis for a successful premium airline from Budapest.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

While disappointing that profits fell 8 percent… we reacted quickly to this weaker environment last September by lowering fares and improving our customer experience.feedback

Stephen Furlong - The Davy Group

Ryanair's rivals certainly haven't indicated they have seen this kind of weakness, though Ryanair has a history of calling things early.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

I have no doubt that the market will be weaker than the industry is expecting over the next couple of months and we are going to respond to that by being out there first and being aggressive with pricing.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

We've never refused to pay, we just said yesterday we would propose to limit the payments to the ticket price paid. We will reimburse reasonable receipted expenses from disrupted passengers if they send them to us, but we will not be paying compensation because the EU261 says no compensation arises if the cancellations are not the fault of the airlines.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

I think largely speaking they (Ryanair's good results) are the causes of much of BA's losses. I mean, passengers are increasingly switching to flying with Ryanair, because they get the lowest fares, the most on-time flights, and we don't lose their bags either.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

They just invented these false claims some six months after they were dismissed: one for breach of safety regulations, and two was dismissed because she wouldn't turn up for work during her 12-month probation.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

Can we have some common sense response to this, to maybe cargo aircraft or to cargo packages, but we really don't need any more complicated and completely ineffectual security measures for passengers at airports, given that most of the existing ones have no bearing on security whatsoever.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

This small Q3 loss is disappointing, as we were on track to break even, but earnings were hit by a series of air traffic controllers strikes compounded by a spate of bad weather airport closures in December.feedback

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